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Sad News: Michael Masterov



 
 
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  #11  
Old June 26th 08, 07:34 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
romeomike
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Posts: 51
Default Sad News: Michael Masterov

Journeyman wrote:
Long-time poster Michael (thisoldairplane.com) died yesterday, June 24
in Berrien County, Michigan when his motorcycle was hit by someone who
apparently ran a stop sign. The other driver was killed too.


Didn't know him but will miss his thoughtful and insightful posts. My
sympathy to those who did know him!
Ads
  #12  
Old June 26th 08, 10:32 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
[email protected]
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Posts: 2
Default Sad News: Michael Masterov

On Jun 26, 12:10 am, Journeyman wrote:
Long-time poster Michael (thisoldairplane.com) died yesterday, June 24
in Berrien County, Michigan when his motorcycle was hit by someone who
apparently ran a stop sign.


I became an avid reader of the rec.aviation.* groups in the summer of
2002, when I decided to learn to fly. Among the many valuable regular
contributors to the group, I soon felt that one stood out.

Over the next year or so, I meticuously crawled through the usenet
archives to absorb all of the knowledge and experience Michael shared
with us all. I believe I can safely say that I have read every single
post by Michael since he started posting back in 1993 or 1994.

In the spring of 2005, when I had something like 200 hours, I wrote to
Michael to ask if he would consider taking me on for two weeks of
intensive multiengine training. He was flattered that a pilot would
want to come all the way from Sweden to train with him (heíd already
had some students travel several hundred miles, but this was a new one
for him).

My two weeks in Houston with Michael were truly a great experience. We
flew twice during the weekends and every weekday evening, after
Michaelís day at work. Then we would get a beer (or cider) from the
fridge in Michaelís hanger and have a good time talking about
aviation.

The training Michael provided me with was nothing short of
spectacular.

We did a VMC demo on my third flight. Michael had me slow down to well
below redline, after which he cut an engine. I reacted instinctively
by pushing the power lever on the good engine to the stops. The
airplane immediately started a spin entry. This was the only time
during my stay that Michael touched the controls. If he hadnít
recovered right away we would have died. I understand quite a lot of
Twin Comanches were lost this way in the early days.

On the next flight I was treated to my first engine failure after take
off, at 50 feet. Michael was silent during the whole pattern to
landing. I was sweating, but I managed to recover from my errors and
get us back to the airport. Michaelís instructional philosophy was
always to force a student to operate in task saturation a fair portion
of the time and let the student make errors in critical flight
situations and learn from it.

Towards the end of my stay, we did a couple of Angel Flights (Michael
graciously offered me those flights for just the cost of the gas,
saying that he would have done the flights anyway and that those
flights were easy on the engines). On the way out, with the patient in
the back, Michael would teach me CRM concepts, while putting me
through LOFT training on the return leg. One night, coming back from
Fort Worth Meacham, Michael unexpectedly cut an engine on short final
to Weiserís runway 27. Despite doing everything by the book I had a
hell of a time getting the twin stopped on the 3400 ft runway. I swear
there was less than 10 feet of runway left before we came to a halt.
Michael was unphased, and told me his plan was to cut the mixtures and
steer us off towards the grass if he had felt I was losing it.

While we were having our usual beer, I told Michael he may want to
check the brakes, as I recalled I had had some difficulty holding the
airplane still during the run up at Fort Worth Meacham. ď**** me,
there IS no brakeĒ, he exclaimed after having had a look. It turned
out the brake was completely dead on one side. We had landed at
10:40PM, so it was probably well after 11PM by now, and Michael was
going to work the next day. Despite the late hour he would not leave
before fixing the problem. I got a very valuable lesson in airplane
maintenance that night, as Michael showed me how to disassemble the
brake assembly, replace the brake pads, manufacture a spacer that
turned out to be needed, do some safety wiring, and bleed the brakes.
Michael was quite proud that his low time student had been up to
handling a night single engine landing with one brake inoperative on a
poorly lit 3400 x 40 ft runway.

There were so many more things Michael taught me in the short time I
was there. Short and soft field landings at the soaring club of
Houston in the Tripacer, the basics of instrument flying (after a
couple of hours of good progress he had me try a CAT II single engine
landing under the hood, but that really proved to be too much of a
challenge for me), formation flying in the Twin with his friend Jim as
lead, and much, much more.

We stayed in touch regularly after I left. When I encountered an
aviation matter I didn't fully understand, I knew I could always turn
to Michael for an in depth explanation. I would write to Michael after
my trips throughout Europe and get some invaluable feedback that
invariably helped me to progress as a pilot.

In September of last year I was delighted to have the occasion to give
something back to Michael. He was in Paris on business for three
weeks, and I invited him to Sweden over a weekend. I knew he had
always wanted to fly a Slingsby T31 (an open cockpit wooden glider),
and there just happened to be one at one of the glider clubs where I
towed. I arranged a flight for him, as well as flights in several
other European designs that I knew he would never have the opportunity
to fly in the US.

I was demonstrating one of those airplanes, a KZ III taildragger, to
him before I would let him fly it. I had been tought to fly the KZ III
quite slowly on final, at 80 km/h or just over 40 kt, which
necessitated a rather abrupt flare at the last moment. I hadnít done
too many landings myself after getting checked out and hadnít really
reflected much on the appropriateness of the technique. It is an
indication of Michaelís skill level, that he could _feel_ I was doing
something wrong jus by sitting along in the right seat on his first
ever flight on the type. He suggested I increase the speed on final to
100 km/h and it was amazing how much easier it was to land that way.

