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Have you ever seen a C-130 Hercules trying to do a hover over the runway ?



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 16th 04, 01:20 PM
Iwan Bogels
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Have you ever seen a C-130 Hercules trying to do a hover over the runway ?

Check out http://www.dappa.nl/crash.htm

This video is about a (then) highly classified project to land a C-130 at a
soccer field, and get it back airborne from the same field with even more
load than during landing. The landing test caused the Herc to virtually
hover over the site, and the video is almost inbelieveble.



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  #2  
Old December 16th 04, 04:12 PM
Steven P. McNicoll
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Iwan Bogels" wrote in message
...

Check out http://www.dappa.nl/crash.htm

This video is about a (then) highly classified project to land a C-130 at
a
soccer field, and get it back airborne from the same field with even more
load than during landing. The landing test caused the Herc to virtually
hover over the site, and the video is almost inbelieveble.


It isn't mentioned on the site or in the video, but this wasn't just some
experiment to see how short a C-130 can land. The goal was to get in and
out of a sports stadium in Teheran to rescue the American hostages held in
Iran in 1979-1980.


  #3  
Old December 16th 04, 07:25 PM
Iwan Bogels
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

This was the full story that I posted on other groups:

On November 4, 1979, Iranian militants stormed the United States Embassy in
Tehran and took approximately seventy Americans captive. This terrorist act
lasted 444 days and during this period the US tried to think of several ways
to set the hostages free.

One revolutionary idea was to land a C-130 Hercules at a soccer field near
the hostage site and set the hostages free with military force. As a soccer
field in the middle of a city is virtually impossible to use as a landing
site, the USAF had to make drastic conversions to their aircraft in order to
even think of a chance of success.

The result was the "Credible Sport" project, in which four regular C-130H
aircraft were converted into YMC-130H specials with ESTOL (Extremely Short
Take Off and Landing) capabilities. In order to achieve the ultra short
landing and take-off, several rockets had to be installed to force the
aircraft to a quick stop and get it back airborne with a full load of people
within 300 feet. It was determined that 180,000 of thrust, equal to nearly
20 times the C-130's standard turboprop engines, would be required to get a
C-130 off in the length of a soccer field and over the surrounding
obstructions. The plane would be 300 feet in the air after traveling 300
feet forward and with a take off roll of just 100 feet.

Forward pointing rockets were installed to provide reverse thrust during
landing, as well as downward pointed rockets to cushon the landing. In order
to bring such a heavy aircraft to a quick stop, the amount of rocket power
was unprecedented. Needless to say that this aircraft had to be tested
before it could be used in action, and unfortunately the first test flight
did not go as planned.

See the test for yourself at http://www.dappa.nl/crash.htm




"Steven P. McNicoll" schreef in bericht
k.net...

"Iwan Bogels" wrote in message
...

Check out http://www.dappa.nl/crash.htm

This video is about a (then) highly classified project to land a C-130

at
a
soccer field, and get it back airborne from the same field with even

more
load than during landing. The landing test caused the Herc to virtually
hover over the site, and the video is almost inbelieveble.


It isn't mentioned on the site or in the video, but this wasn't just some
experiment to see how short a C-130 can land. The goal was to get in and
out of a sports stadium in Teheran to rescue the American hostages held in
Iran in 1979-1980.




  #4  
Old December 16th 04, 08:21 PM
William W. Plummer
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Iwan Bogels wrote:
This was the full story that I posted on other groups:

On November 4, 1979, Iranian militants stormed the United States Embassy in
Tehran and took approximately seventy Americans captive. This terrorist act
lasted 444 days and during this period the US tried to think of several ways
to set the hostages free.

One revolutionary idea was to land a C-130 Hercules at a soccer field near
the hostage site and set the hostages free with military force. As a soccer
field in the middle of a city is virtually impossible to use as a landing
site, the USAF had to make drastic conversions to their aircraft in order to
even think of a chance of success.

The result was the "Credible Sport" project, in which four regular C-130H
aircraft were converted into YMC-130H specials with ESTOL (Extremely Short
Take Off and Landing) capabilities. In order to achieve the ultra short
landing and take-off, several rockets had to be installed to force the
aircraft to a quick stop and get it back airborne with a full load of people
within 300 feet. It was determined that 180,000 of thrust, equal to nearly
20 times the C-130's standard turboprop engines, would be required to get a
C-130 off in the length of a soccer field and over the surrounding
obstructions. The plane would be 300 feet in the air after traveling 300
feet forward and with a take off roll of just 100 feet.

Forward pointing rockets were installed to provide reverse thrust during
landing, as well as downward pointed rockets to cushon the landing. In order
to bring such a heavy aircraft to a quick stop, the amount of rocket power
was unprecedented. Needless to say that this aircraft had to be tested
before it could be used in action, and unfortunately the first test flight
did not go as planned.

