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Rescue Aid



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 17th 18, 07:31 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Graham Drinkell[_2_]
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Posts: 3
Default Rescue Aid

I am working on a fluorescent pouch, comprising a helio-graph, hi
intensity LED lamp with SOS function, thermal blankets and an
EPIRB/mob phone pocket. Smoke flares cannot be used. This is a low
profit safety product. I will produce some decent photos and costs in
due course.


Ads
  #2  
Old July 17th 18, 08:22 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
[email protected]
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Posts: 204
Default Rescue Aid

My land-out kit has had a little pit of everything in it, over the years..............even a fishing kit..........in Nevada .........really? Finally decided there are really only two essential items..............communication & water! Make a call before landing and monitor sailplane radio after landing. Cell phone can be used to report position and condition, most of the time. AND have enough water to last you 24 hours!
JJ
  #3  
Old July 18th 18, 02:22 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
2G
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Posts: 453
Default Rescue Aid

On Tuesday, July 17, 2018 at 12:22:15 PM UTC-7, wrote:
My land-out kit has had a little pit of everything in it, over the years..............even a fishing kit..........in Nevada .........really? Finally decided there are really only two essential items..............communication & water! Make a call before landing and monitor sailplane radio after landing. Cell phone can be used to report position and condition, most of the time. AND have enough water to last you 24 hours!
JJ


Water is the ONE thing you CAN'T do without. It's a nuisance to strap to your parachute, but sit out in 90+ degree temperatures and see how long you can go without taking a drink.
PS. Bring your own shade in the form of an emergency blanket - they are very compact.

Tom
  #4  
Old July 18th 18, 06:44 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Duster[_2_]
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Posts: 80
Default Rescue Aid

Bernard is a company that is producing dehydrated water in packets of varying sizes, the most popular being the 1 gal capacity.

http://www.bernardfoods.com/foodserv...datedwater.htm

They are also working on a piezoelectric-based water condenser that apparently extracts moisture from the atmosphere. It is available as an app (sorry no Android version available), consumes very little battery and the water exits the iPhone X via its mini-audio jack. Make sure your emergency kit also includes a quarter for the pay phone you'll need to call your crew.
  #5  
Old July 18th 18, 09:26 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Eric Greenwell[_4_]
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Posts: 1,060
Default Rescue Aid

2G wrote on 7/17/2018 6:22 PM:
Water is the ONE thing you CAN'T do without. It's a nuisance to strap to your parachute, but sit out in 90+ degree temperatures and see how long you can go without taking a drink.
PS. Bring your own shade in the form of an emergency blanket - they are very compact.

How much water, and how do you strap it to your parachute?

--
Eric Greenwell - Washington State, USA (change ".netto" to ".us" to email me)
- "A Guide to Self-Launching Sailplane Operation"
https://sites.google.com/site/motorg...ad-the-guide-1
- "Transponders in Sailplanes - Dec 2014a" also ADS-B, PCAS, Flarm

http://soaringsafety.org/prevention/...anes-2014A.pdf
  #6  
Old July 19th 18, 02:03 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Dan Marotta
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Posts: 3,185
Default Rescue Aid

You don't have to strap it to your parachute.* Simply empty the can into
your pants pocket and go fly.* If you don't land out, transfer the
contents of your pocket back to the can.

On 7/18/2018 2:26 PM, Eric Greenwell wrote:
2G wrote on 7/17/2018 6:22 PM:
Water is the ONE thing you CAN'T do without. It's a nuisance to strap
to your parachute, but sit out in 90+ degree temperatures and see how
long you can go without taking a drink.
PS. Bring your own shade in the form of an emergency blanket - they
are very compact.

How much water, and how do you strap it to your parachute?


--
Dan, 5J
  #7  
Old July 19th 18, 03:54 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
2G
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Posts: 453
Default Rescue Aid

On Wednesday, July 18, 2018 at 1:26:30 PM UTC-7, Eric Greenwell wrote:
2G wrote on 7/17/2018 6:22 PM:
Water is the ONE thing you CAN'T do without. It's a nuisance to strap to your parachute, but sit out in 90+ degree temperatures and see how long you can go without taking a drink.
PS. Bring your own shade in the form of an emergency blanket - they are very compact.