Tomorrow I would have been heading to Michigan for four weeks of
training towards the instrument rating with Michael. Michael was an
instrument pilot above all, and I was looking forward to getting what
I knew would be the very best instrument training available to
anybody.

I was devastated by the terrible news Stephanie brought me yesterday.
I lost a dear friend and an exceptional mentor. Michael was the
aviator I will always strive to be.

/Thomas
  #13  
Old June 27th 08, 02:11 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
stshaffer
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Posts: 1
Default Sad News: Michael Masterov

Before reluctantly concluding that we couldn't swing the expense of
travel and the new much greater distance this year, I'd hoped to make
it the one in which I stayed up all night. Did it the very first year
I attended P'ville, laughing and talking and smoking and examining
whatever seemed like the great issues of the time and original humor,
late into the night with Michael and Highflyer. The hours were wee
indeed when I went off to roll up in my tent, but those two were still
at it, and repeated the all-night discourse on the first night of
every subsequent annual gathering.
To traditions, great and small,
and friends who share.

Stella
  #14  
Old July 1st 08, 05:49 AM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
[email protected]
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Posts: 2
Default Sad News: Michael Masterov

This tragic news hits me as a bit of shock.

I met Michael in 1993 on a drop zone...I was then the current World
Freestyle Skydiving Champion, who enjoys talking to any skydiver in
the joy of the sport. That's how I met Michael, yaking about
skydiving. He hadn't started flying at that time yet. We stayed in
touch through the years and when he started flying, I enjoyed e-
mailing with him about that, as other skydiving friends were
introducing me to some flying.

Some years ago, Michael took me up in his Tri-Pacer when he had it and
a few times in his Twin Comanche. It was an honor that he let me fly
and land both of them. In the Tri-Pacer, it was the very first time
he let someone else land, and it was the first time he let someone
land his twin.

It was a special privilege being one of his friends and being in his
company along with Highflyer, the duo they were, at the PJY fly-in
last month and looked forward to the next time.

Michael is special and it's wonderful that Journeyman has picked up
his domain and make a tribute page. I have some ideas, in addition to
those already suggested...

-Maybe a blog can be put there so people can write stories about being
with him, flying with him and to put some stories he told in hanger
flying.
-Maybe it's possible to find some of his students to document training
they have had with him to put on the page, and to include Thomas's
post from here (of course with his permission) and/or if Thomas would
like to write more.
-Maybe he has some training materials that he has written and used
with students that can be included on the page.

Back in 1998, when a dear skydiving friend of mine was killed, I
created a tribute page for him with the help of others...perhaps this
page might inspire some ideas.

http://www.koyn.com/JohnSchuman/index.htm

I'm willing to help with the tribute page in the effort to capture and
share with others what an incredible aviator and person he was.
Michael's aviation wisdom grew to proportions beyond what I could
imagine aviation wisdom to even be.

From deep in my heart, condolences to all who knew and loved him.

TK
http://www.koyn.com/CloudDancer/
  #15  
Old July 1st 08, 06:46 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
[email protected]
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Posts: 2
Default Sad News: Michael Masterov

Michael is special and it's wonderful that Journeyman has picked up
his domain and make a tribute page. *I have some ideas, in addition to
those already suggested...


Great suggestions!

-Maybe it's possible to find some of his students to document training
they have had with him to put on the page, and to include Thomas's
post from here (of course with his permission) and/or if Thomas would
like to write more


I would be honoured to contribute to capturing Michael's unique
teaching ability. I can certainly think of a few more stories that
should be worth working on.
.
-Maybe he has some training materials that he has written and used
with students that can be included on the page.


I know Michael was working on a multiengine text back in 2005. He was
thinking of having it published on order. I queried him about it last
fall and he told me progress was slow.

/Thomas
  #17  
Old July 8th 08, 06:31 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.aviation.ifr
StephanieM
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Posts: 3
Default Sad News: Michael Masterov

The local memorial service for Michael will be held at the Southwest
Michigan Airport from 1 to 2 pm on Saturday July 12. If anyone needs
more info please let me know.

Stephanie


  #18  
Old July 8th 08, 08:49 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Sad News: Michael Masterov

Thomas wrote:
I would be honoured to contribute to capturing Michael's unique
teaching ability. I can certainly think of a few more stories that
should be worth working on.


It would be wonderful to document this for others to read.

Thomas wrote:
I know Michael was working on a multiengine text back in 2005.


Maybe, somehow, a copy of this text can be added to his tribute page.

I saw what's there so far... http://www.thisoldairplane.com/

A nice gathering of his writings. But it does rely on google groups
to stay alive. If something were to happen to google groups, the web
site would no longer have access to the writings. Perhaps, the
writings should be gathered to put on the web site without reliance on
google groups? I wonder if anyone has the technical ability to
efficiently gather the writings...

And lay them together sorta like how it is at:

http://www.whittsflying.com/web/index.htm

Michael is special.

TK
http://www.koyn.com/CloudDancer/
  #19  
Old July 10th 08, 09:59 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
GinoM
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Posts: 1
Default Sad News: Michael Masterov

Sad news, indeed.


  #20  
Old July 15th 08, 09:45 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.aviation.ifr
Journeyman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 14
Default Sad News: Michael Masterov

With Tina's help, I put up a a page on www.thisoldairplane.com. We'll
be slowly adding material, including a link to this thread.

There's a guest book up if anyone wants to sign in.

Morris


["Followup-To:" header set to rec.aviation.piloting.]
On 2008-07-08, StephanieM wrote:
The local memorial service for Michael will be held at the Southwest
Michigan Airport from 1 to 2 pm on Saturday July 12. If anyone needs
more info please let me know.

Stephanie


 




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