See the test for yourself at http://www.dappa.nl/crash.htm




"Steven P. McNicoll" schreef in bericht
k.net...

"Iwan Bogels" wrote in message
...

Check out http://www.dappa.nl/crash.htm

This video is about a (then) highly classified project to land a C-130


at

a
soccer field, and get it back airborne from the same field with even


more

load than during landing. The landing test caused the Herc to virtually
hover over the site, and the video is almost inbelieveble.


It isn't mentioned on the site or in the video, but this wasn't just some
experiment to see how short a C-130 can land. The goal was to get in and
out of a sports stadium in Teheran to rescue the American hostages held in
Iran in 1979-1980.


There was a famous experiment to prove that a fully loaded C-130 could
land on a carrier. The roll-out was 270 feet. Thrust reversers were
used before it was on the deck. I'll bet those landings left something
to be desired for comfort. I think I can find a short video of the
landings and will be happy to post it if someone can tell me where.
  #5  
Old December 16th 04, 08:29 PM
Andrew Venor
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

William W. Plummer wrote:
Iwan Bogels wrote:

This was the full story that I posted on other groups:

On November 4, 1979, Iranian militants stormed the United States
Embassy in
Tehran and took approximately seventy Americans captive. This
terrorist act
lasted 444 days and during this period the US tried to think of
several ways
to set the hostages free.

One revolutionary idea was to land a C-130 Hercules at a soccer field
near
the hostage site and set the hostages free with military force. As a
soccer
field in the middle of a city is virtually impossible to use as a landing
site, the USAF had to make drastic conversions to their aircraft in
order to
even think of a chance of success.

The result was the "Credible Sport" project, in which four regular C-130H
aircraft were converted into YMC-130H specials with ESTOL (Extremely
Short
Take Off and Landing) capabilities. In order to achieve the ultra short
landing and take-off, several rockets had to be installed to force the
aircraft to a quick stop and get it back airborne with a full load of
people
within 300 feet. It was determined that 180,000 of thrust, equal to
nearly
20 times the C-130's standard turboprop engines, would be required to
get a
C-130 off in the length of a soccer field and over the surrounding
obstructions. The plane would be 300 feet in the air after traveling 300
feet forward and with a take off roll of just 100 feet.

Forward pointing rockets were installed to provide reverse thrust during
landing, as well as downward pointed rockets to cushon the landing. In
order
to bring such a heavy aircraft to a quick stop, the amount of rocket
power
was unprecedented. Needless to say that this aircraft had to be tested
before it could be used in action, and unfortunately the first test
flight
did not go as planned.

See the test for yourself at http://www.dappa.nl/crash.htm




"Steven P. McNicoll" schreef in bericht
k.net...

"Iwan Bogels" wrote in message
...

Check out http://www.dappa.nl/crash.htm

This video is about a (then) highly classified project to land a C-130



at

a
soccer field, and get it back airborne from the same field with even



more

load than during landing. The landing test caused the Herc to virtually
hover over the site, and the video is almost inbelieveble.


It isn't mentioned on the site or in the video, but this wasn't just
some
experiment to see how short a C-130 can land. The goal was to get in
and
out of a sports stadium in Teheran to rescue the American hostages
held in
Iran in 1979-1980.



There was a famous experiment to prove that a fully loaded C-130 could
land on a carrier. The roll-out was 270 feet. Thrust reversers were
used before it was on the deck. I'll bet those landings left something
to be desired for comfort. I think I can find a short video of the
landings and will be happy to post it if someone can tell me where.


Air and Space Smithsonian Magazine has footage of a C-130 landing and
launching from the Forestall on their web site.

http://www.airandspacemagazine.com/a...e/QT/menu.html

ALV
  #6  
Old December 17th 04, 11:47 PM
C.D.Damron
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"William W. Plummer" wrote in
message news:[email protected]_s04...
Iwan Bogels wrote:
There was a famous experiment to prove that a fully loaded C-130 could
land on a carrier. The roll-out was 270 feet. Thrust reversers were
used before it was on the deck. I'll bet those landings left something
to be desired for comfort. I think I can find a short video of the
landings and will be happy to post it if someone can tell me where.


I don't think that pitch was reversed in those trials.


  #7  
Old December 18th 04, 12:03 AM
Bob Moore
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"C.D.Damron" wrote

I don't think that pitch was reversed in those trials.


It sure-as-hell was! I observed the official USN film at
the time and the narator stated that the co-pilot had
used the over-ride for the reverse lock-out and reversed
the engines at about 3' above the deck while the pilot
flew to touchdown.

Bob Moore
Naval Aviator 1958-1967
 




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