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Bailout and survival kit



 
 
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  #21  
Old May 5th 20, 09:25 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Charlie M. (UH & 002 owner/pilot)
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Default Bailout and survival kit

Yep, caught that, got a chuckle as well....like "bucket of steam" or "left handed smoke shifter" back in Scouts....

No, I have minimum stuff when XC flying, then again, usually in cell range in the NE....
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  #22  
Old May 6th 20, 05:56 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
2G
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Default Bailout and survival kit

On Tuesday, May 5, 2020 at 1:25:30 PM UTC-7, Charlie M. (UH & 002 owner/pilot) wrote:
Yep, caught that, got a chuckle as well....like "bucket of steam" or "left handed smoke shifter" back in Scouts....

No, I have minimum stuff when XC flying, then again, usually in cell range in the NE....


A typical adult needs a gallon of water a day to stay hydrated. That is going to be pretty tough to hang from your parachute. Emergency water packets are much smaller than this. The only alternative is to find ground water or collect rainfall. Finding a water supply in the desert will be pretty tough. A space blanket would come in handy for the later. Thus it is vital that you communicate your location for rescue. A satellite messenger (Inreach, SPOT or a sat phone) is your best bet, but an aviation radio can put you in contact with airliners (not so many these days). Fly in clothes that you can spend the night outdoors in (a chute canopy will come in handy for warmth). You may need to hike out yourself. Put topo maps and a compass on your smart phone and practice using them. Carry an aux battery for the phone (some mountain climbers on Mt. Hood lost their last contact with rescuers when the only phone's battery died - they died too and were never found). Your hat will probably be lost while bailing out: carry a skull cap to protect your head from sun and cold. Having a fire starter is also a good idea, both for warmth and signalling. A signal mirror is essential in contacting rescuers. Of course a good whistle will help them find you when they are closer.. Remember, you may be injured and cannot move into a more visible location.. I also carry a handheld radio and a good knife. I have survived some pretty miserable nights on mountains - you have to be prepared to make it thru with whatever you have on hand at the time.

Tom
  #23  
Old May 7th 20, 02:41 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Default Bailout and survival kit

Don’t forget to save your yellow water to be used in an emergency after your dehydrated water runs out!
😛JJ
  #24  
Old May 7th 20, 04:04 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
2G
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Default Bailout and survival kit

On Wednesday, May 6, 2020 at 6:41:07 PM UTC-7, wrote:
Don’t forget to save your yellow water to be used in an emergency after your dehydrated water runs out!
😛JJ


It won't be the first time.
  #25  
Old May 9th 20, 06:12 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
David Shelton
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Default Bailout and survival kit

WATER: This is the number 1 thing that your body requires. I often carry a bit of water in a flexible Platypus container. They're suprisingly durable and more comfortable to keep in my pocket than a rigid container.

The reality is that you can't carry enough water to survive very long, so be sure that you can find and filter water. My Garmin InReach is useful for finding water (ponds, lakes, streams, etc.). If you can handle 2 ounces, then I highly recommend the Sawyer MINI water filter. I use it to refill my water bottles on ultralight backpacking and mountaineering trips. At the very least, toss several MSR Aquatabs into your first aid kit. Drop one in your water bottle, wait 30 minutes, and you'll have safe drinking water.

STAY WARM AND DRY: After dehydration, hypothermia is probably the next most likely way to die, especially if you can't keep dry. An emergency blanket is great. If you can spare 3.8 ounces, I like the S.O.L. emergency bivvy. It's more thermally efficient to sleep in a sealed tube. I've spent the night in one at 12,000ft in a snow cave. I had a little condensation inside because they don't breath, but I slept pretty well.

FI Waterproof matches, butane lighter, fancy flint device... take your pick. More importantly, know how to start a fire. Most people can't start a fire with a full book of matches.

FOOD: Two cliff bars.

FLASHLIGHT: Go with a small headlamp! I've had good luck with products from Princeton Tech, Black Diamond, and Petzl. A black Diamond Storm and spare batteries are part of my standard climbing kit. For emergency use, you could go with something lighter like a Petzl Bindi (200 lumens, 35 grams).

