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(sorta OT) Free Ham Radio Course



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 17th 05, 07:59 PM
RST Engineering
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default (sorta OT) Free Ham Radio Course

With the crossbreeding of amateur (ham) radio operators and pilots being
something on the order of 25%, this is only slightly OT.

There is a free online ham radio course being offered and sponsored by RST
Engineering. It is intended to take anybody with an interest in getting a
ham radio license from zero knowledge through at least enough knowledge to
pass the written exam. There is no practical exam for a ham license; pass
the written and you am one. The site is intended to take somebody with no
prior knowledge of the subject to be ready to pass at least one class of
license within 30 days.

There are no time limits. Study at your own pace; my college class is
taking the exam(s) on the 26th of February, but the rest of the world can
take whatever time they see fit. I will suggest that total immersion is the
best way to study this subject. If you don't want to buy the study guide
books from the sources that I recommend, most college and municipal
libraries either have them or can get them temporarily for a small fee.

While I wrote this site specifically for my college electronics class
students, with it being on the web, anybody in the USA and possessions can
use the site to study for the license. There is virtually nowhere in the
USA that there are not volunteer examiners within a short distance of your
home. Jay Honeck, for example, you, Mary, and the kids could take your
exams in Davenport, Moline, Mt. Carroll, Waterloo, or Dubuque. (See
http://www.arrl.org/arrlvec/examsearch.phtml for the location closest to
you.) There is a nominal fee between zero and $15 charged by the
organization that prints, mails, examines, and files the paperwork to cover
their costs of doing business.

There are three classes of license:

Technician has no code and an elementary theory and regulations exam. It
permits limited operation below 30 MHz., but grants all privileges from 30
MHz. on up.

General has a 5wpm code exam and a moderate theory and regulations exam. It
permits almost all operation on any amateur radio band, with little tiny
slices here and there reserved for the ...

Extra has a 5wpm code exam and a rather extensive theory and regulations
exam. It permits all operations on any amateur radio band.

This site is brought to you by RST Engineering, written by Jim (WX6RST), and
the website maintained by Gailla (KB9MII) who is also using the site to
upgrade from Technician to either General or Extra. Enjoy.

Jim

(Besides, just think of the hewmongous flame wars we could get into by
arguing whether it is or is not legal for a ham to install a ham radio in
their very own airplane {;-) )


  #2  
Old January 17th 05, 08:06 PM
RST Engineering
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I suppose it would help if I posted the URL, huh?

www.rstengineering.com/hamradio

Jim


"RST Engineering" wrote in message
...
With the crossbreeding of amateur (ham) radio operators and pilots being
something on the order of 25%, this is only slightly OT.



  #3  
Old January 17th 05, 10:10 PM
AL Mills
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

RST Engineering wrote:
I suppose it would help if I posted the URL, huh?

www.rstengineering.com/hamradio

Jim


"RST Engineering" wrote in message
...

With the crossbreeding of amateur (ham) radio operators and pilots being
something on the order of 25%, this is only slightly OT.





Good answer...LOL!
AL
  #4  
Old January 17th 05, 10:25 PM
Peter Duniho
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"RST Engineering" wrote in message
...
With the crossbreeding of amateur (ham) radio operators and pilots being
something on the order of 25%, this is only slightly OT.


Bull****. It's 100% off-topic in rec.aviation.hombuilt AND
rec.aviation.piloting. There's no "crossbreeding", and I guarantee you that
it's not true that 25% of all pilots are amateur radio operators. Even if
it were, that doesn't make your post on-topic here.

Not that you'd care, of course. You always do what you want, and call
anyone that doesn't like it an "asshole". But why would you bother lying
about the appropriateness of your actions?


  #5  
Old January 17th 05, 11:03 PM
Wayne Paul
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Jim,

Thank you for the post. I have several fellow aviators and family members
that are interested.

Respectfully,
H Wayne Paul
W7ADK
HP-14 (N990)
http://www.soaridaho.com/

"RST Engineering" wrote in message
...
With the crossbreeding of amateur (ham) radio operators and pilots being
something on the order of 25%, this is only slightly OT.

There is a free online ham radio course being offered and sponsored by RST
Engineering. It is intended to take anybody with an interest in getting a
ham radio license from zero knowledge through at least enough knowledge to
pass the written exam. There is no practical exam for a ham license; pass
the written and you am one. The site is intended to take somebody with no
prior knowledge of the subject to be ready to pass at least one class of
license within 30 days.

There are no time limits. Study at your own pace; my college class is
taking the exam(s) on the 26th of February, but the rest of the world can
take whatever time they see fit. I will suggest that total immersion is

the
best way to study this subject. If you don't want to buy the study guide
books from the sources that I recommend, most college and municipal
libraries either have them or can get them temporarily for a small fee.

While I wrote this site specifically for my college electronics class
students, with it being on the web, anybody in the USA and possessions can
use the site to study for the license. There is virtually nowhere in the
USA that there are not volunteer examiners within a short distance of your
home. Jay Honeck, for example, you, Mary, and the kids could take your
exams in Davenport, Moline, Mt. Carroll, Waterloo, or Dubuque. (See
http://www.arrl.org/arrlvec/examsearch.phtml for the location closest to
you.) There is a nominal fee between zero and $15 charged by the
organization that prints, mails, examines, and files the paperwork to

cover
their costs of doing business.

