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One man rigging



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 23rd 08, 10:39 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Tom Nau
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Posts: 23
Default One man rigging

I am considering purchasing a one-man rigging system. Is there
consensus on the best system? Which one do you like? Thanks, Tom
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  #2  
Old March 23rd 08, 11:44 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Mike the Strike
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Posts: 952
Default One man rigging

On Mar 23, 3:39 pm, Tom Nau wrote:
I am considering purchasing a one-man rigging system. Is there
consensus on the best system? Which one do you like? Thanks, Tom


There are several good systems out there. I used to have one of
Udo's, which worked quite well for me. I now have the locally-made
(Arizona) WIngRigger, which is somewhat similar to the Udo design, but
with a couple of extra features. It has three big wheels - very
useful if you're not rigging on a smooth surface - and it doesn't fall
over like the Udo if you don't get the legs out (we've all done
that!). The WingRigger feature I find most useful is a gas-assist
lift mechanism rather than a mechanical or electric screwdrive that
some others have. This is simple and holds most of the weight of the
wing while you can make fine adjustments.

Whatever system you favor, I'd recommend getting your hands on one and
seeing it in action.

Mike
  #3  
Old March 24th 08, 02:06 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
[email protected]
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Posts: 9
Default One man rigging

On Mar 23, 4:44*pm, Mike the Strike wrote:
On Mar 23, 3:39 pm, Tom Nau wrote:

I am considering purchasing a one-man rigging system. *Is there
consensus on the best system? *Which one do you like? *Thanks, Tom


There are several good systems out there. *I used to have one of
Udo's, which worked quite well for me. *I now have the locally-made
(Arizona) WIngRigger, which is somewhat similar to the Udo design, but
with a couple of extra features. * *It has three big wheels - very
useful if you're not rigging on a smooth surface - and it doesn't fall
over like the Udo if you don't get the legs out (we've all done
that!). *The WingRigger feature I find most useful is a gas-assist
lift mechanism rather than a mechanical or electric screwdrive that
some others have. *This is simple and holds most of the weight of the
wing while you can make fine adjustments.

Whatever system you favor, I'd recommend getting your hands on one and
seeing it in action.

Mike


And, the latest edition has more great features. 1) it breaks down
into far smaller (and easier to store in your glider trailer)
pieces... sort of an upside down T with short bars and removable axles
that fit into each side, both of which can be adjusted to a narrow
width or wide stance, and 2) it is powder coated and has a clear coat
powder coat on top of that... classy looking and very weather
resistant. It comes with your choice of two different shape wing
holders (for fat wings like LS-3 or Pik or thin wings like ASW-27,
etc).

Bob T.
19
  #4  
Old March 24th 08, 07:17 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Chip Bearden
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Posts: 69
Default One man rigging

On Mar 23, 6:39*pm, Tom Nau wrote:
I am considering purchasing a one-man rigging system. *Is there
consensus on the best system? *Which one do you like? *Thanks, Tom


I've built a number of one-man rigging devices in the past, including
the WingMate (http://members.aol.com/wingstand/ )which I sold for a
while (and intend to in the future when I have more time, as I've been
saying for the past 8 years I've had my current job!). I've used my
WingMate nearly 100% of the time since 1982 plus a few others just for
comparison. Some questions you should ask:

1. Is this for airport use only? Many systems work great on smooth
asphalt. Some work well on smooth grass. I wanted one that worked
almost anywhere. There are tradeoffs with any type (see next
comment).
2. Is this for convenience, time saving, or back saving? I was focused
on the first two; I can normally rig my glider as fast unassisted as
with a helper, but I must lift and carry the spar of the wing--and, in
a separate step, the wingtip--just like I would with said helper. The
wheels on my system are there only to assist in aligning the wingtip
fore and aft. Most one-man systems carry the bulk of the wing weight
in a solid wheeled carriage (good if your back is sore) but require
somewhat more time to set up and rig the glider.
3. Will the wingstand remain set up (in the trailer hangar or van) or
will you have to set it up/break it down each time? I needed something
that would stow quickly in the front of the trailer. One conventional
type I took in trade took nearly as long to assemble for use as the
glider did and was so heavy that I hurt my back lifting it (assembled)
into my van. But I sold it to a pilot who left it set up in the hangar
at his club and he was happy with it.
4. Is this for occasional use, or every time you fly? Rigging a glider
isn't idiot proof. Using a one-man rig is even less so and requires
practice and care. The potential for damage is higher for several
reasons, mostly related to exposure to the wind and not having a
helper in case something goes wrong or you do something stupid. I've
had a couple of close calls in high winds plus a few bone-headed
incidents caused by inattention (none serious) in hundreds of uses. If
you're only going to do this once in a great while, I'd advise against
it.
5. What type of trailer do you have? Cobras/Komets are easy to adapt.
Most others can be made to work with varying amounts of effort and
modification depending on the trailer and the wingstand.

