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Flaps check - great lesson learned



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 4th 08, 09:18 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
steve[_1_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 23
Default Flaps check - great lesson learned

While recently getting checked out to fly a glass panel Cirrus, my
instructor, under the statement that the TAWS wasn't operating quite right,
reached down along the circuit panel while I was busy flying my last
instrument approach. As I entered the decent phase of a straight in landing,
I applied 50% flaps, then as I got near the runway, applied 100% flaps and
noticed that I was still coming in "different" than normal. I did a
beautiful landing and as we taxi'd off the runway, the instructor asked if I
noticed what was wrong. He had pulled the breaker on the electronic flaps so
I actually landed with no flaps extended. He stated that I ALWAYS need to do
visual verification that the flaps extended properly on both sides,
especially when they are electical.

It was a great lesson that I will never forget. I was also really pleased
with doing a good landing in an aircraft that wants to keep flying, even
with flaps extended.



--
Thanks,

Steve

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the Earth
with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there
you will always long to return"
- Leonardo Da Vinci


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  #2  
Old March 4th 08, 10:03 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
G Paleologopoulos
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 32
Default Flaps check - great lesson learned

"steve" wrote
...

While recently getting checked out to fly a glass panel Cirrus, my
instructor, under the statement that the TAWS wasn't operating quite
right, reached down along the circuit panel while I was busy flying my
last instrument approach. As I entered the decent phase of a straight in
landing, I applied 50% flaps, then as I got near the runway, applied 100%
flaps and noticed that I was still coming in "different" than normal. I
did a beautiful landing and as we taxi'd off the runway, the instructor
asked if I noticed what was wrong. He had pulled the breaker on the
electronic flaps so I actually landed with no flaps extended. He stated
that I ALWAYS need to do visual verification that the flaps extended
properly on both sides, especially when they are electical.

It was a great lesson that I will never forget. I was also really pleased
with doing a good landing in an aircraft that wants to keep flying, even
with flaps extended.




If you did a "beautiful landing" thinking you had full flaps, it means you
were coming in WAY too fast, had you the flaps.

  #3  
Old March 4th 08, 10:48 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
steve[_1_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 23
Default Flaps check - great lesson learned

You are correct, I was coming in at about 85 knots instead of the 75 at
touch down. too fast. It won't happen again.


"G Paleologopoulos" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
"steve" wrote
...

While recently getting checked out to fly a glass panel Cirrus, my
instructor, under the statement that the TAWS wasn't operating quite
right, reached down along the circuit panel while I was busy flying my
last instrument approach. As I entered the decent phase of a straight in
landing, I applied 50% flaps, then as I got near the runway, applied 100%
flaps and noticed that I was still coming in "different" than normal. I
did a beautiful landing and as we taxi'd off the runway, the instructor
asked if I noticed what was wrong. He had pulled the breaker on the
electronic flaps so I actually landed with no flaps extended. He stated
that I ALWAYS need to do visual verification that the flaps extended
properly on both sides, especially when they are electical.

It was a great lesson that I will never forget. I was also really pleased
with doing a good landing in an aircraft that wants to keep flying, even
with flaps extended.




If you did a "beautiful landing" thinking you had full flaps, it means you
were coming in WAY too fast, had you the flaps.



  #4  
Old March 5th 08, 03:30 AM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Kobra
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 119
Default Flaps check - great lesson learned


"steve" wrote in message
...
While recently getting checked out to fly a glass panel Cirrus, my
instructor, under the statement that the TAWS wasn't operating quite
right, reached down along the circuit panel while I was busy flying my
last instrument approach. As I entered the decent phase of a straight in
landing, I applied 50% flaps, then as I got near the runway, applied 100%
flaps and noticed that I was still coming in "different" than normal. I
did a beautiful landing and as we taxi'd off the runway, the instructor
asked if I noticed what was wrong. He had pulled the breaker on the
electronic flaps so I actually landed with no flaps extended. He stated
that I ALWAYS need to do visual verification that the flaps extended
properly on both sides, especially when they are electical.

It was a great lesson that I will never forget. I was also really pleased
with doing a good landing in an aircraft that wants to keep flying, even
with flaps extended.



--
Thanks,

Steve


Steve,

Google Kobra and No Flaps and you will see my post(s) to the rec.aviation
group. Take a look at all the Monday morning quarterbacks that ripped me a
new one for not noticing the flaps didn't deploy.

All the holier-than-thou pilots who think that they would NEVER not notice
the flaps not coming out. Oh, how I must be a second-rate pilot in
*desperate* need of additional training for being so un inattentive.

