A aviation & planes forum. AviationBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » AviationBanter forum » rec.aviation newsgroups » Instrument Flight Rules
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

ILS approach and VOR Alpha Approach video



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old May 17th 08, 03:31 AM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 838
Default ILS approach and VOR Alpha Approach video

Knocked out a couple of approaches today in IMC conditions. Was cut
short due to a vacuum system problem (note, not the pump).

Ceilings 1500 at KJAN and 1400 on my approach into KMBO.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RCvDb3mCAf8

Just after entering the clouds, saw my attitude indicator show an
extraordinary pitch up. Quick scan of my airspeed and VSI did not
confirm. Since I was IMC decided to continue approach and just work
my partial panel skills. Turning back wasn't an option.

In the full scheme of things, no big deal.

Camera was placed on glare shield for the outside view since I didn't
have a passenger It would have been nice to capture the
instrumentation discrepancies if anything for others to see it happen
under real conditions .but somebody had to man the shop and reaching
for the camera myself was not an option in IMC..

After settling in, just contacted approach and advised them I didn't
have a vacuum system, and would use ground track for my heading
directions. When asked my intentions, I said to continue my ILS
approach into KJAN and then VOR Alpha back to Madison with vectors. I
had in my mind if it was too much work, just would do a full stop at
KJAN.

ATC asked if I needed any assistance and I declined as everything
really was under control.

Used my VSI as my "attitude indicator" figuring if it was level,
airplane was level. If it pointed down, then I figured my nose was
pointed down, and vice versa for pitch up.

While I could have used the TC for bank information, I found it much
easier in my scan just to use the ground track on the Garminm 430. If
it changed, I figured the plane was banking.

Problem I think (still getting this checked into) is the vacuum
regulator as my vacuum gauge was reading 6 out of possible high of
7. Time will tell...

Allen
Ads
  #2  
Old May 17th 08, 01:08 PM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
BillJ
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 75
Default ILS approach and VOR Alpha Approach video

wrote:
Knocked out a couple of approaches today in IMC conditions. Was cut
short due to a vacuum system problem (note, not the pump).

Ceilings 1500 at KJAN and 1400 on my approach into KMBO.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RCvDb3mCAf8

Just after entering the clouds, saw my attitude indicator show an
extraordinary pitch up. Quick scan of my airspeed and VSI did not
confirm. Since I was IMC decided to continue approach and just work
my partial panel skills. Turning back wasn't an option.

In the full scheme of things, no big deal.

Camera was placed on glare shield for the outside view since I didn't
have a passenger It would have been nice to capture the
instrumentation discrepancies if anything for others to see it happen
under real conditions .but somebody had to man the shop and reaching
for the camera myself was not an option in IMC..

After settling in, just contacted approach and advised them I didn't
have a vacuum system, and would use ground track for my heading
directions. When asked my intentions, I said to continue my ILS
approach into KJAN and then VOR Alpha back to Madison with vectors. I
had in my mind if it was too much work, just would do a full stop at
KJAN.

ATC asked if I needed any assistance and I declined as everything
really was under control.

Used my VSI as my "attitude indicator" figuring if it was level,
airplane was level. If it pointed down, then I figured my nose was
pointed down, and vice versa for pitch up.

While I could have used the TC for bank information, I found it much
easier in my scan just to use the ground track on the Garminm 430. If
it changed, I figured the plane was banking.

Problem I think (still getting this checked into) is the vacuum
regulator as my vacuum gauge was reading 6 out of possible high of
7. Time will tell...

Allen

Maybe a collapsed hose?
  #3  
Old May 17th 08, 01:22 PM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 838
Default ILS approach and VOR Alpha Approach video

On May 17, 7:08*am, BillJ wrote:

Maybe a collapsed hose?


All lines were checked as I experienced this anomaly in VFR
conditions, and it "went away" so we figured like you, a crimped hose
somewhere in the lines became un-crimped when things were poked
around. This happened about 6 flights ago, so I really thought it was
fixed.