The original rig by the maker of the Cobra trailer seemed to work well
but was heavy and had a number of loose pieces to assemble. I've heard
good things about the Udo system. The WingRigger looks like a nice
evolution of Udo's rig and perhaps similar to the lightweight Louis
Loader which impressed me years ago in CT but which, alas, is no
longer made.

I'll close by relating something that Karl Striedieck told me.
Although I use mine every time I fly and wouldn't leave home without
it, apparently they are sometimes referred to in Europe as "no
friends" wingstands. Hopefully you aren't interested in this for that
reason.

Chip Bearden
ASW 24 "JB"
USA
  #5  
Old March 24th 08, 07:36 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
[email protected]
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Posts: 154
Default One man rigging

On Mar 24, 2:17*pm, Chip Bearden wrote:
On Mar 23, 6:39*pm, Tom Nau wrote:

I am considering purchasing a one-man rigging system. *Is there
consensus on the best system? *Which one do you like? *Thanks, Tom


I've built a number of one-man rigging devices in the past, including
the WingMate *(http://members.aol.com/wingstand/)which I sold for a
while (and intend to in the future when I have more time, as I've been
saying for the past 8 years I've had my current job!). I've used my
WingMate nearly 100% of the time since 1982 plus a few others just for
comparison. Some questions you should ask:

1. Is this for airport use only? Many systems work great on smooth
asphalt. Some work well on smooth grass. I wanted one that worked
almost anywhere. There are tradeoffs with any type (see next
comment).
2. Is this for convenience, time saving, or back saving? I was focused
on the first two; I can normally rig my glider as fast unassisted as
with a helper, but I must lift and carry the spar of the wing--and, in
a separate step, the wingtip--just like I would with said helper. The
wheels on my system are there only to assist in aligning the wingtip
fore and aft. Most one-man systems carry the bulk of the wing weight
in a solid wheeled carriage (good if your back is sore) but require
somewhat more time to set up and rig the glider.
3. Will the wingstand remain set up (in the trailer hangar or van) or
will you have to set it up/break it down each time? I needed something
that would stow quickly in the front of the trailer. One conventional
type I took in trade took nearly as long to assemble for use as the
glider did and was so heavy that I hurt my back lifting it (assembled)
into my van. But I sold it to a pilot who left it set up in the hangar
at his club and he was happy with it.
4. Is this for occasional use, or every time you fly? Rigging a glider
isn't idiot proof. Using a one-man rig is even less so and requires
practice and care. The potential for damage is higher for several
reasons, mostly related to exposure to the wind and not having a
helper in case something goes wrong or you do something stupid. I've
had a couple of close calls in high winds plus a few bone-headed
incidents caused by inattention (none serious) in hundreds of uses. If
you're only going to do this once in a great while, I'd advise against
it.
5. What type of trailer do you have? Cobras/Komets are easy to adapt.
Most others can be made to work with varying amounts of effort and
modification depending on the trailer and the wingstand.

The original rig by the maker of the Cobra trailer seemed to work well
but was heavy and had a number of loose pieces to assemble. I've heard
good things about the Udo system. The WingRigger looks like a nice
evolution of Udo's rig and perhaps similar to the lightweight Louis
Loader which impressed me years ago in CT but which, alas, is no
longer made.

I'll close by relating something that Karl Striedieck told me.
Although I use mine every time I fly and wouldn't leave home without
it, apparently they are sometimes referred to in Europe as "no
friends" wingstands. Hopefully you aren't interested in this for that
reason.

