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EASA licence and insurance



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 27th 17, 09:16 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Andrew Ainslie
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Default EASA licence and insurance

Hi all,

I'm lending my glider to a British pilot who has an EASA licence. I just called Costello up and asked what I needed to add him to my insurance, and they said that he needed a "USA add-on". Anyone know what they're talking about? I thought an EASA licence was internationally accepted. Anyone been through this with a friend or competitive pilot? Thanks in advance!
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  #2  
Old February 27th 17, 11:07 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
[email protected]
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Default EASA licence and insurance

On Monday, February 27, 2017 at 3:16:55 PM UTC-6, Andrew Ainslie wrote:
Hi all,

I'm lending my glider to a British pilot who has an EASA licence. I just called Costello up and asked what I needed to add him to my insurance, and they said that he needed a "USA add-on". Anyone know what they're talking about? I thought an EASA licence was internationally accepted. Anyone been through this with a friend or competitive pilot? Thanks in advance!


Call your local FSDO. In my case they issued a US license based on my German glider license. Valid as long as the German license is maintained/extended. It was quick and easy.
  #3  
Old February 28th 17, 12:11 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Andrew Ainslie
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Default EASA licence and insurance

Is it a walk in thing or does it require time? He is intending to compete in Florida and has limited time, so this is a setback. We both assumed that the EASA license was sufficient to be legal in the US for contest flying.
  #4  
Old February 28th 17, 12:35 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
2KA
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Default EASA licence and insurance

You can't fly a glider of US registry with just an EASA license. You could fly a glider of European registry in the US with one, but to fly a glider of US registry you need a US license.

FSDOs vary on how much of a pain this can be. Call your local FSDO in advance to make arrangements.
  #5  
Old February 28th 17, 01:07 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
C-FFKQ (42)
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Default EASA licence and insurance

When I wanted to get my US courtesy licence based on my Canadian licence, I had to first submit all of my documentation to the FAA in Oklahoma City. They verified the documents and then told me to get an appointment with a FSDO.

Orlando FSDO was very good to me.

Total process took about 3 months.
  #6  
Old February 28th 17, 02:23 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Citrus Soaring
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Default EASA licence and insurance

He can apply for a US based on foreign certificate that would allow him to fly. FAA DPE with administrative authority can issue this in person. Have him look up the requirements for the US based on foreign and as long as he supplies the appropriate information it can be completed in a very short time.

If I can assist with this I will be happy to help.

Franklin Burbank
FAA DPE
  #7  
Old February 28th 17, 02:57 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
[email protected]
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Default EASA licence and insurance

On Monday, February 27, 2017 at 9:23:22 PM UTC-5, Citrus Soaring wrote:
He can apply for a US based on foreign certificate that would allow him to fly. FAA DPE with administrative authority can issue this in person. Have him look up the requirements for the US based on foreign and as long as he supplies the appropriate information it can be completed in a very short time.

If I can assist with this I will be happy to help.

Franklin Burbank
FAA DPE


Getting a reciprocal certificate should be not all that hard, as long as he does his homework and is prepared.
He will also have to accomplish a flight review prior to using the the certificate.
UH
  #8  
Old February 28th 17, 03:18 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Ross[_3_]
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Default EASA licence and insurance

The EASA say that the glider licence is valid worldwide, but the US say it is not. NZ is the same.

So why did we all go to the hassel of getting EASA licences? It does make you wonder...

  #9  
Old February 28th 17, 03:42 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Andrew Ainslie
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Posts: 66
Default EASA licence and insurance

Thank you everyone for the help! We have tight deadlines but may be able to get this done. the key issue is, where is the glider registered? If the glider is US registered, they need the FAA document no matter what other licence they have. If hey arrivewith their own glider, then they can use the EASA route... or at least that's as I now understand it.

Unfotunately that subtlety was lost on the BGA representative that Jon, the affected pilot, spoke to, so that he was misled into thinking that everything was hunky dory with his EASA licence. It was only when I called Costello to add him to my insurance that we realized we had a problem!

  #10  
Old February 28th 17, 08:25 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Default EASA licence and insurance

Le mardi 28 février 2017 16:18:05 UTC+1, Ross a écrit*:
The EASA say that the glider licence is valid worldwide, but the US say it is not. NZ is the same.

So why did we all go to the hassel of getting EASA licences? It does make you wonder...


First, there are two EASA gliding licences: the SPL that is ICAO-conform and is thus "valid" wordlwide; or the LAPL(S) that is non-conform and is only valid in EASA countries.

But "valid" doesn't mean you can use it exactly like at home. You have to adjust to local regulations. It's the same the other way round: you'll need a validation for an American licence in Europe. This is what EASA says:

ANNEX III
CONDITIONS FOR THE ACCEPTANCE OF LICENCES ISSUED BY OR ON BEHALF OF THIRD COUNTRIES
A. VALIDATION OF LICENCES
General
1. A pilot licence issued in compliance with the requirements of Annex 1 to the Chicago Convention by a third country may be validated by the competent authority of a Member State. Pilots shall apply to the competent authority of the Member State where they reside or are established, or, if they are not residing in the territory of the Member States, where the operator for which they are flying or intend to fly has its principal place of business..
2. The period of validation of a licence shall not exceed 1 year, provided that the basic licence remains valid.
 




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