A aviation & planes forum. AviationBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » AviationBanter forum » rec.aviation newsgroups » Piloting
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

How do weather services get sky conditions above the surface?



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old July 23rd 08, 02:37 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Mxsmanic
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,169
Default How do weather services get sky conditions above the surface?

It's easy enough to establish measurement stations on the surface to measure
wind, temperature, visibility, etc., but what is the normal way for
meteorologists to measure these things aloft? Do they depend on PIREPs, or
expendable/recoverable probes and balloons, or satellites, or what?
Ads
  #2  
Old July 23rd 08, 03:01 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 181
Default How do weather services get sky conditions above the surface?

On Jul 23, 9:37*am, Mxsmanic wrote:
It's easy enough to establish measurement stations on the surface to measure
wind, temperature, visibility, etc., but what is the normal way for
meteorologists to measure these things aloft? *Do they depend on PIREPs, or
expendable/recoverable probes and balloons, or satellites, or what?


This is one of your poorest troll attempts, Anthony, you are a
disappointment. Please try to do better.
  #4  
Old July 23rd 08, 03:06 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Bertie the Bunyip[_24_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,969
Default How do weather services get sky conditions above the surface?

Mxsmanic wrote in
:

It's easy enough to establish measurement stations on the surface to
measure wind, temperature, visibility, etc., but what is the normal
way for meteorologists to measure these things aloft? Do they depend
on PIREPs, or expendable/recoverable probes and balloons, or
satellites, or what?


They lok out the window fjukktard.
Try it.

Bertie
  #5  
Old July 23rd 08, 03:09 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Darkwing
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 604
Default How do weather services get sky conditions above the surface?


"Mxsmanic" wrote in message
...
It's easy enough to establish measurement stations on the surface to
measure
wind, temperature, visibility, etc., but what is the normal way for
meteorologists to measure these things aloft? Do they depend on PIREPs,
or
expendable/recoverable probes and balloons, or satellites, or what?


Try Google, Simboi.



  #7  
Old July 23rd 08, 03:24 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
buttman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 361
Default How do weather services get sky conditions above the surface?

On Jul 23, 7:37*am, Mxsmanic wrote:
It's easy enough to establish measurement stations on the surface to measure
wind, temperature, visibility, etc., but what is the normal way for
meteorologists to measure these things aloft? *Do they depend on PIREPs, or
expendable/recoverable probes and balloons, or satellites, or what?


Theres a little "eye" that looks up at the sky at various points. It
detects if there is cloud, or sky. The sensor is prone to errors,
though. Sometimes if it's broken, it'll say its overcast because some
of the sensors are pointing diagonally and are sensing the side of the
cloud. I had an ATC college-style text book that had a very
informative diagram of how they worked, but that book is long gone.

http://www.cyanogen.com/products/cloud_main.htm

here is an example of one.
  #8  
Old July 23rd 08, 03:46 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Frank Olson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 90
Default How do weather services get sky conditions above the surface?

Mxsmanic wrote:
It's easy enough to establish measurement stations on the surface to measure
wind, temperature, visibility, etc., but what is the normal way for
meteorologists to measure these things aloft? Do they depend on PIREPs, or
expendable/recoverable probes and balloons, or satellites, or what?



Tongue firmly in cheek They charter a Bell 47 helicopter and take it
up in increments of 1000 feet where they hover for a few seconds. They
roll down the window and use the "finger method" to determine wind speed
and direction. At altitudes above 30,000 feet they use the frozen toe
method to determine winds aloft and temperatures.
  #9  
Old July 23rd 08, 04:06 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Rocky Stevens
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 53
Default How do weather services get sky conditions above the surface?

On Jul 23, 10:05*am, "Steven P. McNicoll"
wrote:
wrote:
On Jul 23, 9:37 am, Mxsmanic wrote:
It's easy enough to establish measurement stations on the surface to
measure wind, temperature, visibility, etc., but what is the normal
way for meteorologists to measure these things aloft? Do they depend
on PIREPs, or expendable/recoverable probes and balloons, or
satellites, or what?


This is one of your poorest troll attempts, Anthony, you are a
disappointment. Please try to do better.


Do you folks that continue to respond to Mxsmanic, Bertie, Maxwell, and the
other trolls realize that if you had simply ignored them this would still be
a useful forum?


It would also be a useful forum if people actually answered the
questions posed, regardless of *who* is asking it. The OP's question
is perefectly valid, and x number of years from now when somebody
Google's for the answer and gets this thread, all they will see for an
answer are insults. There is nothing more frustrating than
Googling for an anwer to something only to find the response was "why
don't you Google for it". If you have the time to post such a
response, you have the time to answer the question.

  #10  
Old July 23rd 08, 04:15 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Steven P. McNicoll[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 721
Default How do weather services get sky conditions above the surface?

Rocky Stevens wrote:

It would also be a useful forum if people actually answered the
questions posed, regardless of *who* is asking it. The OP's question
is perefectly valid, and x number of years from now when somebody
Google's for the answer and gets this thread, all they will see for an
answer are insults. There is nothing more frustrating than
Googling for an anwer to something only to find the response was "why
don't you Google for it". If you have the time to post such a
response, you have the time to answer the question.


True, but the folks that post such a response probably don't know the
answer.


 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Aviation Weather Services, AC 00-45F Bob Gardner Piloting 1 December 20th 07 03:58 AM
Gliding Weather Services around the world [email protected] Soaring 9 May 3rd 07 09:42 AM
AF#2/conditions Christopher Range Piloting 11 October 26th 06 02:57 AM
National Weather Services Duties Act of 2005 Rob Piloting 0 September 7th 05 09:44 PM
Deicing during heavy weather conditions William W. Plummer Instrument Flight Rules 0 December 24th 04 02:12 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:21 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 AviationBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.