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Time to medical help



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 19th 08, 07:36 PM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
Hilton
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 118
Default Time to medical help

Hi,

I have a question from a friend. Her daughters have nut allergies. She
wants to know how long it takes from cruise (41K?) to a gate from the time
they notify the crew of a medical emergency (e.g. anaphylactic shock).
Obviously it depends on their proximity to a suitable airport, but I'd like
to hear from the airline pilots in this group. She is specifically
referring to a flight from the SF Bay Area to the NY area.

She does have some medication/injection to give them, but obviously she
would want real medical treatment ASAP.

As a pilot, what kind of descent rates can a 737/A320/747 etc get in a
medical mergency? Would this descent rate be different than a descent for
decompression?

Thanks,

Hilton


Ads
  #2  
Old February 19th 08, 08:11 PM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
Sam Spade
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,326
Default Time to medical help

Hilton wrote:
Hi,

I have a question from a friend. Her daughters have nut allergies. She
wants to know how long it takes from cruise (41K?) to a gate from the time
they notify the crew of a medical emergency (e.g. anaphylactic shock).
Obviously it depends on their proximity to a suitable airport, but I'd like
to hear from the airline pilots in this group. She is specifically
referring to a flight from the SF Bay Area to the NY area.

She does have some medication/injection to give them, but obviously she
would want real medical treatment ASAP.

As a pilot, what kind of descent rates can a 737/A320/747 etc get in a
medical mergency? Would this descent rate be different than a descent for
decompression?

Thanks,

Hilton


No one is going to do a classic decompression descent for any medical
emergency.

But, they can use the speed breaks, bust the 250 limit, etc. If the
weather is crummy below that limits it, too.

But, generally 20 to 30 minutes to be on the ground.
  #3  
Old February 19th 08, 11:19 PM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
Mxsmanic
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Posts: 9,169
Default Time to medical help

Hilton writes:

I have a question from a friend. Her daughters have nut allergies. She
wants to know how long it takes from cruise (41K?) to a gate from the time
they notify the crew of a medical emergency (e.g. anaphylactic shock).
Obviously it depends on their proximity to a suitable airport, but I'd like
to hear from the airline pilots in this group. She is specifically
referring to a flight from the SF Bay Area to the NY area.


At least 30-40 minutes. If she is indeed prone to anaphylactic shock, she'll
need to be treated on board. And there may not be any airport with suitably
elaborate treatment services available within a short distance. If it happens
over the Rockies, it's going to be a lot longer.

As a pilot, what kind of descent rates can a 737/A320/747 etc get in a
medical mergency?


The same rate it can get in a non-emergency. The structural limits of the
aircraft do not change in emergencies. The kinetic energy represented by high
altitude and high speed must be dissipated in every case.

Would this descent rate be different than a descent for decompression?


No.

While the crew of the flight may make every effort to expedite the landing of
the aircraft at a suitable airport should that be deemed necessary, that
effort will not extend to endangering the flight, crew, and passengers. If a
choice must be made between endangering the entire flight and delaying landing
to treat your friend's daughters, her daughters will lose. If your friend
imagines the pilots putting the aircraft into a wild dive to get to an
airport, she has been watching too many movies.

In every case, the emphasis must be on emergency treatment while in the air.
That's why many aircraft must carry defibrillators now.
  #4  
Old February 20th 08, 02:50 AM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
Dave S
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 406
Default Time to medical help

Hilton wrote:
Hi,

I have a question from a friend. Her daughters have nut allergies. She
wants to know how long it takes from cruise (41K?) to a gate from the time
they notify the crew of a medical emergency (e.g. anaphylactic shock).
Obviously it depends on their proximity to a suitable airport, but I'd like
to hear from the airline pilots in this group. She is specifically
referring to a flight from the SF Bay Area to the NY area.

She does have some medication/injection to give them, but obviously she
would want real medical treatment ASAP.

As a pilot, what kind of descent rates can a 737/A320/747 etc get in a
medical mergency? Would this descent rate be different than a descent for
decompression?

Thanks,

Hilton



The nearest APPROPRIATE landing site may not be the closest (which you
have acknowledged). You may take up to 15 - 30 minutes to get to the
gate in such a situation. If someone is going to die in 5 minutes, then
it doesnt really matter if its 15 minutes or 50 to get to the gate.

They are not going to do a dive/emergency descent for a medical
emergency (in the manner that they would for a cabin
breach/decompression. Those rapid descents are just to get below 10,000
feet then you stablize the flight path and form a plan (the emergency is
mostly over, from a pressurization standpoint then). An overly abrupt
descent can also interfere with providing care to the ill passenger.

If she is a severe anaphalactic, the appropriate course of action is to
ALWAYS ALWAYS ALWAYS have her epi-pen with her, and not be hesitant
about using it if a true anaphylactic event takes place. Have TWO, in
case something happens to the first one. And thats for each potential
patient.

That IS the treatment. Thats the same drug paramedics or ER staff would
administer. There are other nice things, like benadryl, pepcid and
steroids, but for the real deal, Epinepherine/Adrenaline is the 1st line
priority treatment for anaphylaxis. After Epi.. its mostly a matter of
observing the patient...

