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Logging x/c time and definition of landing



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 25th 03, 02:18 AM
Koopas Ly
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Default Logging x/c time and definition of landing

Howdy,

I was reading a short article on AOPA regarding logging x/c time.

By definition, cross-country time includes any flight with a landing
at any airport other than the departure airport; there is no distance
requirement. Reference: FAR 61.1(b)(3)

Of course, the catch is that:

To meet the requirements (except rotorcraft) for a private
certificate, a commercial certificate, and the instrument rating
(except instrument-helicopter), cross-country time requires a landing
at least 50 nm from the point of departure. FAR 61.1(b)(3)(ii)


Since I will probably go for an instrument rating soon, and then
commercial, should I indeed refrain from logging ALL flights with a
landing at an airport other than the departure airport in the x/c
column, regardless of distance?

For instance, I can't do touch and go's at my home airport (HNL), and
have to go to a nearby Class D airport to shoot landings. The
destination airport is definitely within 50 nm of HNL. Technically,
these flights count as x/c, even though I've never logged them as
such. Likewise, I've flown to airports only 47 nm away.

What do you guys/gals do? I guess it would depend on whether or not
you're persuing additional ratings.

Another question would be: what qualifies as a landing? A touch and
go is a landing, from experience. What about touching one wheel,
applying full power, and climbing away never to be seen again? Would
that count as a "landing"?

Alex
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  #2  
Old November 25th 03, 02:43 AM
rip
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Default

In 20+ years, I've only logged flights over 50 nm (from T.O. to landing)
as cross country. Makes the record keeping easier.

Rip

Koopas Ly wrote:
Howdy,

I was reading a short article on AOPA regarding logging x/c time.

By definition, cross-country time includes any flight with a landing
at any airport other than the departure airport; there is no distance
requirement. Reference: FAR 61.1(b)(3)

Of course, the catch is that:

To meet the requirements (except rotorcraft) for a private
certificate, a commercial certificate, and the instrument rating
(except instrument-helicopter), cross-country time requires a landing
at least 50 nm from the point of departure. FAR 61.1(b)(3)(ii)


Since I will probably go for an instrument rating soon, and then
commercial, should I indeed refrain from logging ALL flights with a
landing at an airport other than the departure airport in the x/c
column, regardless of distance?

For instance, I can't do touch and go's at my home airport (HNL), and
have to go to a nearby Class D airport to shoot landings. The
destination airport is definitely within 50 nm of HNL. Technically,
these flights count as x/c, even though I've never logged them as
such. Likewise, I've flown to airports only 47 nm away.

What do you guys/gals do? I guess it would depend on whether or not
you're persuing additional ratings.

Another question would be: what qualifies as a landing? A touch and
go is a landing, from experience. What about touching one wheel,
applying full power, and climbing away never to be seen again? Would
that count as a "landing"?

Alex


  #3  
Old November 25th 03, 02:46 AM
Dave S
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Default

If its not 50 miles, then its not XC for the purpose of the ratings that
require XC defined by the distance of 50 miles.. Wether you land or
not makes no difference if its under 50. I would log every flight you
make, so you can use the time to your advantage.

Instead of flying up to Dillinham all the time, why dont you grab a life
jacket and do some island hopping to build up your XC time? I would LOVE
to live back over there in the islands and go flying around there all
the time.

Dave

Koopas Ly wrote:
Howdy,

I was reading a short article on AOPA regarding logging x/c time.

By definition, cross-country time includes any flight with a landing
at any airport other than the departure airport; there is no distance
requirement. Reference: FAR 61.1(b)(3)

Of course, the catch is that:

To meet the requirements (except rotorcraft) for a private
certificate, a commercial certificate, and the instrument rating
(except instrument-helicopter), cross-country time requires a landing
at least 50 nm from the point of departure. FAR 61.1(b)(3)(ii)


Since I will probably go for an instrument rating soon, and then
commercial, should I indeed refrain from logging ALL flights with a
landing at an airport other than the departure airport in the x/c
column, regardless of distance?

For instance, I can't do touch and go's at my home airport (HNL), and
have to go to a nearby Class D airport to shoot landings. The
destination airport is definitely within 50 nm of HNL. Technically,
these flights count as x/c, even though I've never logged them as
such. Likewise, I've flown to airports only 47 nm away.

What do you guys/gals do? I guess it would depend on whether or not
you're persuing additional ratings.

Another question would be: what qualifies as a landing? A touch and
go is a landing, from experience. What about touching one wheel,
applying full power, and climbing away never to be seen again? Would
that count as a "landing"?

Alex


  #4  
Old November 25th 03, 03:03 AM
Matthew Waugh
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Posts: n/a
Default

As best I can tell the "any airports a cross-country" is only useful for
qualifying for Part 135 PIC (and I guess Part 121 - never looked). So if you
plan to want to meet the 1200TT, 500XC for Part 135, start tracking.

If you plan to do much flying at all, get an electronic logbook. Insurance
companies, the FAA, employers all want time tracked in different and
byzantine ways and a paper logbook will never keep up, you'll always have to
go back and add up the numbers of hours you have in complex, high
performance aircraft within the past 90, 180 and 2000 days, or high
performance seaplane landings at night.

Mat

--
Matthew Waugh
Comm. SEL MEL, CFI-AI
http://home.nc.rr.com/mwaugh/learn2fly/index.htm

"Koopas Ly" wrote in message
om...
Howdy,

I was reading a short article on AOPA regarding logging x/c time.

