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-   -   Glider rating to LSA rating (http://www.aviationbanter.com/showthread.php?t=222607)

POPS May 21st 16 07:01 PM

Glider rating to LSA rating
 
What does one need to do if going from a glider rating with no self-launch endorsement, into the LSA rating, and not get trapped at 10,000MSL. I could easily get the self-launch endorsement if necessary.

I'm a bit confused and would love it if someone can map out a strategy to end up with the biggest bang for the buck..

Thank you in advance....

[email protected] May 21st 16 11:19 PM

Glider rating to LSA rating
 
Get the self launch endorsement. As a sport pilot, and I assume you are talking about in a LSA SEL, you re limited to 10000 MLS or 2500 AGL, whichever is higher, period.

son_of_flubber May 22nd 16 12:45 AM

Glider rating to LSA rating
 
This link http://www.phoenixairusa.com/LSA_Glider.html does not answer your question as posed, but it illustrates by example that pilot ratings interact with the airworthiness certificate of the aircraft.





Bill T May 22nd 16 04:11 AM

Glider rating to LSA rating
 
There seems to be something wrong in that Phoenix link.
He states it is a LSA Glider, and states an airplane rated pilot can fly it?
I don't think so. If the aircraft certificate says glider, then a glider rating is required.
I will agree that as light sport, only two CFIG can provide a glider rating at Light Sport level after appropriate training.
An airplane pilot to light sport glider can fly above 10,000MSL.
A pure Light Sport rated pilot with no higher rating in another aircraft is limited to 10,000MSL

Does that, make sense, probably not.

BillT

Bill T May 22nd 16 04:18 AM

Glider rating to LSA rating
 
If you have a Private Glider or Commercial Glider rating and want to fly light sport glider, I don't see the problem. You are already qualified to fly a glider above 10,000 MSL.

If you want to fly a self launch or "motor glider", it's a glider, that may qualify for "Light Sport" because it is speed limited. Get the self launch endorsement and go fly.
You do not need a "light sport" rating.

If it's certified as an "light sport airplane", then you need a light sport airplane rating, 8710-11 completed with two qualified instructors after training.

Is the mud getting thinner now?

BillT

POPS May 23rd 16 06:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by (Post 925307)
Get the self launch endorsement. As a sport pilot, and I assume you are talking about in a LSA SEL, you re limited to 10000 MLS or 2500 AGL, whichever is higher, period.

Ok so,
1. With a self-launch endorsement and all my glider flight time CAN I legally fly LSA aircraft without getting the LSA licence. What about Canada. I need to get through Canada to get to Alaska...

2. If #1 is true, then can I fly any LSA aircraft above 10,000 with a SL glider rating only.

3. If I wish to get a LSA licence - for Canadian purposes say - and I use my SL glider rating, is it just a form to fill out to get that LSA licence, or do I need to do flight training with LSA instructors etc.

4. If #3 requires LSA flight training, is any SL glider/glider flight time worth anything.

When I ask these questions to some LSA flight schools I get conflicting and directly opposite responses all the way to : "gee I have no idea? "

Anyone out there that has actually gone from SL glider to flying LSA aircraft?

Thanks for your post.

Terry Pitts May 23rd 16 09:39 AM

Glider rating to LSA rating
 

Ok so,
1. With a self-launch endorsement and all my glider flight time CAN I
legally fly LSA aircraft without getting the LSA licence. What about
Canada. I need to get through Canada to get to Alaska...

2. If #1 is true, then can I fly any LSA aircraft above 10,000 with a
SL glider rating only.

3. If I wish to get a LSA licence - for Canadian purposes say - and I
use my SL glider rating, is it just a form to fill out to get that LSA
licence, or do I need to do flight training with LSA instructors etc.

4. If #3 requires LSA flight training, is any SL glider/glider flight
time worth anything.


Pops et al,

Your private pilot glider certificate includes the privileges of sport pilot. Your logbook includes the self launching endorsement (I presume).

Because you have the privileges of light sport, you can add on "ratings" for a large variety of other light sport categories (power, gyro, floats, etc..) by 1) "training to proficiency" with one CFI and being 2) "checked for proficiency" by another properly rated CFI. Send an 8710-11 to your friends at the FAA, and you are done. (Off topic, but good info - this alone does not constitute a flight review.)

If you do the above in a Light Sport Airplane, you can then fly that light sport airplane within all the limits 10,000/2,500', max airspeed, and so on..

All of your existing glider time "counts" although that's pretty meaningless in the sport add-on arena.

It's not hard to do, you just have to find a suitable LSA to fly.

Terry

Dan Daly[_2_] May 23rd 16 12:35 PM

Glider rating to LSA rating
 
On Monday, May 23, 2016 at 2:43:04 AM UTC-4, POPS wrote:
@gmail.com;925307 Wrote:
Get the self launch endorsement. As a sport pilot, and I assume you are
talking about in a LSA SEL, you re limited to 10000 MLS or 2500 AGL,
whichever is higher, period.


Ok so,
1. With a self-launch endorsement and all my glider flight time CAN I
legally fly LSA aircraft without getting the LSA licence. What about
Canada. I need to get through Canada to get to Alaska...

2. If #1 is true, then can I fly any LSA aircraft above 10,000 with a
SL glider rating only.

3. If I wish to get a LSA licence - for Canadian purposes say - and I
use my SL glider rating, is it just a form to fill out to get that LSA
licence, or do I need to do flight training with LSA instructors etc.

4. If #3 requires LSA flight training, is any SL glider/glider flight
time worth anything.

When I ask these questions to some LSA flight schools I get conflicting
and directly opposite responses all the way to : "gee I have no idea? "

Anyone out there that has actually gone from SL glider to flying LSA
aircraft?

Thanks for your post.




--
POPS


There is no LSA category in Canada...

From COPA news release:
quote
U.S. registered Light Sport Aircraft permitted in Canada
By Patrick Gilligan

A recent exemption by Transport Canada (TC) makes it more affordable and less onerous for Light Sport Aircraft (LSA) from the United States to be flown into Canada.
TC’s new Standardized Validation form puts LSA on equal footing with U.S. amateur-built aircraft flying into Canada. U.S. LSA owners simply have to download the Standardized Validation form found at: http://www.tc.gc.ca/civilaviation/ma...validation.htm , and follow other entry requirements such as customs, and fly. The $100 fee has been eliminated.
TC still requires U.S. pilots flying LSA aircraft in Canadian airspace to hold at least a private pilot certificate and a current FAA medical certificate.
unquote

You can read the whole thing on the COPA website at https://www.copanational.org/CAWMay10-1En.cfm




son_of_flubber May 23rd 16 12:40 PM

Glider rating to LSA rating
 
On Monday, May 23, 2016 at 4:39:16 AM UTC-4, Terry Pitts wrote:

Your private pilot glider certificate includes the privileges of sport pilot. Your logbook includes the self launching endorsement (I presume).


That I already have sport pilot privileges because I hold USA PPL-Glider certificate comes as a surprise.

The Portland ME FSDO told me I needed to obtain a student pilot certificate to solo a powered LSA, take the PPL-SEL written test and practical test with a DPE to obtain a LSA category rating.

People on RAS told me that I could not obtain a student pilot certificate because I already hold a PPL-Glider certificate and the FAA will not issue two certificates to the same person.

My written inquiry to the certification branch of the FAA in OK for clarification has gone unanswered for over a month.

[email protected] May 23rd 16 02:02 PM

Glider rating to LSA rating
 
Asking for clarification is how we get the restrictive interpretations. Avoid doing so in the future if possible. All you need is a CFI and a SP legal airplane.


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