Dave
  #5  
Old February 20th 08, 02:56 AM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
Robert M. Gary
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,767
Default Time to medical help

On Feb 19, 11:36*am, "Hilton" wrote:
Hi,

I have a question from a friend. *Her daughters have nut allergies. *She
wants to know how long it takes from cruise (41K?) to a gate from the time
they notify the crew of a medical emergency (e.g. anaphylactic shock).
Obviously it depends on their proximity to a suitable airport, but I'd like
to hear from the airline pilots in this group. *She is specifically
referring to a flight from the SF Bay Area to the NY area.

She does have some medication/injection to give them, but obviously she
would want real medical treatment ASAP.

As a pilot, what kind of descent rates can a 737/A320/747 etc get in a
medical mergency? *Would this descent rate be different than a descent for
decompression?


Have her bring an Epipen. In fact they may have them onboard. Our Boy
Scout Troop has several (we have several Drs in the Troop so they
provided them). Once she takes the Epipen there should be no medical
emergency. We have a couple boys in our troop that have severe (life
threatening peanut allergies).

-Robert
  #6  
Old February 20th 08, 04:07 AM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
Hilton
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 118
Default Time to medical help

Robert, Dave,

Thank you for your info, I'll pass that along. She has three daughters,
first is allergic to sesame seeds, second to nuts, and third to dairy!

Oh, and she's severely afraid of flying (since the birth of he daughters).
I try to ease her fears and describe the departure out of SJC etc so that
she can anticipate the flaps up, right turn, throttle back, level out, add
power, climb, turn - it's all standard in the departure. It hasn't really
helped - I'll be amazed if she actually gets on the flight to JFK.

Thanks again.

Hilton


"Dave S" wrote in message
...
Hilton wrote:
Hi,

I have a question from a friend. Her daughters have nut allergies. She
wants to know how long it takes from cruise (41K?) to a gate from the
time they notify the crew of a medical emergency (e.g. anaphylactic
shock). Obviously it depends on their proximity to a suitable airport,
but I'd like to hear from the airline pilots in this group. She is
specifically referring to a flight from the SF Bay Area to the NY area.

She does have some medication/injection to give them, but obviously she
would want real medical treatment ASAP.

As a pilot, what kind of descent rates can a 737/A320/747 etc get in a
medical mergency? Would this descent rate be different than a descent
for decompression?

Thanks,

Hilton



The nearest APPROPRIATE landing site may not be the closest (which you
have acknowledged). You may take up to 15 - 30 minutes to get to the gate
in such a situation. If someone is going to die in 5 minutes, then it
doesnt really matter if its 15 minutes or 50 to get to the gate.

They are not going to do a dive/emergency descent for a medical emergency
(in the manner that they would for a cabin breach/decompression. Those
rapid descents are just to get below 10,000 feet then you stablize the
flight path and form a plan (the emergency is mostly over, from a
pressurization standpoint then). An overly abrupt descent can also
interfere with providing care to the ill passenger.

If she is a severe anaphalactic, the appropriate course of action is to
ALWAYS ALWAYS ALWAYS have her epi-pen with her, and not be hesitant about
using it if a true anaphylactic event takes place. Have TWO, in case
something happens to the first one. And thats for each potential patient.

That IS the treatment. Thats the same drug paramedics or ER staff would
administer. There are other nice things, like benadryl, pepcid and
steroids, but for the real deal, Epinepherine/Adrenaline is the 1st line
priority treatment for anaphylaxis. After Epi.. its mostly a matter of
observing the patient...

Dave



  #7  
Old February 20th 08, 04:08 PM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
Mxsmanic
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,169
Default Time to medical help

Robert M. Gary writes:

Have her bring an Epipen. In fact they may have them onboard. Our Boy
Scout Troop has several (we have several Drs in the Troop so they
provided them).


Federal law prohibits the dispensing of Epipen without a prescription.
  #8  
Old February 20th 08, 04:28 PM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
Sam Spade
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,326
Default Time to medical help

Mxsmanic wrote:
Robert M. Gary writes:


Have her bring an Epipen. In fact they may have them onboard. Our Boy
Scout Troop has several (we have several Drs in the Troop so they
provided them).



Federal law prohibits the dispensing of Epipen without a prescription.


Shows how much you know about airline medical kits.
  #9  
Old February 20th 08, 10:07 PM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
Mxsmanic
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,169
Default Time to medical help

Sam Spade writes:

Shows how much you know about airline medical kits.


I know that they are intended for use by airlines aboard aircraft, not for use
by Scout troups.
  #10  
Old February 20th 08, 10:54 PM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
Robert M. Gary
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,767
Default Time to medical help

On Feb 20, 8:08*am, Mxsmanic wrote:
Robert M. Gary writes:
Have her bring an Epipen. In fact they may have them onboard. Our Boy
Scout Troop has several (we have several Drs in the Troop so they
provided them).


Federal law prohibits the dispensing of Epipen without a prescription.


So are you saying the Epipens that several of the dads in the troop
who are medical doctors put in the kit are fake? I'm not following
what you are saying.
Are you saying that all the emergency drugs in an ambulance are
available without a Dr's concent?

-Robert
 




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