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fuel subsidies for Angle Flight pilots



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 9th 05, 07:16 PM
sashley
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Default fuel subsidies for Angle Flight pilots

Angel Flight America is trying to raise $2 million to offset the cost
of fuel. Does anyone know how they propose to subsidize Angel Flight
missions? The problem, of course, is the rule regarding sharing
expenses. I suppose that if an Angel Flight pilot flies two passengers,
Angel Flight could pay two thirds of the cost on behalf of the
passengers, but the pilot would still have to pay his pro rata share.
Am I missing something here?

Stephen S. Ashley

  #2  
Old September 9th 05, 07:26 PM
Peter Duniho
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"sashley" wrote in message
oups.com...
Angel Flight America is trying to raise $2 million to offset the cost
of fuel. Does anyone know how they propose to subsidize Angel Flight
missions? The problem, of course, is the rule regarding sharing
expenses. [...]


They would operate under the same rules they always have. Reimbursement for
charitable airlift purposes is allowed for Private Pilot certificate
holders.

Personally, I think Angel Flight ought to just ask Congress. I just read
that the airlines are asking for a $600 million handout, in the form of tax
relief, to compensate for increased fuel costs. What a crock. But I'll bet
Congress gives it to them anyway.

If commercial airlines, who can easily just pass the true cost of operation
to consumers, can get money then it seems to me that a charitable
organization like Angel Flight should have no trouble doing so. Of course,
that's not how Congress works...but it ought to be.

Pete


  #3  
Old September 9th 05, 07:56 PM
Blanche Cohen
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Angel Flight America and the individual Angel Flight regional
organizations are 501(c)3 under US Tax Code. I have a copy of the
IRS determination letter for Angel Flight West (needed it last year
to negotiate some contracts).

  #4  
Old September 9th 05, 08:33 PM
Jim Burns
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Angel Flights do not have to meet all the requirements of 61.113 relating to
pilot compensation as per:
FAA Order 8400.10, Vol 4, Chap. 5, Sect. 1, Para 1345 12/20/94
1345. FAA Policy Regarding "Compensation or Hire" Considerations

FOR CHARITABLE FLIGHTS OR LIFE FLIGHTS: Various organizations and pilots are
conducting flights that are characterized as "volunteer," "charity," or
"humanitarian." These flights are referred to by numerous generic names,
including "lifeline flights," "life flights," "mercy flights," and "angel
flights." These types of flights will be referred to as "life flights" in
this section.

A. Purposes for Life Flights. The types of organizations and pilots involved
with or conducting life flights vary greatly. The most common purpose of
life flights is to transport ill or injured persons who cannot financially
afford commercial transport to appropriate medical treatment facilities, or
to transport blood or human organs. Other "compassionate flights" include
transporting a child to visit with a dying relative, or transporting a dying
patient to return to the city of the patient's birth.

B. FAA Policy. The FAA's policy supports "truly humanitarian efforts" to
provide life flights to needy persons (including "compassionate flights").
This also includes flights involving the transfer of blood and human organs.
Since Congress has specifically provided for the tax deductibility of some
costs of charitable acts, the FAA will not treat charitable deductions of
such costs, standing alone, as constituting "compensation or hire" for the
purpose of enforcement of FAR 61.118 or FAR Part 135. Inspectors should not
treat the tax deductibility of costs as constituting "compensation or hire"
when the flights are conducted for humanitarian purposes.



  #5  
Old September 9th 05, 09:18 PM
sashley
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As I read it, all that the quoted order says is that if I deduct from
my income tax as a charitable contribution the cost I incurred in
carrying out an Angel Flight, that deduction does not constitute
"compensation." It does not say that Angel Flight's REIMBURSEMENT of my
costs does not constitute "compensation."

  #6  
Old September 9th 05, 09:38 PM
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Peter Duniho wrote:

If commercial airlines, who can easily just pass the true cost of operation
to consumers,


If the airlines could easily pass on the true cost of operation there
wouldn't be so many in or on the verge of declaring bankruptcy.

-cwk.

  #7  
Old September 9th 05, 09:43 PM
Jim Burns
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I don't see anywhere that Angel Flight is going to reimburse any pilot for
anything. They are asking for money to buy fuel. Will they donate that
fuel to the pilots that require it to complete Angel Flight missions? or
will they charge? If they donate the fuel for a flight, is the pilot's
operating expense for that flight simply reduced because he doesn't have to
purchase fuel? And because his normal expenses were reduced by an outside
source (not the passenger) could that normal cost reduction be construed as
recieveing compensation? I would assume that if the fuel is donated to the
pilot, then the pilot would have to reduce his charitable contribution
amount to cover only non fuel expenses for that specific flight.

Jim


  #8  
Old September 9th 05, 09:45 PM
Robert M. Gary
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Civil Air Patrol allows reimb. for expenses. Their requirement is that
you cannot log the time unless you have your commerical. They have a
specific FAA waver though. (we have one for Angel Flight too but it
doesn't cover this)

  #9  
Old September 9th 05, 10:56 PM
Peter Duniho
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wrote in message
oups.com...
If the airlines could easily pass on the true cost of operation there
wouldn't be so many in or on the verge of declaring bankruptcy.


If the airlines would go bankrupt passing on the true cost of operation,
they don't deserve to be in business.

Conversely, if we as a society feel that airlines serve an important enough
part of our transportation infrastructure to justify government subsidies,
then the government ought to be regulating them as well (prices, I mean, and
other aspects of operation beyond what the FAA already does).

Pete


  #10  
Old September 9th 05, 11:03 PM
Peter Duniho
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"T o d d P a t t i s t" wrote in message
...
I presume that you'[re talking about 61.113 (d), but that
requires that the "passengers make a donation to the
organization" Does Angel Flight collect the money, give it
to the passengers, and have them give it to the pilot? Do
they also meet all the other 7 requirements, day VFR, etc.?


Teach me to answer an esoteric question like that without actually reviewing
the regulation.

I don't see anything that allows a Private Pilot to be reimbursed for
charitable operations, except search & rescue. The regulation simply allows
the Private Pilot to offer their services in what otherwise might be
considered a "holding out" situation.

Still, I think the core of my answer was still correct. Inasmuch as Angel
Flight has any sort of arrangement now that allows the pilots to be
reimbursed (and it's not clear to me how they could, except for Commercial
Pilot certificate holders), I don't see how raising money to help fund that
reimbursement would be a problem.

Though, on second thought: if they use the funds raised to subsidize fuel
sales somewhere, or to buy fuel in bulk, or otherwise reduce fuel costs
without directly contributing to the pilot's bank account, I think they
could be okay, even with Private Pilot certificate holders.

Pete


 




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