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Written Test



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 23rd 05, 05:12 AM
W P Dixon
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Posts: n/a
Default Written Test


Guys and Gals,
Getting all studied up to take my written, scoring 85's easily. Seems
most I miss are the chart questions. Mostly because the charts in this study
book are very small and cluttered I think. So what do you think, am I ready?
I feel pretty comfortable about it and think I will do better on the actual
test when the chart is right there in front of me, instead of fumbling
through a book with the small pics of them. Posting this here instead of
..student..because yall have already taken the test, the student may not
have. I also value the combined experience versus a students opinion.

--
Patrick Dixon
student SPL
aircraft structural mech

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  #2  
Old August 23rd 05, 05:19 AM
Jack Allison
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Default

FWIW, when preparing for my PPL written, my CFI would only endorse me
for the test if I scored 85 or above on a practice test. It seemed to
work. For the instrument written, I did the same thing and it worked as
well. IMHO, if you're consistently scoring 85, you should do just
fine on the real test.


--
Jack Allison
PP-ASEL-IA Student
Arrow N2104T

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the Earth
with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there
you will always long to return"
- Leonardo Da Vinci

(Remove the obvious from address to reply via e-mail)
  #3  
Old August 23rd 05, 05:37 AM
external usenet poster
 
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Default


Getting all studied up to take my written, scoring 85's easily.


So what do you think, am I ready?

Not bad...you're ready or close to it.

Seems
most I miss are the chart questions. Mostly because the charts in this study
book are very small and cluttered I think.
I feel pretty comfortable about it and think I will do better on the actual
test when the chart is right there in front of me, instead of fumbling
through a book with the small pics of them.


Buy a copy of the real book that accompanies the test...then you have
the real thing....remember the 'scale' on those is close BUT NOT
exactly the scale on your plotter...but the scale IS given on each
chart.

"Computer Testing Supplement for Recreational Pilot and Private Pilot"

FAA-CT-8080-2D

I'm surprised more people dont do that...or maybe they don't know they
can get that book. It was included in my "initial issue" of
"books you gotta have".


Posting this here instead of
.student..because yall have already taken the test, the student may not
have. I also value the combined experience versus a students opinion.

A lot of CFI's and recent pilot types (like me) hang out in the
student group. The student group is not just for primary students.

--Don B
Don Byrer
Electronics Technician/Friendly but Sarcastic Pilot
FAA Airways Facilites/Tech Ops, RADAR/Data/Comm @ CLE
Amateur Radio KJ5KB
Instrument Pilot Commercial Student
PP-ASEL 30 Jan 2005 "-IA" 25 Mar 2005

  #4  
Old August 23rd 05, 05:45 AM
W P Dixon
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I have taken the test 2 more times since posting my question and I have 2
90's ! I just hope I am not going to get to confident and put my guard down.
I am one of those that just dreads test,..always have....

Patrick
student SPL
aircraft structural mech

wrote in message
news

Getting all studied up to take my written, scoring 85's easily.


So what do you think, am I ready?

Not bad...you're ready or close to it.

Seems
most I miss are the chart questions. Mostly because the charts in this
study
book are very small and cluttered I think.
I feel pretty comfortable about it and think I will do better on the
actual
test when the chart is right there in front of me, instead of fumbling
through a book with the small pics of them.


Buy a copy of the real book that accompanies the test...then you have
the real thing....remember the 'scale' on those is close BUT NOT
exactly the scale on your plotter...but the scale IS given on each
chart.

"Computer Testing Supplement for Recreational Pilot and Private Pilot"

FAA-CT-8080-2D

I'm surprised more people dont do that...or maybe they don't know they
can get that book. It was included in my "initial issue" of
"books you gotta have".


Posting this here instead of
.student..because yall have already taken the test, the student may not
have. I also value the combined experience versus a students opinion.

A lot of CFI's and recent pilot types (like me) hang out in the
student group. The student group is not just for primary students.

--Don B
Don Byrer
Electronics Technician/Friendly but Sarcastic Pilot
FAA Airways Facilites/Tech Ops, RADAR/Data/Comm @ CLE
Amateur Radio KJ5KB
Instrument Pilot Commercial Student
PP-ASEL 30 Jan 2005 "-IA" 25 Mar 2005


  #5  
Old August 23rd 05, 01:34 PM
Mortimer Schnerd, RN
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Posts: n/a
Default

W P Dixon wrote:
I have taken the test 2 more times since posting my question and I have 2
90's ! I just hope I am not going to get to confident and put my guard down.
I am one of those that just dreads test,..always have....



You'll do fine. It seems to me I scored an 86 on private, 89 on instrument , 88
on commercial and 92 on ATP-135. I only attended ground schools for the
instrument and commercial (I lack discipline when it comes to studying).
Really, anything more than 70 is gravy but the better you score, the less
painful the oral will be when it comes time for that. Somebody who just barely
scrapes by is going to get a real grilling compared to those who are on top of
things.

In any case, you've got solid scores and you'll be just fine. Good luck!



--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN

VE


  #6  
Old August 23rd 05, 03:58 PM
RomeoMike
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Default

I wonder how many people would even pass the written tests, especially
the instrument, if the answers weren't readily available from the
various teaching sources, assuming that's still the case. Makes me smile
a little when people brag about high scores.

