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Flying in England for a US PPL



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 25th 04, 05:53 PM
John Harper
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Default Flying in England for a US PPL

I've written something about flying in England from the
perspective of a US pilot (albeit a Brit), it's at

www.john-a-harper.com/flying/england.htm

I'd especially be interested in any comments from UK
pilots.

John


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  #2  
Old May 25th 04, 06:11 PM
Dylan Smith
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In article [email protected], John Harper wrote:
I've written something about flying in England from the
perspective of a US pilot (albeit a Brit), it's at

www.john-a-harper.com/flying/england.htm


I also have one, at http://www.dylansmith.net - I'll check yours out and
compare :-)

--
Dylan Smith, Castletown, Isle of Man
Flying: http://www.dylansmith.net
Frontier Elite Universe: http://www.alioth.net
"Maintain thine airspeed, lest the ground come up and smite thee"
  #3  
Old May 25th 04, 06:39 PM
Dylan Smith
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In article [email protected], John Harper wrote:
I've written something about flying in England from the
perspective of a US pilot (albeit a Brit), it's at


Also, note the cost of flying depends strongly on where you live. I can
fly the Grumman at Andreas for 70 quid an hour less than the 172 you
flew (and fuel isn't any cheaper here). Also, if you're coming from the
USA, things are even more expensive right now due to the weakness of the
dollar against the pound. Some of the extra cost is that aircraft that
are rented must be on a 'Public Transport CofA' which is considerably
more expensive to keep up than a private CofA - the operating costs on a
private CofA appear to be significantly cheaper going by the hourly
rates many aircraft syndicates charge.

Also, the readback of altimeter settings - I'd say this is pretty much
mandatory in the US as well especially when flying IFR. It's pretty
important that the controller knows you're on the right setting. I've
always read back altimeter settings in the US (I lived there 7 years and
learned to fly VFR, IFR, multi, glider in Houston).

I'd also say that Radar Information Service is more the equivalent of
flight following; Flight Information Service might well be non-radar.
(Radar Advisory Service is something you might ask for when flying IMC
in class G airspace). There's a very good explanatory poster that the
CAA do (up in many flying clubs) that show the differences. Some
airfields also have reciprocal no-landing-fee agreements too (Barton had
one of these with at least 10 other airfields), and many airfields waive
all fees in the case of a diversion/emergency etc. (AOPA recently named
and shamed the ones that didn't)

--
Dylan Smith, Castletown, Isle of Man
Flying: http://www.dylansmith.net
Frontier Elite Universe: http://www.alioth.net
"Maintain thine airspeed, lest the ground come up and smite thee"
  #4  
Old May 25th 04, 06:42 PM
David Megginson
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Dylan Smith wrote:

Also, the readback of altimeter settings - I'd say this is pretty much
mandatory in the US as well especially when flying IFR.


Not VFR, though -- I don't think that you have to read back much except
hold-short instructions (while taxiing) in Canada or the U.S.


All the best,


David
  #5  
Old May 25th 04, 07:30 PM
Richard Herring
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In article , Peter
wrote

"John Harper" wrote

I've written something about flying in England from the
perspective of a US pilot (albeit a Brit), it's at

www.john-a-harper.com/flying/england.htm

I'd especially be interested in any comments from UK
pilots.

[...]
Stapleford does have some bigger planes there but also, according to
my maintenance engineer, has quite a history of landing gear collapses
on twins, as well as a lot of gradual damage.


The AAIB bulletins might be a more objective source of information on
that subject... http://www.aaib.dft.gov.uk. Searching on "Stapleford
undercarriage" gave 140-odd hits, but I gave up looking after the first
30 turned out to be irrelevant.

Don't forget that as an intensively-used training airfield, it has quite
a history of practically everything. Also a choice: if you don't like
grass there's always tarmac, and vice versa.

I would not take my TB20
there ever again.


What went wrong?

(aside to John H - the tarmac only gets used as taxiway when the active
is 04L. Most people prefer 900m of downhill grass to either half the
length of tarmac with a hedge at the end, or grass with a nasty bump if
you find you need the tarmac as well ;-)

As for the crosswind landing technique - certainly I was taught the
sideslip method, so it's not a transatlantic difference.
--
Richard Herring
  #6  
Old May 25th 04, 08:32 PM
John Harper
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Also, the readback of altimeter settings - I'd say this is pretty much
mandatory in the US as well especially when flying IFR. It's pretty


I've never read back a setting in the US, ever (VFR or IFR). They give them
when
you change freqs... "Roger 96S, Salinas altimeter 29.95" but I just
ack this with "96S". However I do always give altitude in a call
so they can cross check the mode C... "Oakland Center, Cessna
5296S level at 7500" or whatever.

John


  #7  
Old May 25th 04, 08:33 PM
John Harper
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Thanks for the comments.

What's N216AR?


Grob 115C. It's an OK acro trainer although I prefer
the Decathlon now that I'm flying it.

John




  #8  
Old May 25th 04, 11:21 PM
Brian Burger
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On Tue, 25 May 2004, David Megginson wrote:

Dylan Smith wrote:

Also, the readback of altimeter settings - I'd say this is pretty much
mandatory in the US as well especially when flying IFR.


Not VFR, though -- I don't think that you have to read back much except
hold-short instructions (while taxiing) in Canada or the U.S.


You need to read back landing clearances with holdshort instructions in
Canada; I ordinarily do, but a few months ago I just replied with my
callsign and Tower replied, "I need to hear your readback for the
tapes...".

I'd been doing TW circuits; the Tower guy & I both knew I could land the
Citabria in 3500ft, but 'the record' needed to know that I understood &
would comply. That was an interesting reminder.

Brian.
  #9  
Old May 25th 04, 11:25 PM
David Megginson
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Brian Burger wrote:

You need to read back landing clearances with holdshort instructions in
Canada; I ordinarily do, but a few months ago I just replied with my
callsign and Tower replied, "I need to hear your readback for the
tapes...".


Right -- that was the one I forgot.

Has any else noticed that LAHSO seems to be less common recently, in both
Canada and the U.S.?


All the best,


David
  #10  
Old May 25th 04, 11:26 PM
Richard Herring
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In article , Peter
wrote

Richard Herring wrote

The AAIB bulletins might be a more objective source of information on
that subject... http://www.aaib.dft.gov.uk. Searching on "Stapleford
undercarriage" gave 140-odd hits, but I gave up looking after the first
30 turned out to be irrelevant.


Point taken, but a lot of this stuff won't be reported.

I had no damage but it was the hardest ride I've ever had on takeoff.

Which runway?

--
Richard Herring
 




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