COMMUNICATION: Garmin Inreach and cell phone.

NAVIGATION: Don't bother hauling around a compass unless you actually know how to use it. Also, don't haul around a compass, even if you know how to use it. Compass navigation is a fun skill, but it's a waste of time if you have GPS and a cell phone.

I have a Garmin InReach and cell phone. Make sure that your cell phone is prepared to navigate offline. If you have Google maps, you can download maps to the phone. I also have the Gaia app on my phone. I use Gaia for ski mountaineering but it's also useful for finding your way through the back country.

KNIFE: I keep a 1oz Gerber STL in my first aid kit. I used to be more of a knife fan, but after spending an awful lot of time outdoors, I found that I very rarely need one.

First Aid Kit: My first aid kit is about the size of a wallet. A couple band aids, ibuprofin, tweezers, a piece of mole skin, safety pin, a foot of Duct tape, etc. The most likely items I'll use? Definitely the mole skin and ibuprofin! You don't need ace bandages, trauma sheers, or a pile of gauze. Unless you happen to be naked, you should have plenty of material to wrap up a wound. As with starting a fire, you really need to know what you're doing. There are plenty of books on wilderness first aid.

CLOTHING: Cotton kills! It provides little insulation value when wet. Wear synthetic clothing and hiking shoes. I normally wear gortex trail running shoes anyways, so my feet stay dry in snow or rain.

All of my survival gear fits in my pockets (zippered pockets so I can't lose it!). Ultralight gear has gotten so good that there's no longer a need for big vests and pouches. If you really insist on carrying a couple more pounds of stuff, then check out the 986 gram Dudek paraglider. All you need to do is launch off the nearest hill and then fly home
  #26  
Old May 9th 20, 01:01 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Default Bailout and survival kit

David- Excellent suggestions! However, you forgot to mention something important. How about toilet paper? Not absolutely necessary, but having some might make you feel like you are a little closer to civilization. And now that the "BIG RUSH" on supplies has calmed down, you might even be able to find some in the store.
  #27  
Old May 9th 20, 07:30 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Jonathan St. Cloud
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Default Bailout and survival kit

On Monday, May 4, 2020 at 6:09:11 AM UTC-7, wrote:
I attended Dave Nadler's presentation at the 2020 SSA Convention about his bailout in Utah and its aftermath https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v8I3A3dqsu0&t=3s

It got me thinking about my own preparedness, and I have to admit that I am not carrying enough on my person if I ever "have to go for help." (As our ex-Air Force airport manager describes a bailout.)

I've been thinking about fishing/photographers vests with a lot of pockets, but the parachute and seat belt harness straps interfere with comfort and safety. Small kits like the SMAK PAK are a good start, but I'd like to carry more stuff, like a hat, spare glasses, water etc. I am thinking of an Air Force type flight suit with leg pockets, at the risk of being called a fighter jock wannabe.

Possibly a thin pocketed backpack that could fit between the 'chute and your body, if it could be made comfortable and not interfere with the seating position in the glider would work. But what to put in it and how to you pack it to avoid lumps and stuff digging into your kidneys?

Any ideas or suggestions? What works for you?


At one point in time I was a paid mountain climbing guide, just by way of qualifications. The biggest mistake I see so many pilots making is not dress for egress. I was at a Nephi camp (lots of rough remote terrain), yet I saw many flying in cotton short-sleeve shirt and shorts! Sheesh, that is like telling Mother Nature "you are good, but I am better. Let me spot you half the points you need to wipe me off the planet." I wear Musto sailing pants (with very flat cargo pockets designed to be opened while sitting). I wear a long sleeve sun hoodie and I wear a paracord bracelet(multi-function with lots of goodies) on each wrist. If I am down without a glider and the wind rain starts I can at least use some handy paracord to tie shut my pants bottoms and shirt sleeve cuffs, fill both pants and shirt with leaves, sand, dirt rocks, for added insulation. I also carry on my body multiple forms of starting a fire from several lighters, and a combo flint stick multi-tool around my neck (inside shirt) with paracord https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...3PLXJ7DC&psc=1
I also have a smack pack with survival medical gear, qwick clot, water purification tabs, fire, tourniquet out of paracord with a sliding locker...et. I am not confident the smack pack would stay on while trashing about trying to over come g-forces, so I have a Mylar blanket in a pants cargo pocket with two small packs of water.
I have had an unplanned land out at dusk once, not in a glider but another type of aircraft. Had the evening to think about the errors of my survival kit. Staying warm and dryish, can be the difference between giving up or not. Stay safe boys and gals!
  #28  
Old May 9th 20, 08:06 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Jonathan St. Cloud
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Default Bailout and survival kit

