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Help With My training



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 1st 08, 07:08 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.aviation.student
Gezellig
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Posts: 463
Default Help With My training

Last Friday, I went up for an introductory flight lesson out of the San
Carlos airport. WOW!!!!!! I have been dreaming about learning to fly
since I was in my teens. All the time I was in the air the lines of
that famous poem kept going through my head "Oh, I have slipped the
surly bonds of Earth.........". When we landed (I didn't want to ever
come down :-)) the instructor asked me if I thought I would be
interested in flying and I told him that wild horses couldn't stop me
now and proceeded to sign-up for two flight days the following week. I
had my second flight day, this afternoon, practicing a variety of turns
while maintaining (or making attempts to) altitude.

One question I had for the instructors out there - what I seemed to find
more awkward than anything was steering the nose wheel using my feet on
the rudder pedals. The people in the control tower must have thought I
looked like a wounded bird taxing out to hold position before takeoff.
Is there some 'trick' to getting the hang of this, so often I would be
tempted to reach up and turn the control yoke but resisted the
temptation (due to its futility).

Once again, thank you all for your posts on this newsgroup. I finally
just made myself go out and start. I fly again, on Friday and will keep
you posted. Meanwhile I am going to pour over some of the aviation
training books to review some of the things I learned today. Just
starting out, but I am so excited!
Ads
  #2  
Old May 1st 08, 07:45 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.aviation.student
Andy Hawkins
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Posts: 200
Default Help With My training

Hi,

In article ,
wrote:
One question I had for the instructors out there - what I seemed to find
more awkward than anything was steering the nose wheel using my feet on
the rudder pedals. The people in the control tower must have thought I
looked like a wounded bird taxing out to hold position before takeoff.
Is there some 'trick' to getting the hang of this, so often I would be
tempted to reach up and turn the control yoke but resisted the
temptation (due to its futility).


I'm not an instructor, but as a student myself I can say that you will get
the hang of it. Like any new skill, it's just a question of getting to grips
with it. Soon enough it becomes second nature.

Stick with it, and enjoy it!

Andy
  #3  
Old May 1st 08, 08:42 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.aviation.student
Chas[_4_]
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Posts: 1
Default Help With My training


"Andy Hawkins" wrote in message
...
Hi,

In article ,
wrote:
One question I had for the instructors out there - what I seemed to find
more awkward than anything was steering the nose wheel using my feet on
the rudder pedals. The people in the control tower must have thought I
looked like a wounded bird taxing out to hold position before takeoff.
Is there some 'trick' to getting the hang of this, so often I would be
tempted to reach up and turn the control yoke but resisted the
temptation (due to its futility).


I'm not an instructor, but as a student myself I can say that you will get
the hang of it. Like any new skill, it's just a question of getting to
grips
with it. Soon enough it becomes second nature.

Stick with it, and enjoy it!

Andy


Had the same problem. Muscle memory from car driving. My instructor had me
keep my hand off the yoke for a taxi or two and it all fell into place.

Have fun

Chuck

  #4  
Old May 1st 08, 08:49 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.aviation.student
WingFlaps
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Posts: 621
Default Help With My training

On May 2, 6:08*am, Gezellig wrote:


One question I had for the instructors out there - what I seemed to find
more awkward than anything was steering the nose wheel using my feet on
the rudder pedals. *The people in the control tower must have thought I
looked like a wounded bird taxing out to hold position before takeoff.
Is there some 'trick' to getting the hang of this, so often I would be
tempted to reach up and turn the control yoke but resisted the
temptation (due to its futility).


Some planes are worse (looser) than others. It may help to gently
apply pressure from both feet at the same time all the time -so both
legs are giving feedback as you steer. (You feel the pressure on the
other leg from the one pushing the rudder pedals). Hope this makes
sense. One other thing, ask you instrcutor if he's got his feet on the
pedals. Some are buggers for not letting go of control and are
pressing without realiizing. I had one who would give a huge rudder
kick everytime he shifted his ass on the seat!

Cheers

  #5  
Old May 1st 08, 08:52 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.aviation.student
gatt[_3_]
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Posts: 193
Default Help With My training

Gezellig wrote:

One question I had for the instructors out there - what I seemed to find
more awkward than anything was steering the nose wheel using my feet on
the rudder pedals. The people in the control tower must have thought I
looked like a wounded bird taxing out to hold position before takeoff.
Is there some 'trick' to getting the hang of this


Your feet will get the hang of it with practice. Once you're moving
it's more about holding the pressure (sort of like the gas pedal in your
car to hold a speed) than moving the pedal.

