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Basic question



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 13th 09, 03:07 PM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Basic question

As I have only ever flown Cessnas, I have a basic question. When
flying a stick plane like an RV-7. What hand do people fly with? On
a yoke I generally used 2 but if I had to use one to do something else
I would keep the left on the yoke. However, I don't know how
comfortable I would feel flying exclusively with the left hand on a
stick. I ask as I am playing on flight simulator and would prefer to
learn how it is actually done. If I have to learn to use the left
hand I will.

Thanks

Barry

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  #3  
Old February 13th 09, 04:30 PM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
bildan
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Posts: 646
Default Basic question

On Feb 13, 7:39*am, R wrote:
wrote:
As I have only ever flown Cessnas, I have a basic question. *When
flying a stick plane like an RV-7. *What hand do people fly with? *If I have to learn to use the left
hand I will.


Thanks


Barry


Learn to fly using either hand on the yoke or stick.
There are very few reasons to use two hands on the yoke or stick, if,
ever, in most applications.
For most operations only one hand is ever needed to manipulate the
control yoke or stick, and usually only a couple of fingers at that,
leaving the other hand free for the throttle and radios, or, switches
and other adjustments.
If you ever advance to an actual airplanes you will find that various
combinations are required according to the configuration of the
particular airplane you are in, or, the particular seat you may be in.
Often times, no hand, is required on the control yoke or stick and you
may be able to use just a single fingertip to effectively apply the
desired inputs.
Learn to lightly manipulate or caress the controls with small and
gradual inputs.

Go take a flying lesson in a real airplane.


Of course, learn to fly with either hand. Real pilots do.

Just to relate my experience as a flight instructor in gliders which
all have control sticks - many pilots transitioning to gliders from
yoke airplanes have trouble with the stick. It took me awhile to
understand what was giving them problems.

The big thing seems to be that the important fiddly stuff is on the
left side of the cockpit in stick equipped aircraft but on the right
in control yoke aircraft.

I don't know why it should be but it seems pilots trained in stick
equipped aircraft have less trouble transitioning to control yokes
than the other way around.

In any event, once I point this out, and the pilot thinks about it,
the problem seems to go away. Some will use both hands on the stick
with their left on top so it can release the stick when reaching for a
left side control leaving the right on the stick.


  #4  
Old February 13th 09, 04:59 PM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
Wayne Paul
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 905
Default Basic question

wrote in message
...
As I have only ever flown Cessnas, I have a basic question. When
flying a stick plane like an RV-7. What hand do people fly with? On
a yoke I generally used 2 but if I had to use one to do something else
I would keep the left on the yoke. However, I don't know how
comfortable I would feel flying exclusively with the left hand on a
stick. I ask as I am playing on flight simulator and would prefer to
learn how it is actually done. If I have to learn to use the left
hand I will.

Thanks

Barry



Personally I fly with my right hand. However, flying with my left hand
isn't a problem when adjusting power setting, etc in a yoke configured
aircraft like a Cessna.

Military fighter/attack aircraft are configured to be flown with your right
hand on the stick and left hand operates throttles, speed brakes, gear, etc.
This configuration is also standard in most old tail draggers like Champs
and Cubs. Most sailplane controls also follow this configuration. Right
hand on the stick, left hand operates the gear, spoilers and flaps.

I have flown with military pilots who were left handed and noticed that they
easily adapted to using the right hand configuration. I don't see why
adapting to an aircraft configured with a left and stick should be a
problem. The most important thing is to develop a light touch on the stick.
http://www.soaridaho.com/photogaller.../17900_MSL.jpg
In the picture I am flying with my left hand while operating the camera with
my right. Not a problem except a bit too much pressure on right rudder
peddle. (On this Schreder HP-14 sailplane the flaps are operated with the
left hand and the gear with the right hand.)