On Saturday, May 9, 2020 at 11:30:07 AM UTC-7, Jonathan St. Cloud wrote:
On Monday, May 4, 2020 at 6:09:11 AM UTC-7, wrote:
I attended Dave Nadler's presentation at the 2020 SSA Convention about his bailout in Utah and its aftermath https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v8I3A3dqsu0&t=3s

It got me thinking about my own preparedness, and I have to admit that I am not carrying enough on my person if I ever "have to go for help." (As our ex-Air Force airport manager describes a bailout.)

I've been thinking about fishing/photographers vests with a lot of pockets, but the parachute and seat belt harness straps interfere with comfort and safety. Small kits like the SMAK PAK are a good start, but I'd like to carry more stuff, like a hat, spare glasses, water etc. I am thinking of an Air Force type flight suit with leg pockets, at the risk of being called a fighter jock wannabe.

Possibly a thin pocketed backpack that could fit between the 'chute and your body, if it could be made comfortable and not interfere with the seating position in the glider would work. But what to put in it and how to you pack it to avoid lumps and stuff digging into your kidneys?

Any ideas or suggestions? What works for you?


At one point in time I was a paid mountain climbing guide, just by way of qualifications. The biggest mistake I see so many pilots making is not dress for egress. I was at a Nephi camp (lots of rough remote terrain), yet I saw many flying in cotton short-sleeve shirt and shorts! Sheesh, that is like telling Mother Nature "you are good, but I am better. Let me spot you half the points you need to wipe me off the planet." I wear Musto sailing pants (with very flat cargo pockets designed to be opened while sitting). I wear a long sleeve sun hoodie and I wear a paracord bracelet(multi-function with lots of goodies) on each wrist. If I am down without a glider and the wind rain starts I can at least use some handy paracord to tie shut my pants bottoms and shirt sleeve cuffs, fill both pants and shirt with leaves, sand, dirt rocks, for added insulation. I also carry on my body multiple forms of starting a fire from several lighters, and a combo flint stick multi-tool around my neck (inside shirt) with paracord https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...3PLXJ7DC&psc=1
I also have a smack pack with survival medical gear, qwick clot, water purification tabs, fire, tourniquet out of paracord with a sliding locker...et. I am not confident the smack pack would stay on while trashing about trying to over come g-forces, so I have a Mylar blanket in a pants cargo pocket with two small packs of water.
I have had an unplanned land out at dusk once, not in a glider but another type of aircraft. Had the evening to think about the errors of my survival kit. Staying warm and dryish, can be the difference between giving up or not. Stay safe boys and gals!


The combo tool I wear around neck is considerably smaller than the one in the link above, but made by same company. The paracord bracelets I wear are by Wazoo (looks like they do not make anymore, but one of my bracelets has a wire saw woven into the paracord). I also carry several simple metal (very old style) lighters of kerosene fuel, wick and flint. This is a metal container that looks kind like a quail egg, it screws completely air tight. I check the kerosene level every year and test fire. I carry several of these on person and in smack pack. Wazoo does make a handy Firestarter business card that I carry in my flight wallet along with a credit card from one of my ex-wife's accounts. I know if I use that card she will come find me wherever I am.
  #29  
Old May 9th 20, 09:39 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
2G
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Default Bailout and survival kit

On Saturday, May 9, 2020 at 12:06:08 PM UTC-7, Jonathan St. Cloud wrote:
On Saturday, May 9, 2020 at 11:30:07 AM UTC-7, Jonathan St. Cloud wrote:
On Monday, May 4, 2020 at 6:09:11 AM UTC-7, wrote:
I attended Dave Nadler's presentation at the 2020 SSA Convention about his bailout in Utah and its aftermath https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v8I3A3dqsu0&t=3s

It got me thinking about my own preparedness, and I have to admit that I am not carrying enough on my person if I ever "have to go for help." (As our ex-Air Force airport manager describes a bailout.)