  #5  
Old May 20th 08, 05:01 AM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
Andrew Sarangan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 382
Default ILS approach and VOR Alpha Approach video

On May 19, 12:51 pm, Ross wrote:
wrote:

snip



Used my VSI as my "attitude indicator" figuring if it was level,
airplane was level. If it pointed down, then I figured my nose was
pointed down, and vice versa for pitch up.


snip

Allen


Why wouldn't you use airspeed or altitude for pitch? It responds faster.
--


When you are trying to maintain constant altitude (or constant
anything) a differential instrument is better than an absolute
instrument. Although the VSI does have a lag, for small changes it
should not be big factor.



  #6  
Old May 20th 08, 01:23 PM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
Ross
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 463
Default ILS approach and VOR Alpha Approach video

Andrew Sarangan wrote:
On May 19, 12:51 pm, Ross wrote:
wrote:

snip



Used my VSI as my "attitude indicator" figuring if it was level,
airplane was level. If it pointed down, then I figured my nose was
pointed down, and vice versa for pitch up.

snip

Allen

Why wouldn't you use airspeed or altitude for pitch? It responds faster.
--


When you are trying to maintain constant altitude (or constant
anything) a differential instrument is better than an absolute
instrument. Although the VSI does have a lag, for small changes it
should not be big factor.



Why is a differential instrument better? If I wanted to know if I was
level I would look at my altimeter. If I stay at 6000' I am level. If my
airspeed is faster then I am going down or slower then I am going up.
Now that I think about it airspeed might be better, since turbulence
could be bouncing me up and down and I could be chasing that.

--

Regards, Ross
C-172F 180HP
KSWI
  #7  
Old May 21st 08, 12:04 AM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 838
Default ILS approach and VOR Alpha Approach video

On May 19, 11:51*am, Ross wrote:

Why wouldn't you use airspeed or altitude for pitch? It responds faster.


Not a matter of response I was looking for, but for me, being the
position of the needle being "level" visually was a cue that I was
level flight. If it pointed down visually, I would visually see the
nose of the plane down, and vice versa for climbs.

I just found it visually easier to interpret the attitude of the plane
using the VSI needle.

Of course, like you said airspeed will give you pitch information as
well as the RPM of the engine to even expand further (good
consideration for icing situations in my head anyway).

As Ross pointed out altimeter would also work, as after all an
assigned altitude is just that, straight and level, if it's going down
your descending and so on but VISUALLY, the VSI gave me a better
picture of my airplane attitude (pitch)

In my simple mind it worked well anyway :-)))
  #8  
Old May 21st 08, 07:58 AM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
Hilton
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 118
Default ILS approach and VOR Alpha Approach video

I just found it visually easier to interpret the attitude of the plane
using the VSI needle.


If you're doing this in IMC, I hope you have an IVSI.

Hilton


  #9  
Old May 21st 08, 01:46 PM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 838
Default ILS approach and VOR Alpha Approach video

On May 21, 1:58*am, "Hilton" wrote:

If you're doing this in IMC, I hope you have an IVSI.


No...... For those that don't know what IVSI is, as I had to look it
up, the IVSI means Instant Vertical Speed Indicater in the above.

The VSI was only a "visual aide" to help verify the trends of my other
gauges. Once I was straight and level, the altimeter was my primary
and VSI was secondary, but a visual to show I was indeed level (thus
me calling my "attitude indicator").

Any change to the sound of my engine would prompt me to look at the
altimeter first and then my VSI, and if the VSI was pointed up, then
it was easier to see I was trending up which meant I was pitched up.
(just gave me a better visual) which of course make me make
appropriate trim settings or control input changes.

Again, my simple ways of dealing with an unusual problem, may not work
for others, but my outcome was of such it worked for me. Just a tool
in my took kit I found fit for my needs.
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
ILS approach and VOR Alpha Approach video [email protected] Piloting 4 May 17th 08 01:19 PM
Garmin 430 rquestion- does the approach always have to be activated via "activate approach"? Terence Wilson Instrument Flight Rules 46 February 18th 08 05:46 PM
Where was that video: Jumbo jet on very low approach over a beach Al Dykes General Aviation 2 November 7th 07 03:36 PM
Video of VOR A approach into MBO in actual A Lieberman Instrument Flight Rules 1 May 2nd 05 03:35 PM
Completing the Non-precision approach as a Visual Approach John Clonts Instrument Flight Rules 45 November 20th 03 05:20 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:46 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2020 AviationBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.