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CFI oral intel



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 29th 08, 03:21 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.aviation.student
gatt[_4_]
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Posts: 12
Default CFI oral intel


One of the folks around the hangar took his CFI practical last week. He
had his AGI so they threw out all of the Fundamentals of Instruction
stuff entirely during the oral.

A question the examiner asked him: "You're flying cross-country and
trimmed at 110 knots. You die, and the engine quits. At what airspeed
will the aircraft strike the ground?"

Another was, "You're turning final and you enter a cross-control stall.
Is it better to be in a slip, or a skid?"

-c
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  #2  
Old May 29th 08, 03:45 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.aviation.student
Gezellig
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Posts: 463
Default CFI oral intel

On Thu, 29 May 2008 07:21:20 -0700, gatt wrote:

One of the folks around the hangar took his CFI practical last week. He
had his AGI so they threw out all of the Fundamentals of Instruction
stuff entirely during the oral.

A question the examiner asked him: "You're flying cross-country and
trimmed at 110 knots. You die, and the engine quits. At what airspeed
will the aircraft strike the ground?


That's easy, gatt. I wouldn't know.

Or care.
  #3  
Old May 29th 08, 03:47 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.aviation.student
gatt[_4_]
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Posts: 12
Default CFI oral intel

Gezellig wrote:
On Thu, 29 May 2008 07:21:20 -0700, gatt wrote:


A question the examiner asked him: "You're flying cross-country and
trimmed at 110 knots. You die, and the engine quits. At what airspeed
will the aircraft strike the ground?


That's easy, gatt. I wouldn't know.

Or care.


Ha! That was my thought: If I'm dead, what difference does it make?



  #4  
Old May 29th 08, 03:58 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.aviation.student
Bertie the Bunyip[_25_]
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Posts: 3,735
Default CFI oral intel

gatt wrote in
:


One of the folks around the hangar took his CFI practical last week.

He
had his AGI so they threw out all of the Fundamentals of Instruction
stuff entirely during the oral.

A question the examiner asked him: "You're flying cross-country and
trimmed at 110 knots. You die, and the engine quits. At what airspeed
will the aircraft strike the ground?"



He's obviously looking at getting an answer that it will be the same
speed, but that's not correct. It probably wouldn;'t be far off it, but
the thrust line and any up or down thrust will play a big part in what
the airplane settles at after the engine dies.

Another was, "You're turning final and you enter a cross-control

stall.
Is it better to be in a slip, or a skid?"


If you're asking, Slip.



Bertie
  #5  
Old May 29th 08, 04:13 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.aviation.student
gatt[_4_]
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Posts: 12
Default CFI oral intel

Bertie the Bunyip wrote:
gatt wrote in


A question the examiner asked him: "You're flying cross-country and
trimmed at 110 knots. You die, and the engine quits. At what airspeed
will the aircraft strike the ground?"



He's obviously looking at getting an answer that it will be the same
speed, but that's not correct. It probably wouldn;'t be far off it



The answer he apparently wanted was 110 knots, but I would have told him
-around- 110 knots.


Another was, "You're turning final and you enter a cross-control

stall. Is it better to be in a slip, or a skid?"

If you're asking, Slip.


That's what I'd have told him. (If you're in a 30-degree bank and your
outboard wing stalls you'll roll through wings-level but if your inboard
wing drops you're increasing your bank even further.)

I don't know what the examiner wanted to hear, but, that's the answer
I'd have given him.

-c
  #6  
Old May 29th 08, 04:14 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.aviation.student
Bertie the Bunyip[_25_]
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Posts: 3,735
Default CFI oral intel

gatt wrote in
:

Bertie the Bunyip wrote:
gatt wrote in


A question the examiner asked him: "You're flying cross-country and
trimmed at 110 knots. You die, and the engine quits. At what

airspeed
will the aircraft strike the ground?"



He's obviously looking at getting an answer that it will be the same
speed, but that's not correct. It probably wouldn;'t be far off it



The answer he apparently wanted was 110 knots, but I would have told

him
-around- 110 knots.


