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Is there a "correct" panel layout?



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 22nd 06, 07:38 PM posted to rec.aviation.owning
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Default Is there a "correct" panel layout?

I'm wondering... if you were laying out your panel today... is there a
specific way, perhaps a "standard" way, that you'd layout your
instruments? I've seen some un-intuitive layouts and I'm wondering if
anyone and provide me with some insight as to safest/user friendly
layout.

Thanks,

-dr

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  #2  
Old May 22nd 06, 07:44 PM posted to rec.aviation.owning
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Default Is there a "correct" panel layout?

In a previous article, "Dico" said:
I'm wondering... if you were laying out your panel today... is there a
specific way, perhaps a "standard" way, that you'd layout your
instruments? I've seen some un-intuitive layouts and I'm wondering if
anyone and provide me with some insight as to safest/user friendly
layout.


Actually, I was just talking with some people at Pinckneyville about this,
and wondering how much it would hurt the resale value of a plane if you
were to turn everything around so you would fly it from the right seat.
I'm left handed, and I hate that I have to switch hands on the yoke to
write down a new frequency or clearance, then switch back to turn the
radios or set the OBS.


--
Paul Tomblin http://xcski.com/blogs/pt/
In any business, the customer is always right, except when he calls
technical support.
  #3  
Old May 22nd 06, 10:12 PM posted to rec.aviation.owning
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Default Is there a "correct" panel layout?

The most common set up is to have the six pack on the left, communicate
and navigate in the middle, and engine information on the right.

When looking for a Cessna 150, I did decline to pursue one particular
airplane because the panel instruments seemed to be sprinkled around in
no particular logical order.

Most panels do not have the tachometer as prominently placed for
viewing by the pilot as the six-pack instruments, but I would much
prefer the tachometer on my side (left). I check it far more often than
the vertical speed indicator.

  #4  
Old May 22nd 06, 11:22 PM posted to rec.aviation.owning
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Default Is there a "correct" panel layout?

Also... what is the best way to layout a six pack? are there
"standards" with that? Where does/should each instrument go?

-dr

  #5  
Old May 23rd 06, 02:23 AM posted to rec.aviation.owning
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Default Is there a "correct" panel layout?

Insurance companies like "accepted standards" for pilots that routinely may
fly different aircraft, to include gear/flap lever positions and the order
of the Throttle(MP)/Prop(RPM)/Mixture(FuelFlow) levers.

Airspeed, Attitude, Altimeter
Turn and Bank, Compass/HSI, VSI

Secondary Nav instruments (primary on the HSI) to the right of the Altimeter
and VSI
Radio stack to the right of that, Engine instruments where they fit

If you look at most business class turbines you'll find the engine stack
between the Nav indicators and the radio stack.

BT

"Dico" wrote in message
oups.com...
Also... what is the best way to layout a six pack? are there
"standards" with that? Where does/should each instrument go?

-dr



  #7  
Old May 23rd 06, 03:58 AM posted to rec.aviation.owning
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Default Is there a "correct" panel layout?

Why do I look at the tachometer?

I check the rpm at run-up to see if the mag causes excessive rpm drop;
to see if carb heat is working; during take-off run to make sure the
engine is producing full power. I have a set rpm that I use for cruise
climb and another rpm setting when going in a long descent; once in the
pattern I set the rpm so that I'll bleed off the altitude as I go
around the pattern. I do look at the tach more often than the vertical
speed indicator.

Tach time would also be useful for computing endurance, (much more
reliable than the gas gauges), but where it is placed makes the numbers
difficult to read.

For impending problems, the tachometer is rather worthless, so I do
scan oil temperature, oil pressure, CHT.

  #8  
Old May 24th 06, 03:40 AM posted to rec.aviation.owning
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Default Is there a "correct" panel layout?

On 22 May 2006 19:58:13 -0700, wrote:

Why do I look at the tachometer?

I check the rpm at run-up to see if the mag causes excessive rpm drop;
to see if carb heat is working; during take-off run to make sure the
engine is producing full power.


Yep, no problem here, I do the same, common sense if one follows the POH on
the before take off list as the tach is an integral part of analyzing
engine performance.

I have a set rpm that I use for cruise
climb and another rpm setting when going in a long descent; once in the
pattern I set the rpm so that I'll bleed off the altitude as I go
around the pattern. I do look at the tach more often than the vertical
speed indicator.


Why not use the throttle lock? Once you set it, you forget it.

Personally, only time I really care about my RPM's is on my descent on an
ILS approach, where I set it to 1900, and slide down the glide slope.

Some adjustments on the RPM may be warranted based on need for more power
on headwind considerations, but once I establish the approach and have it
stabilized, the 500 fpm on the VSI is is the glide slope, my descent is not
based on RPMs as that may change based on wind considerations.

Tach time would also be useful for computing endurance, (much more
reliable than the gas gauges), but where it is placed makes the numbers
difficult to read.


Once you determine a burn rate based on RPM, I do agree, but for my basic
everyday enroute cruise, unless I notice a change in performance that
requires more power to hold level flight, I don't even think about looking
at the RPMs.

For impending problems, the tachometer is rather worthless, so I do
scan oil temperature, oil pressure, CHT.


and other then on ground analysis, or possible inflight mag check, or carb
icing considerations or fuel burn rate as you brought up, for basic flying
needs, the tach really doesn't need to be a part of your instrument scan.

Allen
  #9  
Old May 25th 06, 01:47 AM posted to rec.aviation.owning
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Default Is there a "correct" panel layout?

Personally, only time I really care about my RPM's is on my descent on an
ILS approach, where I set it to 1900, and slide down the glide slope.


Do you keep jockeying the yoke back and forth to stay on glide slope?

The Navy taught us to trim for the desired speed, then make throttle
adjustments to stay on the glide slope. Much easier and better, IMHO.

vince norris
 




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