By definition, cross-country time includes any flight with a landing
at any airport other than the departure airport; there is no distance
requirement. Reference: FAR 61.1(b)(3)

Of course, the catch is that:

To meet the requirements (except rotorcraft) for a private
certificate, a commercial certificate, and the instrument rating
(except instrument-helicopter), cross-country time requires a landing
at least 50 nm from the point of departure. FAR 61.1(b)(3)(ii)


Since I will probably go for an instrument rating soon, and then
commercial, should I indeed refrain from logging ALL flights with a
landing at an airport other than the departure airport in the x/c
column, regardless of distance?

For instance, I can't do touch and go's at my home airport (HNL), and
have to go to a nearby Class D airport to shoot landings. The
destination airport is definitely within 50 nm of HNL. Technically,
these flights count as x/c, even though I've never logged them as
such. Likewise, I've flown to airports only 47 nm away.

What do you guys/gals do? I guess it would depend on whether or not
you're persuing additional ratings.

Another question would be: what qualifies as a landing? A touch and
go is a landing, from experience. What about touching one wheel,
applying full power, and climbing away never to be seen again? Would
that count as a "landing"?

Alex



  #5  
Old November 25th 03, 03:06 AM
BTIZ
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I only log the sojourns to other airports as x-c if they are at least 50nm
from my starting point... I can hit 3 airports on the way to the distant
50nm airport.. and count it all.. if I turn back early,, or never land (T/G)
at the 50nm airport.. it don't count..

that way there are not any extraneous entries to "not add up" when computing
the requirement for additional ratings..

as far as the one wheel touch on a T/G.. I think it would count.. you did
alight one wheel to the ground..

by the same token, can you count a journey to a distant lake bed and landing
there as a cross country? It is not a designated "airport" or "landing area"
by any official governing entity.

yes you can
BT

"Koopas Ly" wrote in message
om...
Howdy,

I was reading a short article on AOPA regarding logging x/c time.

By definition, cross-country time includes any flight with a landing
at any airport other than the departure airport; there is no distance
requirement. Reference: FAR 61.1(b)(3)

Of course, the catch is that:

To meet the requirements (except rotorcraft) for a private
certificate, a commercial certificate, and the instrument rating
(except instrument-helicopter), cross-country time requires a landing
at least 50 nm from the point of departure. FAR 61.1(b)(3)(ii)


Since I will probably go for an instrument rating soon, and then
commercial, should I indeed refrain from logging ALL flights with a
landing at an airport other than the departure airport in the x/c
column, regardless of distance?

For instance, I can't do touch and go's at my home airport (HNL), and
have to go to a nearby Class D airport to shoot landings. The
destination airport is definitely within 50 nm of HNL. Technically,
these flights count as x/c, even though I've never logged them as
such. Likewise, I've flown to airports only 47 nm away.

What do you guys/gals do? I guess it would depend on whether or not
you're persuing additional ratings.

Another question would be: what qualifies as a landing? A touch and
go is a landing, from experience. What about touching one wheel,
applying full power, and climbing away never to be seen again? Would
that count as a "landing"?

Alex



  #6  
Old November 25th 03, 03:08 AM
BTIZ
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I did not notice the HNL remark before.. there are special considerations
for x-c in the islands.. check that out..

also.. a flight around the island may not count as x-c.. for us "main
landers" its the straight line shot to the distant airport that counts.. not
the zig-zag path we may take to get there.

BT

"Koopas Ly" wrote in message
om...
Howdy,

I was reading a short article on AOPA regarding logging x/c time.

By definition, cross-country time includes any flight with a landing
at any airport other than the departure airport; there is no distance
requirement. Reference: FAR 61.1(b)(3)

Of course, the catch is that:

To meet the requirements (except rotorcraft) for a private
certificate, a commercial certificate, and the instrument rating
(except instrument-helicopter), cross-country time requires a landing
at least 50 nm from the point of departure. FAR 61.1(b)(3)(ii)


Since I will probably go for an instrument rating soon, and then
commercial, should I indeed refrain from logging ALL flights with a
landing at an airport other than the departure airport in the x/c
column, regardless of distance?

For instance, I can't do touch and go's at my home airport (HNL), and
have to go to a nearby Class D airport to shoot landings. The
destination airport is definitely within 50 nm of HNL. Technically,
these flights count as x/c, even though I've never logged them as
such. Likewise, I've flown to airports only 47 nm away.

What do you guys/gals do? I guess it would depend on whether or not
you're persuing additional ratings.

Another question would be: what qualifies as a landing? A touch and
go is a landing, from experience. What about touching one wheel,
applying full power, and climbing away never to be seen again? Would
that count as a "landing"?

Alex



  #7  
Old November 25th 03, 04:21 AM
EDR
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Let's throw in another wrinkle...
Suppose you take off from the home drome, fly an hour in one direction,
look at something on the ground, turn around, fly back and land at the
home drome.
Your round trip flight has been 240 nm, but you did not land anywhere
else.
Is this a cross country flight?
  #8  
Old November 25th 03, 04:28 AM
G.R. Patterson III
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Default



Koopas Ly wrote:

What do you guys/gals do? I guess it would depend on whether or not
you're persuing additional ratings.


I log a flight as cross-country only if the destination is at least 50 miles
away.

George Patterson
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something that can be learned
no other way.
  #10  
Old November 25th 03, 06:42 AM
Peter Duniho
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"BTIZ" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
I did not notice the HNL remark before.. there are special considerations
for x-c in the islands.. check that out..


Those are only considerations for the primary ratings. For instrument and
commercial ratings, normal XC regulations apply.

Pete


 




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