A aviation & planes forum. AviationBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » AviationBanter forum » rec.aviation newsgroups » Piloting
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Absolute lowest altitude you can fly (legally)



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old January 2nd 07, 05:07 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.aviation.student
Mxsmanic
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,169
Default Absolute lowest altitude you can fly (legally)

What regulations determine the absolute lowest altitude you can fly
above the ground in the U.S.? I understand that the area just above
the ground is usually Class G outside airports, and it only goes up to
700 or 1200 feet most of the time ... which implies that you can
actually fly at 500 feet AGL if you want. But is there some other
regulation that prohibits aircraft from flying this low, in general or
in certain conditions/areas?

--
Transpose mxsmanic and gmail to reach me by e-mail.
Ads
  #2  
Old January 2nd 07, 05:46 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.aviation.student
Robert M. Gary
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,767
Default Absolute lowest altitude you can fly (legally)


Mxsmanic wrote:
What regulations determine the absolute lowest altitude you can fly
above the ground in the U.S.? I understand that the area just above
the ground is usually Class G outside airports, and it only goes up to
700 or 1200 feet most of the time ... which implies that you can
actually fly at 500 feet AGL if you want. But is there some other
regulation that prohibits aircraft from flying this low, in general or
in certain conditions/areas?


There was a video of a Yak that was making sparks on the runway. I
would say that's just about as low as you can go.

  #3  
Old January 2nd 07, 05:51 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.aviation.student
BT
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 995
Default Absolute lowest altitude you can fly (legally)

if you would take a ground school course..
they would teach you the FARs
BT

"Mxsmanic" wrote in message
...
What regulations determine the absolute lowest altitude you can fly
above the ground in the U.S.? I understand that the area just above
the ground is usually Class G outside airports, and it only goes up to
700 or 1200 feet most of the time ... which implies that you can
actually fly at 500 feet AGL if you want. But is there some other
regulation that prohibits aircraft from flying this low, in general or
in certain conditions/areas?

--
Transpose mxsmanic and gmail to reach me by e-mail.



  #4  
Old January 2nd 07, 05:52 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.aviation.student
Mark Hansen
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 420
Default Absolute lowest altitude you can fly (legally)

On 01/02/07 09:46, Robert M. Gary wrote:
Mxsmanic wrote:
What regulations determine the absolute lowest altitude you can fly
above the ground in the U.S.? I understand that the area just above
the ground is usually Class G outside airports, and it only goes up to
700 or 1200 feet most of the time ... which implies that you can
actually fly at 500 feet AGL if you want. But is there some other
regulation that prohibits aircraft from flying this low, in general or
in certain conditions/areas?


There was a video of a Yak that was making sparks on the runway. I
would say that's just about as low as you can go.


Well, I guess you can go lower if you don't mind making your own hole ;-\


--
Mark Hansen, PP-ASEL, Instrument Airplane
Cal Aggie Flying Farmers
Sacramento, CA
  #5  
Old January 2nd 07, 06:21 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 111
Default Absolute lowest altitude you can fly (legally)

Above open water, you can fly as low as you want, as long as you don't
buzz a boat or swimmer, etc.

Bud

On Jan 2, 9:07 am, Mxsmanic wrote:
What regulations determine the absolute lowest altitude you can fly
above the ground in the U.S.? I understand that the area just above
the ground is usually Class G outside airports, and it only goes up to
700 or 1200 feet most of the time ... which implies that you can
actually fly at 500 feet AGL if you want. But is there some other
regulation that prohibits aircraft from flying this low, in general or
in certain conditions/areas?

--
Transpose mxsmanic and gmail to reach me by e-mail.


  #7  
Old January 2nd 07, 06:37 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.aviation.student
Robert M. Gary
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,767
Default Absolute lowest altitude you can fly (legally)


BT wrote:
if you would take a ground school course..
they would teach you the FARs
BT


Or buy the King course.

  #8  
Old January 2nd 07, 07:12 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.aviation.student
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,130
Default Absolute lowest altitude you can fly (legally)


T o d d P a t t i s t wrote:
Mxsmanic wrote:

What regulations determine the absolute lowest altitude you can fly
above the ground in the U.S.?


It requires a minimum of:
"An altitude of 500 feet above the surface, except over open
water or sparsely populated areas. In those cases, the
aircraft may not be operated closer than 500 feet to any
person, vessel, vehicle, or structure."

"Congested areas" have higher minimums.


In Canada it's the same, with the proviso attached "except
when taking off or landing." It would be impossible to land or take off
at most airports if we had to stay 500' away from any person,
structure, vehicle or vessel.
Low flying kills people. There are unmarked wires, big birds,
unmarked or unlighted towers of all sorts. An engine failure at low
altitude means no options but pretty much straight ahead into whatever
is there. We've experienced several birdstrikes near the ground, and
just west of here is a 100' tower that must be under the minimum for
lighting, and it blends in really well with the ground. Every so often
someone snags a powerline they didn't see.

Dan

  #9  
Old January 2nd 07, 08:28 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.aviation.student
Mxsmanic
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,169
Default Absolute lowest altitude you can fly (legally)

BT writes:

if you would take a ground school course..
they would teach you the FARs


If you don't know the answer, you can save your time and not mine by
skipping the reply.

--
Transpose mxsmanic and gmail to reach me by e-mail.
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
AOPA Stall/Spin Study -- Stowell's Review (8,000 words) Rich Stowell Aerobatics 28 January 2nd 09 02:26 PM
why is intercept altitude labeled "LOC only"? Gary Drescher Instrument Flight Rules 32 September 23rd 06 09:00 PM
The Deaf vs. The Colorblind Bret Ludwig Piloting 17 August 21st 06 02:08 AM
Report Leaving Assigned Altitude? John Clonts Instrument Flight Rules 81 March 20th 04 02:34 PM
GPS Altitude with WAAS Phil Verghese Instrument Flight Rules 42 October 5th 03 12:39 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:54 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 AviationBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.