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Bailout and survival kit



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 4th 20, 02:09 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Default Bailout and survival kit

I attended Dave Nadler's presentation at the 2020 SSA Convention about his bailout in Utah and its aftermath https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v8I3A3dqsu0&t=3s

It got me thinking about my own preparedness, and I have to admit that I am not carrying enough on my person if I ever "have to go for help." (As our ex-Air Force airport manager describes a bailout.)

I've been thinking about fishing/photographers vests with a lot of pockets, but the parachute and seat belt harness straps interfere with comfort and safety. Small kits like the SMAK PAK are a good start, but I'd like to carry more stuff, like a hat, spare glasses, water etc. I am thinking of an Air Force type flight suit with leg pockets, at the risk of being called a fighter jock wannabe.

Possibly a thin pocketed backpack that could fit between the 'chute and your body, if it could be made comfortable and not interfere with the seating position in the glider would work. But what to put in it and how to you pack it to avoid lumps and stuff digging into your kidneys?

Any ideas or suggestions? What works for you?
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  #2  
Old May 4th 20, 02:45 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Default Bailout and survival kit


What works for you?


I hope to not know.

There is stuff in the glider, but finding it might be hard in a bailout.

Remember Dave lost his PLB. That's first on my list, followed by SMAK, pocket knife, cell phone, wallet. I could see two pints of water in pants legs or vest pockets. (Some folks fly with ice on their chest, so maybe that could be the water as well?)

Much more that on your person, and egress might be a problem?

I'm not sure where you could carry enough stuff to make much difference except between the sheepskin pad and chute housing. I have snaps there and maybe you could make a form fitting thing with snaps on both sides to fit in the middle. Would be hard to pack to be comfortable and not hurt the chute..

Maybe a seat pack under your butt if you are not too tall?

btw: a great subject for cabin fever.
  #3  
Old May 4th 20, 03:21 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Default Bailout and survival kit

I’d go with a vest, google USAF survival vest to see several good options. The pockets are below your parachute chest strap and quite comfortable as I remember.
Another way to go is get a BRS and keep your survival pack stowed away behind the seat. Wouldn’t it be real cool to make a May Day call after you get a good chute?
JJ
  #4  
Old May 4th 20, 03:36 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Default Bailout and survival kit

The BRS is not an option, as the system has to be engineered as part of the airframe. You just can't buy one and stick it in like a new flight computer. All BRS installations I know of in gliders are developed with the aircraft manufacturer for a particular application. And adding one to a Standard Certificated glider would be a huge exercise in frustration with FAA requirements and regulations.

I was a dealer for BRS in my hang gliding days (as well as Second Chantz) and those were incorporated into the pilot's harness and as such could be retrofitted.



  #5  
Old May 4th 20, 04:21 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Default Bailout and survival kit

On Monday, May 4, 2020 at 6:09:11 AM UTC-7, wrote:
I attended Dave Nadler's presentation at the 2020 SSA Convention about his bailout in Utah and its aftermath https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v8I3A3dqsu0&t=3s

It got me thinking about my own preparedness, and I have to admit that I am not carrying enough on my person if I ever "have to go for help." (As our ex-Air Force airport manager describes a bailout.)

I've been thinking about fishing/photographers vests with a lot of pockets, but the parachute and seat belt harness straps interfere with comfort and safety. Small kits like the SMAK PAK are a good start, but I'd like to carry more stuff, like a hat, spare glasses, water etc. I am thinking of an Air Force type flight suit with leg pockets, at the risk of being called a fighter jock wannabe.

Possibly a thin pocketed backpack that could fit between the 'chute and your body, if it could be made comfortable and not interfere with the seating position in the glider would work. But what to put in it and how to you pack it to avoid lumps and stuff digging into your kidneys?

Any ideas or suggestions? What works for you?


I've flown over lots of gnarly country over the years - both in South Africa and the USA. In many of these areas self-rescue by walking out is impossible and your only chance is to communicate with rescuers. That means having at least one and preferably two or three communications means secured to your person. For example, rescue beacon, cellphone and portable radio. An airband handheld enables communications with aircraft overhead and in many areas VHF amateur radio repeaters reach areas without cellphone coverage. Other than that, carry enough water to last you a day and a night.

Mike
  #6  
Old May 4th 20, 04:57 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Default Bailout and survival kit

A hand held airband is a good thing to have. Yaesu nakes a very small one little bigger than a pack of cigs. Thats what I carry also good for directing in your crew for a retreave when having to hike out to a road and away from your machine.
  #7  
Old May 4th 20, 08:49 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Default Bailout and survival kit


A hand held airband is a good thing to have.


I've thought about that. If you get separated from the glider, it also might help you find it if the glider has an old ELT.
  #8  
Old May 4th 20, 10:25 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Default Bailout and survival kit

I have a 'chute by Paraphernalia, in Arlington, WA. It has a small built in pouch at the base for survival equipment. Mine contains an aircraft radio with two sets of batteries, strobe with two sets of batteries, knife, compass, signal mirror, whistle, battery to recharge my cell phone, fire starter, stitching tool, paper, pen, and some cash.

I am considering replacing the radio with a Garmin InReach Mini.

My soaring clothes have zipped pockets. The cell phone goes in one, the wallet in another. Too much of a pain to take them in and out of the survival pouch.

The Spot is bolted in the nose of the glider forward of the rudder pedals.

P9
  #9  
Old May 5th 20, 12:05 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Default Bailout and survival kit

I've been looking online for survival/fishing/photographers vests and I have found some interesting choices. The Bushline Arapaho and Manitoulin vests look pretty good. It appears that the pockets are zippered and placed where interference with seat belts and parachute harness straps may not be as much of an issue as I thought. If shopping in public is ever permitted again, I might have to check out Cabela's and other sporting goods stores to see what's available. It would be nice to try one on and evaluate it.

  #10  
Old May 5th 20, 01:25 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Default Bailout and survival kit


The Spot is bolted in the nose of the glider forward of the rudder pedals..


So, with the Spot locator bolted in front of the rudder pedals, you don't have access to the SOS button. And if you have to "go for help," the SAR folks will start looking at your tracking information, which could be ~10 minutes old from the last updated position (unless the Spot survives the impact and continues to update). And then they will find the glider location. Hopefully, you will be close enough after bailout, chute deployment and descent to wave at them. But probably not. The Spot or InReach should be on YOU, not the aircraft.

Oh, BTW, carry the InReach instructions with you. Hate to make a safe landing (with or without glider) and not be able to remember how to send a text message.
 




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