Another was, "You're turning final and you enter a cross-control

stall. Is it better to be in a slip, or a skid?"

If you're asking, Slip.


That's what I'd have told him. (If you're in a 30-degree bank and

your
outboard wing stalls you'll roll through wings-level but if your

inboard
wing drops you're increasing your bank even further.)

I don't know what the examiner wanted to hear, but, that's the answer
I'd have given him.

-c


Well, you're much more likely to spin out of a skid than a slip is what
he was getting at..



Bertie

  #7  
Old May 29th 08, 04:19 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.aviation.student
Dudley Henriques[_2_]
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Posts: 2,546
Default CFI oral intel

gatt wrote:

A question the examiner asked him: "You're flying cross-country and
trimmed at 110 knots. You die, and the engine quits. At what airspeed
will the aircraft strike the ground?"

Another was, "You're turning final and you enter a cross-control stall.
Is it better to be in a slip, or a skid?"

-c


These are reasonable questions.

The aircraft would attempt to regain and maintain the trim speed as it
descends. Whether or not it had the time to do that before ground impact
however would be dependent on the altitude remaining, so depending on
the altitude, the airspeed at impact might be short of the trim speed.

(This type of question is typical of FAA orals. They're looking for the
trim speed answer while completely neglecting the time and altitude
factors which to be accurate would have to be in the answer equation.

My advice to the person taking the oral would be to give the trim speed
answer, get the certificate, put it deep in the wallet and in your
pocket, then politely suggest to the fuzz that the altitude should be
included in the answer if not in the question itself :-)

A slipped cross control stall as relates to spin entry is FAR less
pro-spin than a skid entry.

--
Dudley Henriques
  #8  
Old May 29th 08, 04:54 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.aviation.student
Robert M. Gary
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Posts: 2,767
Default CFI oral intel

On May 29, 7:21*am, gatt wrote:
One of the folks around the hangar took his CFI practical last week. *He
had his AGI so they threw out all of the Fundamentals of Instruction
stuff entirely during the oral.


Huh, that's not right. There is nothing in the PTS that says you get
to skip the FOI stuff just because you have an AGI. The only thing you
get to skip is showing your FOI exam results. I had my AGI and
probably spent 5 hours of my CFI oral on FOI stuff.

-Robert, CFII, AGI
  #9  
Old May 29th 08, 04:55 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.aviation.student
Robert M. Gary
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Posts: 2,767
Default CFI oral intel

On May 29, 8:19*am, Dudley Henriques wrote:
gatt wrote:


The aircraft would attempt to regain and maintain the trim speed as it
descends. Whether or not it had the time to do that before ground impact
however would be dependent on the altitude remaining, so depending on
the altitude, the airspeed at impact might be short of the trim speed.


When I was a student pilot my instructor always said the plane will
seek its trim speed regardless of what you do with power settings.
I've actually never found that to be totally true in any plane I've
flown but it is grossly true.

-Robert
  #10  
Old May 29th 08, 07:46 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Jim[_13_]
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Posts: 11
Default CFI oral intel

On Thu, 29 May 2008 07:21:20 -0700, gatt
wrote:


One of the folks around the hangar took his CFI practical last week. He
had his AGI so they threw out all of the Fundamentals of Instruction
stuff entirely during the oral.

A question the examiner asked him: "You're flying cross-country and
trimmed at 110 knots. You die, and the engine quits. At what airspeed
will the aircraft strike the ground?"

Another was, "You're turning final and you enter a cross-control stall.
Is it better to be in a slip, or a skid?"

-c


Wow. I'm glad I have not been asked the first question. I think I
would have given an answer different from that given by the more
experienced folks here.

On the chance the plane went into a spiral dive, which I understand
can happen, I would have thought the plane would attempt to maintain
its trim AOA, but not its trim airspeed. I would likely have said the
plane would strike the ground -- if it had the necessary altitude, as
others have pointed out -- at approximately its trim AOA but at an
airspeed that might be a lot higher than its trim airspeed -- if the
wings did not come off before that.

Jim
 




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