A aviation & planes forum. AviationBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » AviationBanter forum » rec.aviation newsgroups » Soaring
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Air to air photography



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old October 2nd 06, 11:12 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Stephen Cook
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Air to air photography

At my club we want to take some air to air photographs of a glider for
promotional purposes. Does anyone have any useful experience they can pass
on?

Questions I'm thinking of:
What is a suitable camera aircraft? I imagine another glider is not the
easiest for getting the camera where you want it but does have the benefit
of low vibration. However I will be using an image stabilised lens. High
wing or low wing? What formation to fly? What is the best/easiest
combination of distance between the aircraft and lens focal length? What
pattern to fly? Obviously having the sun in the right place is important
but we can't fly in a straight line forever. I imagine if you're using a
tug (which has just launched the subject glider) you wouldn't want the rope
on the back.

I know that careful planning and briefing is important.

Stephen

--



Ads
  #2  
Old October 3rd 06, 04:44 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
BT
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 995
Default Air to air photography

pilots who are experienced in formation flight
pilot flying is not operating the camera

"Stephen Cook" ] wrote in message
...
At my club we want to take some air to air photographs of a glider for
promotional purposes. Does anyone have any useful experience they can
pass on?

Questions I'm thinking of:
What is a suitable camera aircraft? I imagine another glider is not the
easiest for getting the camera where you want it but does have the benefit
of low vibration. However I will be using an image stabilised lens. High
wing or low wing? What formation to fly? What is the best/easiest
combination of distance between the aircraft and lens focal length? What
pattern to fly? Obviously having the sun in the right place is important
but we can't fly in a straight line forever. I imagine if you're using a
tug (which has just launched the subject glider) you wouldn't want the
rope on the back.

I know that careful planning and briefing is important.

Stephen

--





  #3  
Old October 3rd 06, 06:55 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
raulb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 79
Default Air to air photography

I have done air-to-air shots from a variety of aircraft, both as pilot
and as photographer: A T-34 Texan, a Stearman biplane, a DG-500, a
TG-2, and a couple of others that I canot think of at the moment. I
have done it with canopies on, canopies off, and open cockpit. All had
their plusses and minuses but the best shots were taken when I flew the
DG-500 and another fellow took pictures. We took photos of several
gliders in DG, even flying in formation for a long time with a Ka-8.

I think maybe any 2-place glider with pilots who are comfortable flying
in close formation would work (the DG and K-8 were VERY close). We
flew mostly in still air. The K-8 pilot mostly flew looking straight
ahead (and looked for other aircraft) while I kept the distances
between us and watched for other aircraft. I had to keep my speed down
and he had to keep his up.

The most difficult that I worked with was the Texan (I took pictures
and someone else flew) which, although it could slow down some, could
not slow down enough and had to make really large turns. However, I
still managed to get a great cover shot of a TG-2 over the Tehachapi
(CA) windmills.

Basically I think that any airplane--even 2-place glider--capable of
flying slow enough would work. A Cub or Super Cub should be ideal
although I have never worked with any. The Polish Wilga was
specificlly built to serve as a camera platform and can fly VERY
slowly.

Banking the camera platform may be necessary for good photos if you do
not want your wing in the shot, but you will have to be quick on the
shutter release and be ready to follow the subject. This will be true
with both high and low wing aircraft. Banking the subject glider makes
a great shot.

The very most important part will be the pilots. If one or both pilot
is uncomfortable flying slow or especially flying slow in close
proximity of another aircraft, you have a bad camera platform and a
potentially dangerous situation. BOTH pilots have to be
comfortable!!!! Plus, rough air of any sort is definately to be
avoided in my opinion. Still air is best but light thermals should be
OK.

COMMUNICATION BETWEEN PILOTS IS VERY IMPORTANT. Even if only the
camera plane pilot talks, use your radio!!!!! I cannot emphasize this
enough.

Pre-planning and pre-flight briefings with both pilots and the
photographer are very important as well. Everyone should know what is
expected of them and what the other people are going to be doing. But
be flexible because conditions will change.

Also, although I never used a stabilized lense I got great shots
anyway.

Stephen Cook wrote:
At my club we want to take some air to air photographs of a glider for
promotional purposes. Does anyone have any useful experience they can pass
on?

Questions I'm thinking of:
What is a suitable camera aircraft? I imagine another glider is not the
easiest for getting the camera where you want it but does have the benefit
of low vibration. However I will be using an image stabilised lens. High
wing or low wing? What formation to fly? What is the best/easiest
combination of distance between the aircraft and lens focal length? What
pattern to fly? Obviously having the sun in the right place is important
but we can't fly in a straight line forever. I imagine if you're using a
tug (which has just launched the subject glider) you wouldn't want the rope
on the back.

I know that careful planning and briefing is important.

Stephen

--


  #4  
Old October 3rd 06, 11:07 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
2cernauta2
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10
Default Air to air photography

I wish to add only a few points to the excellent post by raulb

What formation to fly?


I like to let both aircraft fly intersecating "snake" patterns (a
sequence of gentle L and R turns, in converging directions). There's
no danger: the pilot of the subject aircraft can easily fly towards
the tail of the camera-glider, passing just behind and keeping a very
wide control of the situation.
Staying very very close is no longer necessary with this pattern.
Gently banked gliders look much better, IMHO.

What is the best/easiest combination of distance between the aircraft and lens focal length?


Focal length of 135mm, or 80-200mm zoom, on the usual 35mm format. (or
equivalent). This is what I found to best suit my needs

Aldo
  #5  
Old October 5th 06, 03:53 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Paul[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 15
Default Air to air photography


Stephen Cook wrote:
At my club we want to take some air to air photographs of a glider for
promotional purposes. Does anyone have any useful experience they can pass
on?

[snip]
Stephen


For what it's worth, a couple of the better air-to-air photos on my
wall were taken from the back seat of a 2-33 with the window open. No
canopy distortion, high wing easy to bank out of the way, slow flight
not a problem.

Another good platform is the J-3 Cub with the door open, for the same
reasons. In both cases, the pilot flying was NOT the photographer.

Paul

  #6  
Old October 5th 06, 04:31 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Surfer!
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 81
Default Air to air photography

In message .com, Paul
writes

Stephen Cook wrote:
At my club we want to take some air to air photographs of a glider for
promotional purposes. Does anyone have any useful experience they can pass
on?

[snip]
Stephen


For what it's worth, a couple of the better air-to-air photos on my
wall were taken from the back seat of a 2-33 with the window open. No
canopy distortion, high wing easy to bank out of the way, slow flight
not a problem.

Another good platform is the J-3 Cub with the door open, for the same
reasons. In both cases, the pilot flying was NOT the photographer.


Slingsby T21 - open cockpit, 2 seats side-by-side, flies at just over 30
knots - don't bother if it's a windy day!


--
Surfer!
Email to: ramwater at uk2 dot net
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
aerial photography at night jason Piloting 25 October 20th 05 09:24 AM
Camera Mounts & Gliding Photography Charles Petersen Soaring 0 June 18th 05 10:35 AM
Aerial PHotography Flights 'Required' to File Flight Plans C J Campbell Piloting 15 December 6th 04 02:17 PM
New Aviation Photography Website Roger Kemp Military Aviation 0 January 24th 04 01:23 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 07:35 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2020 AviationBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.