This happened twice. Once to me and once to my partner. Neither of us
noticed, we only new that we were too fast and corrected the extra speed
with power reductions and trim. Basicly, an unwitting no-flap landing.

Kobra


  #5  
Old March 5th 08, 05:30 AM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Ron
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 23
Default Flaps check - great lesson learned

On Tue, 4 Mar 2008 21:30:52 -0500, "Kobra" wrote:


"steve" wrote in message
...
While recently getting checked out to fly a glass panel Cirrus, my
instructor, under the statement that the TAWS wasn't operating quite
right, reached down along the circuit panel while I was busy flying my
last instrument approach. As I entered the decent phase of a straight in
landing, I applied 50% flaps, then as I got near the runway, applied 100%
flaps and noticed that I was still coming in "different" than normal. I
did a beautiful landing and as we taxi'd off the runway, the instructor
asked if I noticed what was wrong. He had pulled the breaker on the
electronic flaps so I actually landed with no flaps extended. He stated
that I ALWAYS need to do visual verification that the flaps extended
properly on both sides, especially when they are electical.

It was a great lesson that I will never forget. I was also really pleased
with doing a good landing in an aircraft that wants to keep flying, even
with flaps extended.



--
Thanks,

Steve


Steve,

Google Kobra and No Flaps and you will see my post(s) to the rec.aviation
group. Take a look at all the Monday morning quarterbacks that ripped me a
new one for not noticing the flaps didn't deploy.

All the holier-than-thou pilots who think that they would NEVER not notice
the flaps not coming out. Oh, how I must be a second-rate pilot in
*desperate* need of additional training for being so un inattentive.

This happened twice. Once to me and once to my partner. Neither of us
noticed, we only new that we were too fast and corrected the extra speed
with power reductions and trim. Basicly, an unwitting no-flap landing.

Kobra


Actually, there's no problem with no-flap landings in the typical spam
can or single engine glass jar. My instructor had me practice no flap
landings (172's) in case of electrical or mechanical failure. Also
taught me the use of slips in place of flaps to slow down and position
the aircraft for touchdown. Lots of fun.

Ron
  #6  
Old March 5th 08, 08:32 AM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
steve[_1_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 23
Default Flaps check - great lesson learned

Slips are great ways to reduce altitude or slow down. The problem with
Cirrus aircraft is that slips are not allowed in sr20s.

That said the Cirrus is by far the most fun aircraft I have flown, followed
by a piper arrow w/ retractable gear. We rent a Cirrus every August and fly
from Seattle to Bozeman, MT for a 4 day fishing trip. It is a spectacular
trip. Last year we were evacuated because of the fires and I had to fly IFR
all the way to Spokane because of the smoke creating 1.5 mile visibility
below 12,000 feet.

If you ever get a chance to fly one of these I would recommend going for it.
It isn't a complex aircraft, but it is a complicated one.


"Ron" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 4 Mar 2008 21:30:52 -0500, "Kobra" wrote:


"steve" wrote in message
...
While recently getting checked out to fly a glass panel Cirrus, my
instructor, under the statement that the TAWS wasn't operating quite
right, reached down along the circuit panel while I was busy flying my
last instrument approach. As I entered the decent phase of a straight in
landing, I applied 50% flaps, then as I got near the runway, applied
100%
flaps and noticed that I was still coming in "different" than normal. I
did a beautiful landing and as we taxi'd off the runway, the instructor
asked if I noticed what was wrong. He had pulled the breaker on the
electronic flaps so I actually landed with no flaps extended. He stated
that I ALWAYS need to do visual verification that the flaps extended
properly on both sides, especially when they are electical.

It was a great lesson that I will never forget. I was also really
pleased
with doing a good landing in an aircraft that wants to keep flying, even
with flaps extended.



--
Thanks,

Steve


Steve,

Google Kobra and No Flaps and you will see my post(s) to the rec.aviation
group. Take a look at all the Monday morning quarterbacks that ripped me
a
new one for not noticing the flaps didn't deploy.

All the holier-than-thou pilots who think that they would NEVER not notice
the flaps not coming out. Oh, how I must be a second-rate pilot in
*desperate* need of additional training for being so un inattentive.

This happened twice. Once to me and once to my partner. Neither of us
noticed, we only new that we were too fast and corrected the extra speed
with power reductions and trim. Basicly, an unwitting no-flap landing.

Kobra


Actually, there's no problem with no-flap landings in the typical spam
can or single engine glass jar. My instructor had me practice no flap
landings (172's) in case of electrical or mechanical failure. Also
taught me the use of slips in place of flaps to slow down and position
the aircraft for touchdown. Lots of fun.

Ron



 




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