Wayne
HP-14 "6F"
http://www.soaridaho.com/Schreder


  #6  
Old February 13th 09, 05:21 PM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
Wayne Paul
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 905
Default Basic question


"Frank Stutzman" wrote in message
...
wrote:


.... Snip ...
--
Frank Stutzman
Bonanza N494B "Hula Girl"
Boise, ID


Frank,

Where do you keep your Bonanza (Boise, Nampa, Caldwell?)

Wayne
HP-14 based at Nampa
http://www.soaridaho.com/

PS. I tried to email you directly, but it bounced.


  #8  
Old February 13th 09, 06:07 PM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
R
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8
Default Basic question

Barry:

Since, you are posting from a velocity.net address, and to build on
bildan's and Wayne Paul's comments:

When the weather improves after April 15 why don't you get to either,
Dart Field near Mayville, NY, (Airport ID: D79)
or
Brokenstraw Airport near Youngsville, PA, (Airport ID: P15)
Take an "introductory gilder ride" and learn how a stick feels and how
to use it. The cost of an introductory glider ride is quite reasonable
and you will be riding with an experienced commercial pilot or a CFIG
glider instructor.
It will make you a better pilot when you encounter other planes that
have a stick or have yokes. If you build upon that glider experience it
will make you a better power pilot. You will interchange the use of the
hand on the glider's spoilers for the use of the hand with the throttle
in a powered plane. The use of the stick or yoke and your hands will
eventually come naturally when you stop worrying about it.
  #9  
Old February 13th 09, 07:00 PM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
Orval Fairbairn[_2_]
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Posts: 530
Default Basic question

In article
,
wrote:

As I have only ever flown Cessnas, I have a basic question. When
flying a stick plane like an RV-7. What hand do people fly with? On
a yoke I generally used 2 but if I had to use one to do something else
I would keep the left on the yoke. However, I don't know how
comfortable I would feel flying exclusively with the left hand on a
stick. I ask as I am playing on flight simulator and would prefer to
learn how it is actually done. If I have to learn to use the left
hand I will.

Thanks

Barry


Either hand works equally well. I have a 2-plc side-by-side and fly with
left hand on stick, right hand on throttle. Some of my friends fly their
SX-300s from the right seat.

The AF Academy had their TG-14 Ximango motor gliders set up with the PIC
in the right seat, so the stick and throttle configuration resembles
that of fighters.

The big things to remember when transitioning up to an RV-7 (moreso with
a Glasair) a

1. You fly them with your fingertips/toe tips, by pressure, not control
movement

2. You have to plan much further ahead of the plane, as things go by
three times as fast.

3. You will realize that the Cessnas/Pipers, Beeches handle like trucks,
compared to your homebuilt.

--
Remove _'s from email address to talk to me.
  #10  
Old February 13th 09, 07:15 PM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
cavelamb[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 257
Default Basic question

Orval Fairbairn wrote:
In article
,
wrote:

As I have only ever flown Cessnas, I have a basic question. When
flying a stick plane like an RV-7. What hand do people fly with? On
a yoke I generally used 2 but if I had to use one to do something else
I would keep the left on the yoke. However, I don't know how
comfortable I would feel flying exclusively with the left hand on a
stick. I ask as I am playing on flight simulator and would prefer to
learn how it is actually done. If I have to learn to use the left
hand I will.

Thanks

Barry


Either hand works equally well. I have a 2-plc side-by-side and fly with
left hand on stick, right hand on throttle. Some of my friends fly their
SX-300s from the right seat.

The AF Academy had their TG-14 Ximango motor gliders set up with the PIC
in the right seat, so the stick and throttle configuration resembles
that of fighters.

The big things to remember when transitioning up to an RV-7 (moreso with
a Glasair) a

1. You fly them with your fingertips/toe tips, by pressure, not control
movement

2. You have to plan much further ahead of the plane, as things go by
three times as fast.

3. You will realize that the Cessnas/Pipers, Beeches handle like trucks,
compared to your homebuilt.


3. Continued
If all you have ever flown is Cessna and Piper (stable airplanes) your
homebuilt will feel totally squirrelly - until you get used to it.

THEN the spam cans will handle like trucks...
 




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