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Double Release Failure on Tow



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 28th 16, 01:38 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Piet Barber
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Default Double Release Failure on Tow

I'm sure a few people here have practiced it... but I really need to know:

Has it ever actually happened? I mean, has there ever been a bona fide certified, verified example of both release hooks failing in flight? The glider can't release, the glider gives the signal, the tow plane can't release, gives the signal; both aircraft land in formation.

Has anybody ever heard of this actually happening? If so, how did it turn out? What was the proficiency level of the pilots who did this? Did anything get scratched or bent?
Ads
  #2  
Old March 28th 16, 02:13 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Bill T
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Default Double Release Failure on Tow

Not heard of it happening for real. Maybe someone will know. Cindy?

Practice it, takes very precise flying by the tow pilot. Speed control and rate of descent control. Aim long or you're dragging the gliders through the weeds before the runway. Tow pilot does not brake unless he is running out of runway. Glider goes to low tow, keeps the rope tight with spoiler. Much easier in a draggy 2-33 than a Grob or K-21.

BillT
  #3  
Old March 28th 16, 02:31 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Bill T
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Default Double Release Failure on Tow

Burt may know of any.
  #4  
Old March 28th 16, 02:36 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
son_of_flubber
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Default Double Release Failure on Tow

On Sunday, March 27, 2016 at 8:38:16 PM UTC-4, Piet Barber wrote:
I'm sure a few people here have practiced it... but I really need to know:

Has it ever actually happened? I mean, has there ever been a bona fide certified, verified example of both release hooks failing in flight? The glider can't release, the glider gives the signal, the tow plane can't release, gives the signal; both aircraft land in formation.

Has anybody ever heard of this actually happening? If so, how did it turn out? What was the proficiency level of the pilots who did this? Did anything get scratched or bent?


Has anyone ever had an accident while landing on tow?

Is breaking the rope a better option?
  #5  
Old March 28th 16, 02:51 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
[email protected]
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Default Double Release Failure on Tow

Consider this.
I had this actually happen to me.
I was performing a private pilot check ride in and ASK 21. When it came time time to release, the release mechanism jammed and failed to release.
No radio was installed at the time.
We initiated the glider can not release signal. The tow pilot assumed this was a simulated situation since we were conducting a flight test.
After repeating the maneuver several times the tow pilot assumed we should land on tow instead of cutting the rope!
The PA 25 tow plane has a retractable tow rope.
We made a successful landing and I wheeled the ASK 21 to the shop and installed a radio! And fixed the tow release.
Rex
  #6  
Old March 28th 16, 03:09 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Bill T
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Default Double Release Failure on Tow

Thanks Rex! I guess the tow pilot failing to cut the rope is a "tow pilot release failure".
No radio in a glider, I carry a handheld.

BillT
  #7  
Old March 28th 16, 03:46 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
George Haeh
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Posts: 167
Default Double Release Failure on Tow

A vigorous "Can Not
Release" signal has a
good probability of
breaking the weak link.

If you remember not to
release after breaking
the weak link, you can
use the Tost rings again.

  #8  
Old March 28th 16, 04:06 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
JS
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Posts: 1,384
Default Double Release Failure on Tow

On Sunday, March 27, 2016 at 8:00:08 PM UTC-7, George Haeh wrote:
A vigorous "Can Not
Release" signal has a
good probability of
breaking the weak link.

If you remember not to
release after breaking
the weak link, you can
use the Tost rings again.


But landing on tow is fun.
Jim
  #9  
Old March 28th 16, 05:21 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
[email protected][_1_]
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Default Double Release Failure on Tow

Not this again! Yer gonna die!

Seriously, after signals are exhanged, and within a very conservative glide of the field (like overhead) open the brakes, fly normal high tow position and wheel land. Use brakes sparingly to only keep the rope taught and not run over it. The odds of a tug being able to stop more rapidly than a glider are small, short of the tug ground looping or other wreckery.

L.O.T. used to be a pre-solo confidence building maneuver employed liberally at Skylark North, CA. An instructor demo touch-and-go followed by a student touch-and-go and then a full stop by the student. Very rare that the student needed anything other than some verbal coaching.

Oh, and what JS said, much fun, and the student confidence index soared!

Double release failure = statistical nonevent. Kind of like glider-glider midairs in the USA. Maybe we need auto-LOT technology coupled to our FLARM's in case we have a potential traffic conflict while LOT-ing?


But yer gonna die..... but probably not doing LOT's or in a glider-glider midair.

  #10  
Old March 28th 16, 12:37 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Jonathan St. Cloud
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Posts: 1,463
Default Double Release Failure on Tow

When I did double release failure practice, we used the low tow position, fear on the high two was we would over run/fly the tow plane.

On Sunday, March 27, 2016 at 9:21:15 PM UTC-7, wrote:
Not this again! Yer gonna die!

Seriously, after signals are exhanged, and within a very conservative glide of the field (like overhead) open the brakes, fly normal high tow position and wheel land. Use brakes sparingly to only keep the rope taught and not run over it. The odds of a tug being able to stop more rapidly than a glider are small, short of the tug ground looping or other wreckery.


 




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