I've been thinking about fishing/photographers vests with a lot of pockets, but the parachute and seat belt harness straps interfere with comfort and safety. Small kits like the SMAK PAK are a good start, but I'd like to carry more stuff, like a hat, spare glasses, water etc. I am thinking of an Air Force type flight suit with leg pockets, at the risk of being called a fighter jock wannabe.

Possibly a thin pocketed backpack that could fit between the 'chute and your body, if it could be made comfortable and not interfere with the seating position in the glider would work. But what to put in it and how to you pack it to avoid lumps and stuff digging into your kidneys?

Any ideas or suggestions? What works for you?


At one point in time I was a paid mountain climbing guide, just by way of qualifications. The biggest mistake I see so many pilots making is not dress for egress. I was at a Nephi camp (lots of rough remote terrain), yet I saw many flying in cotton short-sleeve shirt and shorts! Sheesh, that is like telling Mother Nature "you are good, but I am better. Let me spot you half the points you need to wipe me off the planet." I wear Musto sailing pants (with very flat cargo pockets designed to be opened while sitting). I wear a long sleeve sun hoodie and I wear a paracord bracelet(multi-function with lots of goodies) on each wrist. If I am down without a glider and the wind rain starts I can at least use some handy paracord to tie shut my pants bottoms and shirt sleeve cuffs, fill both pants and shirt with leaves, sand, dirt rocks, for added insulation. I also carry on my body multiple forms of starting a fire from several lighters, and a combo flint stick multi-tool around my neck (inside shirt) with paracord https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...3PLXJ7DC&psc=1
I also have a smack pack with survival medical gear, qwick clot, water purification tabs, fire, tourniquet out of paracord with a sliding locker....et. I am not confident the smack pack would stay on while trashing about trying to over come g-forces, so I have a Mylar blanket in a pants cargo pocket with two small packs of water.
I have had an unplanned land out at dusk once, not in a glider but another type of aircraft. Had the evening to think about the errors of my survival kit. Staying warm and dryish, can be the difference between giving up or not. Stay safe boys and gals!


The combo tool I wear around neck is considerably smaller than the one in the link above, but made by same company. The paracord bracelets I wear are by Wazoo (looks like they do not make anymore, but one of my bracelets has a wire saw woven into the paracord). I also carry several simple metal (very old style) lighters of kerosene fuel, wick and flint. This is a metal container that looks kind like a quail egg, it screws completely air tight.. I check the kerosene level every year and test fire. I carry several of these on person and in smack pack. Wazoo does make a handy Firestarter business card that I carry in my flight wallet along with a credit card from one of my ex-wife's accounts. I know if I use that card she will come find me wherever I am.


Instead of a knife consider a Leatherman. It's several quality tools in one.. GPS is nice, but you don't always get reception; I have never seen Earth's magnetic field quit. If you don't know how to navigate by compass, how did you ever become a pilot? Oh, I forgot - the FAA doesn't require cross-country training for glider pilots. So, IF you are going to fly cross-country (why else would you need a survival kit?) learn how to navigate by ALL means at your disposal. Quick, what side of the tree does moss grow on?

Tom

  #30  
Old May 9th 20, 10:38 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Default Bailout and survival kit

You need warmth or shelter from the sun. You don't need water in some parts of the country and you can't bailout with enough in other parts of the country. I'm inclined to say the best thing is two inreaches. Or an inreach and a sat phone. Two is one, one is none. Gov't has all these fancy helicopters might as well get a ride.
 




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