Chip Bearden
ASW 24 "JB"
USA


We use small wing-root dollies and a wing stand with roller on top
made from hardware store supplies. Very inexpensive (less then $50)
and simple to use. The best part is the wing stays very low when
wheeling it around into position (no tipping over). The root dolly is
hinged where the spar sits so we can transition the wings from
vertical to flat before lifting the tip to get it onto the roller
stand. The root stays on the dolly until it's time to insert the spar
into the fuselage. At that point, the wing is almost centered on the
roller stand, so the root end is pretty light to lift. The roller on
the stand allows me to easily "roll" the wing into the fuselage while
I guide the pins home. The only heavy lifting is the 3 or 4 seconds to
lift the root spar off the trailer dolly and onto the wheeled wing-
root dolly. It takes me about 15-20 minutes to get the wings rigged
using this setup. (I have an LS1f by the way)
  #6  
Old March 25th 08, 01:13 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
[email protected]
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Posts: 56
Default One man rigging

On Mar 23, 6:39�pm, Tom Nau wrote:
I am considering purchasing a one-man rigging system. �Is there
consensus on the best system? �Which one do you like? �Thanks, Tom


Like so many procedures in rigging/derigging what it takes is frequent
practise to get the system to work well for you . I have had an Udo
system for many years and have found it to be an excellent one . For
example I find that setting the wingstand heights to the rigged height
of the wings really helps when it comes to sliding the wings into
place . Too high or too low obviously makes for a much longer rigging
process . I'd say I can rig on my own in less than 5 minutes with the
system after the first few times each new season.

Ron (ZA)
  #7  
Old March 25th 08, 01:30 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
toad
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Posts: 229
Default One man rigging

On Mar 23, 6:39 pm, Tom Nau wrote:
I am considering purchasing a one-man rigging system. Is there
consensus on the best system? Which one do you like? Thanks, Tom


I'll give another vote for Udo's version. Its incredibly strong and
secure. It only takes about 1-2 minutes to get out of my trailer and
assembled. The wing is held in the saddle very securely. I like the
mechanical screw height adjustment because it is repeatable. You can
eyeball the root and think "needs about 3 turns up", make the
adjustment and check alignment.

Takes me about 15 min from start to fully assemble (not tape) a Grob
102 by myself.

Todd
3S
  #8  
Old March 27th 08, 12:05 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Andy[_1_]
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Posts: 1,565
Default One man rigging

On Mar 23, 3:39*pm, Tom Nau wrote:
I am considering purchasing a one-man rigging system. *Is there
consensus on the best system? *Which one do you like? *Thanks, Tom


I use the WingRigger. I was an early customer so I didn't get the
later mods. I'm not concerned about that since it works very well. I
rig my 28 solo with it and several times have been able to get both
wings on without any readjustment of the wing position. It takes me
probably less than 3-5 minutes longer to rig with the WIngRigger than
with an experienced helper. Add a couple of minutes for getting it
out of the trailer. That's much better than waiting half an hour for
the next pilot to arrive at the field. It's so easy to use that I
often rig solo even when help is available.

I find removal of the wings a little more awkward than assembly and
usually get help if someone is nearby. On the other hand I have
removed the wings solo with winds gusting over 15kts and been just as
comfortable as if I had used a live helper.

The WingRigger avoids any heavy root lifting and there is less risk of
the spar damaging the fuselage than if an inexperienced helper is
used.

I have not used Udo's rig so can't compare the two.

Andy
  #9  
Old March 27th 08, 01:04 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
JJ Sinclair
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Posts: 388
Default One man rigging


I find removal of the wings a little more awkward than assembly and
usually get help if someone is nearby. *On the other hand I have
removed the wings solo with winds gusting over 15kts and been just as
comfortable as if I had used a live helper.


Andy, when de-rigging, I set the wing rigger all the way down then put
it in place on the first wing. I then lift the other wing and put in
the wing stand. I have di-rigged in 20 knot winds (solo), but the
trailer must be in line with the wind and keep the wing horizontal
until you get aligned with the trailer before you rotate to the
vertical...................some have called wing assembly tools, "wing
destroyers", but they have tried to put wings away without aligning
the trailer into the prevailing wind. My rule is simple; Above 10
knots of cross-wind, either re-position the trailer or don't de-rig!
On assembly, I set the fuselage hydraulic jack a tad low, then simply
pump with one foot as I watch the main wing pin holes come into
alignment and help them a tad with my hunk of broom
handle...........slick'er 'en snot!
JJ
  #10  
Old March 27th 08, 04:28 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
5Z
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Posts: 405
Default One man rigging

If using a rigging dolly in wild, it's best to have a helper. The
helper should be at the dolly, NOT at the wingtip. I always keep the
leading edge down while maneuvering because this lowers the CG a bit,
lets me see where the wheels are and the wing won't shift in the
cradle like it can with it flat. The assistant's job is to hold the
trailing edge clamp hardware and push/pull to keep the rig from
tipping over.

I also follow JJ's process regarding pin alignment, doing all height
adjustments with the hydraulic fuselage jack.

-Tom
 




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