There are three classes of license:

Technician has no code and an elementary theory and regulations exam. It
permits limited operation below 30 MHz., but grants all privileges from 30
MHz. on up.

General has a 5wpm code exam and a moderate theory and regulations exam.

It
permits almost all operation on any amateur radio band, with little tiny
slices here and there reserved for the ...

Extra has a 5wpm code exam and a rather extensive theory and regulations
exam. It permits all operations on any amateur radio band.

This site is brought to you by RST Engineering, written by Jim (WX6RST),

and
the website maintained by Gailla (KB9MII) who is also using the site to
upgrade from Technician to either General or Extra. Enjoy.

Jim

(Besides, just think of the hewmongous flame wars we could get into by
arguing whether it is or is not legal for a ham to install a ham radio in
their very own airplane {;-) )




  #6  
Old January 17th 05, 11:13 PM
Gene Seibel
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I'm one of the 25% that already has a license, but thanks for the
offer.
--
Gene Seibel KB0NNN
Gene & Sue's Aeroplanes - http://pad39a.com/gene/planes.html
Because I fly, I envy no one.

  #7  
Old January 17th 05, 11:27 PM
Vaughn
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Peter Duniho" wrote in message
...
Bull****. It's 100% off-topic in rec.aviation.hombuilt AND
rec.aviation.piloting. There's no "crossbreeding", and I guarantee you that
it's not true that 25% of all pilots are amateur radio operators.


Really?

Vaughn (CFI) (WB4UHB)






  #8  
Old January 17th 05, 11:27 PM
Ron Webb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Bull****. It's 100% off-topic in rec.aviation.hombuilt AND
rec.aviation.piloting. There's no "crossbreeding



Well...I can tell you for a fact there is at least ONE "crossbreed" here. I
suspect you are right about the 25% thing though. At least 25% of the Hams I
know are (or were) pilots, but pilots who are also Hams are rarer.

As for whether it is on topic - there has been a thread here about how to do
an antenna on a composite aircraft. A Ham would have no trouble building a
half wave dipole with a gamma match for 120 MHz, I would outperform a
grounded quarter wave and it would cost almost nothing. But I guess a PILOT
is too good for that!?!!



Ron Webb
KA6BDM
Experimental Pacer N5158G


  #9  
Old January 17th 05, 11:34 PM
tom418
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thanks, Jim

Tom KAZ8872
"Vaughn" wrote in message
...

"Peter Duniho" wrote in message
...
Bull****. It's 100% off-topic in rec.aviation.hombuilt AND
rec.aviation.piloting. There's no "crossbreeding", and I guarantee you

that
it's not true that 25% of all pilots are amateur radio operators.


Really?

Vaughn (CFI) (WB4UHB)








  #10  
Old January 18th 05, 01:10 AM
Peter Dohm
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thanks Jim,

Apparently, things have really changed. Years ago, you needed at least 5
wpm of code for just about everything except a small part of the two meter
band; and I never managed to devote enough time to accomplish it.

It's obviously time for another look!

Peter

p.s.: I did find that a code tape at bed time cured insomnia.

"RST Engineering" wrote in message
...
With the crossbreeding of amateur (ham) radio operators and pilots being
something on the order of 25%, this is only slightly OT.

There is a free online ham radio course being offered and sponsored by RST
Engineering. It is intended to take anybody with an interest in getting a
ham radio license from zero knowledge through at least enough knowledge to
pass the written exam. There is no practical exam for a ham license; pass
the written and you am one. The site is intended to take somebody with no
prior knowledge of the subject to be ready to pass at least one class of
license within 30 days.

There are no time limits. Study at your own pace; my college class is
taking the exam(s) on the 26th of February, but the rest of the world can
take whatever time they see fit. I will suggest that total immersion is

the
best way to study this subject. If you don't want to buy the study guide
books from the sources that I recommend, most college and municipal
libraries either have them or can get them temporarily for a small fee.

While I wrote this site specifically for my college electronics class
students, with it being on the web, anybody in the USA and possessions can
use the site to study for the license. There is virtually nowhere in the
USA that there are not volunteer examiners within a short distance of your
home. Jay Honeck, for example, you, Mary, and the kids could take your
exams in Davenport, Moline, Mt. Carroll, Waterloo, or Dubuque. (See
http://www.arrl.org/arrlvec/examsearch.phtml for the location closest to
you.) There is a nominal fee between zero and $15 charged by the
organization that prints, mails, examines, and files the paperwork to

cover
their costs of doing business.

There are three classes of license:

Technician has no code and an elementary theory and regulations exam. It
permits limited operation below 30 MHz., but grants all privileges from 30
MHz. on up.

General has a 5wpm code exam and a moderate theory and regulations exam.

It
permits almost all operation on any amateur radio band, with little tiny
slices here and there reserved for the ...

Extra has a 5wpm code exam and a rather extensive theory and regulations
exam. It permits all operations on any amateur radio band.

This site is brought to you by RST Engineering, written by Jim (WX6RST),

and
the website maintained by Gailla (KB9MII) who is also using the site to
upgrade from Technician to either General or Extra. Enjoy.

Jim

(Besides, just think of the hewmongous flame wars we could get into by
arguing whether it is or is not legal for a ham to install a ham radio in
their very own airplane {;-) )




 




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