As with all control inputs in airplanes, generally if you're reacting or
"chasing" the plane you're trying too hard. You'll get the feel of what
keeps the plane pointed in the right direction and hold it with your feet.

Also, make sure you're not stepping on the toe brakes. That not only
wears down the brake pads, it exaggerates your turn and causes you to
have to make more dramatic corrections.

Cheers, and good flying!

-c
  #6  
Old May 1st 08, 08:53 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.aviation.student
Steve Foley
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Posts: 563
Default Help With My training

"Gezellig" wrote in message
...

One question I had for the instructors out there - what I seemed to find
more awkward than anything was steering the nose wheel using my feet on
the rudder pedals.


If you've ever ridden a flexible-flyer/runner sled, or a home-made go-kart,
you ended up steering with your feet.

The problem is that the plane controls backward from these two vehicles. On
a sled/go-kart, you turn left by pushing with your right foot.

I 'cured' myself by chair-flying. Sit in a chair. Turn your head to the
left, and push your left foot down. Turn Right - push right foot. My wife
thought I was nuts. Actually, she still does.

  #7  
Old May 1st 08, 09:06 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
JGalban via AviationKB.com
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Posts: 356
Default Help With My training

Gezellig wrote:
One question I had for the instructors out there - what I seemed to find
more awkward than anything was steering the nose wheel using my feet on
the rudder pedals. The people in the control tower must have thought I
looked like a wounded bird taxing out to hold position before takeoff.
Is there some 'trick' to getting the hang of this, so often I would be
tempted to reach up and turn the control yoke but resisted the
temptation (due to its futility).


This is something that you'll get used to over time. I had a really bad
habit of reaching for the yoke to steer. If it was a calm day (i.e. didn't
need to position the controls for the wind) my instructor made me put my
hands on the seat under my legs while taxiing. This helped me to concentrate
on using my feet ot steer.

Also, if you're flying a Cessna, they use a flexible bungee to connect the
rudder pedals to the steering. This means that it takes a second or two for
your control input to have a reaction on the nosewheel. Practice
anticipating what your next move will be. Trying to immediately correct a
slight departure from your path will lead to overcorrection if you don't keep
this in mind. You'll end up wallowing from side to side on the taxiway as
you overcorrect from one side to the other.

John Galban=====N4BQ (PA28-180)

--
Message posted via http://www.aviationkb.com

  #8  
Old May 1st 08, 11:18 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.aviation.student
F. Baum
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Posts: 244
Default Help With My training

On May 1, 12:08*pm, Gezellig wrote:

One question I had for the instructors out there - what I seemed to find
more awkward than anything was steering the nose wheel using my feet on
the rudder pedals. *The people in the control tower must have thought I
looked like a wounded bird taxing out to hold position before takeoff.
Is there some 'trick' to getting the hang of this, so often I would be
tempted to reach up and turn the control yoke but resisted the
temptation (due to its futility).


G, As others have suggested, you arent the only one. I went through
about 12000 hours of only flying airliners and when I got back into
light plane flying (Big mistake to wait that long) one of my biggest
problems was steering with the feet again. There will be more awkward
stuff during your flight training . The hands in the lap thing works
fine. Good Luck,
Frank
  #9  
Old May 2nd 08, 03:50 AM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.aviation.student
Gezellig[_2_]
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Posts: 45
Default Help With My training

F. Baum presented the following explanation :
On May 1, 12:08*pm, Gezellig wrote:

One question I had for the instructors out there - what I seemed to find
more awkward than anything was steering the nose wheel using my feet on
the rudder pedals. *The people in the control tower must have thought I
looked like a wounded bird taxing out to hold position before takeoff.
Is there some 'trick' to getting the hang of this, so often I would be
tempted to reach up and turn the control yoke but resisted the
temptation (due to its futility).


G, As others have suggested, you arent the only one. I went through
about 12000 hours of only flying airliners and when I got back into
light plane flying (Big mistake to wait that long) one of my biggest
problems was steering with the feet again. There will be more awkward
stuff during your flight training . The hands in the lap thing works
fine. Good Luck,
Frank


WOW you guys are great, thanks for all the pointers, I learned sumpin
from everyone. I'm chair sitting, sledding and reading all at once!


  #10  
Old May 2nd 08, 04:03 AM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.aviation.student
Morgans[_2_]
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Posts: 3,924
Default Help With My training


"Gezellig" wrote

WOW you guys are great, thanks for all the pointers, I learned sumpin
from everyone. I'm chair sitting, sledding and reading all at once!


Just remember that it steers backwards, as compared to a runner sled! g
--
Jim in NC
 




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