A aviation & planes forum. AviationBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » AviationBanter forum » rec.aviation newsgroups » Soaring
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

We need an ASW-19 rebirth for $25,000



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #111  
Old March 23rd 17, 11:07 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 231
Default We need an ASW-19 rebirth for $25,000


From what I've observed, shared ownership of gliders in the US has been rather rare, though it is a bit more common in my club today than it's been in the past 20 years. Splitting the cost and expenses four ways certainly should make several gliders attractive.


Frank Whiteley


Shared ownership was the norm when I was growing up at what is now Caesar Creek Soaring Club in the mid 1960s. Typically 2 but up to 8 partners. My dad had a partner who flew only on Sundays; we went to church so my dad flew on Saturdays and at contests. I started out with a 1/8 share of a 1-26 (one specific weekend day a month) but flew as much as I wanted because so few of my partners did.

What changed? Lifestyles. I'm not wealthy but earlier in my career I had more money than time regarding gliders so I own my glider outright. I never knew when I'd have a weekend day free and wanted to fly without having to coordinate with a partner. I fly contests and didn't want conflicts there, either.

Shared ownership is less expensive. But cost is only part of the problem. Club gliders and shared ownership gliders often sit on the ground even on good weekend soaring days. Soaring takes a lot of time and is tough on families (although we tried to make it fun for my daughters growing up, with some success). It's tough and frustrating to learn how. It's completely weather dependent so you can't plan ahead. There's a lot more ground time than flying time. Without a motorglider, you're dependent on others for launching and retrieves. You can spend hours waiting for both the former and the latter. Etc.

It's never going to be widely popular, either for participants or spectators. And I'd argue those two aren't that related anyway.

From a purely selfish perspective (the shame of it!), I just hope soaring survives long enough for me to continue enjoying it for a while longer and then sell my glider.

Chip Bearden
Ads
  #112  
Old Yesterday, 02:49 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Frank Whiteley
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,673
Default We need an ASW-19 rebirth for $25,000

On Thursday, March 23, 2017 at 4:07:24 PM UTC-6, wrote:
From what I've observed, shared ownership of gliders in the US has been rather rare, though it is a bit more common in my club today than it's been in the past 20 years. Splitting the cost and expenses four ways certainly should make several gliders attractive.


Frank Whiteley


Shared ownership was the norm when I was growing up at what is now Caesar Creek Soaring Club in the mid 1960s. Typically 2 but up to 8 partners. My dad had a partner who flew only on Sundays; we went to church so my dad flew on Saturdays and at contests. I started out with a 1/8 share of a 1-26 (one specific weekend day a month) but flew as much as I wanted because so few of my partners did.

What changed? Lifestyles. I'm not wealthy but earlier in my career I had more money than time regarding gliders so I own my glider outright. I never knew when I'd have a weekend day free and wanted to fly without having to coordinate with a partner. I fly contests and didn't want conflicts there, either.

Shared ownership is less expensive. But cost is only part of the problem. Club gliders and shared ownership gliders often sit on the ground even on good weekend soaring days. Soaring takes a lot of time and is tough on families (although we tried to make it fun for my daughters growing up, with some success). It's tough and frustrating to learn how. It's completely weather dependent so you can't plan ahead. There's a lot more ground time than flying time. Without a motorglider, you're dependent on others for launching and retrieves. You can spend hours waiting for both the former and the latter. Etc.

It's never going to be widely popular, either for participants or spectators. And I'd argue those two aren't that related anyway.

From a purely selfish perspective (the shame of it!), I just hope soaring survives long enough for me to continue enjoying it for a while longer and then sell my glider.

Chip Bearden


Chip,

Let's hope FAA privatization falls on its ass if you want access to airspace without your ADS-B toll beacon.

Thanks for your thoughts.

My involvement with US soaring wasn't until 1981 and I did have a partner in a DG-100, but I didn't sense there were a lot of partnerships in the region. Of course that was in PASCO and the clubs I visited mostly lacked a pulse. PASCO helped create the greater social environment. I had read much about the Chico Soaring Association and was looking forward to joining when I got to California, but the Casamajor brothers had run out of steam by then. The preponderance of commercial operators in the region made it easy to operate independently.

Frank Whiteley
  #113  
Old Yesterday, 08:16 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Surge
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 117
Default We need an ASW-19 rebirth for $25,000

We don't need cheaper gliders until we can fix the declining membership issue.
In my club there are plenty of 35:1 to 40:1 gliders which have been up for sale for between $6000 and $16000 and they're not selling even after being advertised for two or three years. Single Astirs, ASW-15, etc.
I picked up a old 47:1 glider with trailer (Nimbus 2), refurbished it, installed some modern instrumentation and added a Mountain High O2 system for a total cost of under $20,000. Why would I want to purchase a more expensive, newer glider with less equipment and performance?
Even decent condition ASW 20's can be had for around the $25000 mark.

Where I live there are simply not enough students completing their training so the second hand market is abundant especially with the older members heading West one-by-one. A cheap, new glider is not going to fix that problem..
  #114  
Old Yesterday, 03:23 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 26
Default We need an ASW-19 rebirth for $25,000

In my club there are plenty of 35:1 to 40:1 gliders which have been up for sale for between $6000 and $16000 and they're not selling even after being advertised for two or three years. Single Astirs, ASW-15, etc.

What is your location and is the ASW-15 still available?

 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:36 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2017 AviationBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.