How much water, and how do you strap it to your parachute?

--
Eric Greenwell - Washington State, USA (change ".netto" to ".us" to email me)
- "A Guide to Self-Launching Sailplane Operation"
https://sites.google.com/site/motorg...ad-the-guide-1
- "Transponders in Sailplanes - Dec 2014a" also ADS-B, PCAS, Flarm

http://soaringsafety.org/prevention/...anes-2014A.pdf


Put a water bottle in your fanny pack. Or you could spread out your parachute canopy and pray for rain.

Tom
  #8  
Old July 19th 18, 04:12 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Jonathan St. Cloud
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Posts: 965
Default Rescue Aid

On Wednesday, July 18, 2018 at 6:03:16 PM UTC-7, Dan Marotta wrote:
You don't have to strap it to your parachute.* Simply empty the can into
your pants pocket and go fly.* If you don't land out, transfer the
contents of your pocket back to the can.

On 7/18/2018 2:26 PM, Eric Greenwell wrote:
2G wrote on 7/17/2018 6:22 PM:
Water is the ONE thing you CAN'T do without. It's a nuisance to strap
to your parachute, but sit out in 90+ degree temperatures and see how
long you can go without taking a drink.
PS. Bring your own shade in the form of an emergency blanket - they
are very compact.

How much water, and how do you strap it to your parachute?


--
Dan, 5J


I fly with a "smak pack" with the water pouches, headlamp, wire saw (also have one in bracelet) water purification tablets, Qwick Clot bandages, fire starter material and a few gel energy packs for biking)

http://www.bestglide.com/mainstay_emergency_water.html

https://www.wazoosurvivalgear.com/bracelets/

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1


  #9  
Old July 19th 18, 04:57 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Duster[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 80
Default Rescue Aid


Put a water bottle in your fanny pack. Or you could spread out your parachute canopy and pray for rain


Both good ideas, in principle, but fanny packs were outlawed in the late '80s before water bottles were invented....and FAR Part 91.307 does not permit one to use a parachute for emergency purposes (this would include its use as a vessel to collect rainwater) unless it had been repacked within the previous 180 days. You just deployed it, so you're screwed ala Catch-22. A much better idea is to always carry ballast water in your tail tank. Dual purpose solution; the ship will have both a safe CG and since you cannot consume the tank water during flight, you'll always have some in reserve just in case of a land/crash out. Make sure you don't drain too much out, since the NTSB guy will cite you for improper W&B.
  #10  
Old July 19th 18, 05:14 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Eric Greenwell[_4_]
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Posts: 1,060
Default Rescue Aid

Two problems: 1) I keep my phone in my pocket, so it'd get wet; 2) can't get water
in a can in this area, only plastic bottles (even Amazon won't ship cans here).
But it got me thinking: I could strap a quart plastic bottle just above each
ankle, and hardly notice it. Velcro strap, zip ties, duct tape - need figure out
the best method. Or maybe really baggy "cargo pants", and put the bottles in the
leg pockets.

Dan Marotta wrote on 7/18/2018 6:03 PM:
You don't have to strap it to your parachute. Simply empty the can into your
pants pocket and go fly. If you don't land out, transfer the contents of your
pocket back to the can.

On 7/18/2018 2:26 PM, Eric Greenwell wrote:
2G wrote on 7/17/2018 6:22 PM:
Water is the ONE thing you CAN'T do without. It's a nuisance to strap to your
parachute, but sit out in 90+ degree temperatures and see how long you can go
without taking a drink.
PS. Bring your own shade in the form of an emergency blanket - they are very
compact.

How much water, and how do you strap it to your parachute?


--
Eric Greenwell - Washington State, USA (change ".netto" to ".us" to email me)
- "A Guide to Self-Launching Sailplane Operation"
https://sites.google.com/site/motorg...ad-the-guide-1
- "Transponders in Sailplanes - Dec 2014a" also ADS-B, PCAS, Flarm

http://soaringsafety.org/prevention/...anes-2014A.pdf
 




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