Mortimer Schnerd, RN wrote:



You'll do fine. It seems to me I scored an 86 on private, 89 on instrument , 88
on commercial and 92 on ATP-135. I only attended ground schools for the
instrument and commercial (I lack discipline when it comes to studying).


  #7  
Old August 23rd 05, 05:27 PM
Michael
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Default

Let me offer you an instructor's perspective:

Just based on what you told me, if you came up to me and asked for an
endorsement I would give you one. If you think you're ready - you're
ready. I've given written test endorsements (for private, instrument,
commercial, and instructor) to everyone who has ever asked. Never had
one fail.

In fact, I've never seen a person who actually prepared and studied and
took practice tests, and then wondered if he was ready, ever fail. Not
once. So go take it already.

Michael

  #8  
Old August 23rd 05, 05:46 PM
Michael
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Default

I wonder how many people would even pass the written tests, especially
the instrument, if the answers weren't readily available


The lucky ones.

The FAA written tests are hideously bad. I've become something of a
reluctant expert on them because I've taken over a dozen different
ones. On the one hand, the way they are administered they are
ridiculously easy. I'm convinced that if you give me a Gleim book and
two weeks to study, I can pass an FAA exam on Chinese Brain Surgery. I
passed an FAA powerplant exam that was primarily focused on turbine
engines, and I've never even touched a turbine engine. However, I can
still tell you that the basic combustion chamber designs are the can,
the annular, and the can-annular.

The flip side to this is that the test questions are often so obscure
or convoluted, they might as well be about Chinese Brain Surgery. The
FAA publishes the Aviation Instructor's Handbook (used to be the Flight
Instructor's Handbook, but it got changed). It's not a bad book. It
actually does a reasonably decent job of introducing someone who has no
teaching experience to the basic concepts of learning (even if the
psychology involved is a bit dated), motivation, lesson planning, test
taking and developing tests, etc. There are even examples of good and
bad test questions. By the time I read the book I had well over a
decade of teaching experience in subjects as diverse and thermodynamics
and skydiving, and I still found it a somewhat worthwhile read. In
order to hold any FAA instructional rating, one must pass a test on
what is purportedly the material in the book. The test is the FOI
(Fundamentals of Instructing) and most of the questions on it could
legitimately be used as examples of bad test questions.

Much the same is true of the other FAA exams to some extent. The
instrument is pretty bad - a lot of the stuff there is utterly useless
to the pilot, confusing, or both.

How many statellites are required for effective 3-D navigation without
barometric aiding, the test DOESN'T ask. That would be a sensible sort
of question, since most GPS units allow the pilot to monitor the
satellite reception status and thus know how close to the limit he is.
Further, anyone with an understanding of how GPS works can immediately
answer that question. But instead, the test asks how many satellites
are in the GPS constellation. I can go on with bad questions like
these all day long.

This is why I tell my students that the best thing to do is get the
written out of the way before you start flying, and put in only the
minimum effort required to pass. When you study for an FAA written,
you don't learn important things about flying. You learn how to pass
an FAA written. Any overlap between the two is strictly coincidental.
And honestly, even though I file and fly IFR routinely, and teach it,
and could easily pass an IFR (or CFII) checkride tomorrow on no notice,
I doubt I could pass the IFR written - and I KNOW I couldn't pass the
FOI written.

Michael

  #9  
Old August 23rd 05, 11:49 PM
Steven Barnes
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Posts: n/a
Default

I was getting mid to upper 80's on my Private practice tests. Got a 97 or so
on the real thing. Amazing how you slow down & pay attention to the
questions when it's the real thing. :-)


"W P Dixon" wrote in message
...

Guys and Gals,
Getting all studied up to take my written, scoring 85's easily. Seems
most I miss are the chart questions. Mostly because the charts in this

study
book are very small and cluttered I think. So what do you think, am I

ready?
I feel pretty comfortable about it and think I will do better on the

actual
test when the chart is right there in front of me, instead of fumbling
through a book with the small pics of them. Posting this here instead of
.student..because yall have already taken the test, the student may not
have. I also value the combined experience versus a students opinion.

--
Patrick Dixon
student SPL
aircraft structural mech



  #10  
Old August 24th 05, 12:44 AM
W P Dixon
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Hee Hee,
I can believe that! I do the practice test in about 20 mins average.

Patrick
student SPL
aircraft structural mech

"Steven Barnes" wrote in message
.. .
I was getting mid to upper 80's on my Private practice tests. Got a 97 or
so
on the real thing. Amazing how you slow down & pay attention to the
questions when it's the real thing. :-)


"W P Dixon" wrote in message
...

Guys and Gals,
Getting all studied up to take my written, scoring 85's easily. Seems
most I miss are the chart questions. Mostly because the charts in this

study
book are very small and cluttered I think. So what do you think, am I

ready?
I feel pretty comfortable about it and think I will do better on the

actual
test when the chart is right there in front of me, instead of fumbling
through a book with the small pics of them. Posting this here instead of
.student..because yall have already taken the test, the student may not
have. I also value the combined experience versus a students opinion.

--
Patrick Dixon
student SPL
aircraft structural mech




 




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