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By non-poster request: "Foo fighters"



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 22nd 07, 11:32 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Gatt
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Posts: 179
Default By non-poster request: "Foo fighters"


Overheard the telecom guys chatter today about "foo fighters" and how "back
in the day" pilots used to report them all the time, etc. I mentioned that
I'd never seen anything strange or met anybody who claimed to have, but I've
only been flying since '91. So, by request, I'm passing the question on to
the forum:

"Have you ever seen..."?

They're more interested in upper atmospheric phenomenon, etc, than spacemen.

-c
( It was either ask on their behalf or tell them where the forum was so they
could come ask themselves. )


  #2  
Old October 22nd 07, 11:48 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Bertie the Bunyip[_19_]
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Posts: 3,851
Default By non-poster request: "Foo fighters"

"Gatt" wrote in
:


Overheard the telecom guys chatter today about "foo fighters" and how
"back in the day" pilots used to report them all the time, etc. I
mentioned that I'd never seen anything strange or met anybody who
claimed to have, but I've only been flying since '91. So, by
request, I'm passing the question on to the forum:

"Have you ever seen..."?

They're more interested in upper atmospheric phenomenon, etc, than
spacemen.

-c



Yeah, I saw one, it turned out to be one of those mylar balloons they sell
at fairs and malls. It's behaviourm, in the few seconds the "encounter"
lasted, was very like descripions of ufo's I'd read, i.e. it seemed almost
motionless and parraleling my course, then suddenly turned towards me at an
extremely high speed and flew under me.
Of course it was just floating there and i just flew over it.


There has been some serious looking into about the foo fighter thing during
the second world war. it is known the germans were into experiments that
were very black and that operation paper clip gathered up whatever thye
were. One of the sites they were doing this stuff was in th eSkoda works
outside Prague and at a site in Poland that still exists. Whether they flew
anything is anyone's guess.

BTW, the foo fighter name came from Smokey Stover...



Bertie
  #3  
Old October 23rd 07, 01:36 AM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Larry Dighera
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Posts: 3,953
Default By non-poster request: "Foo fighters"

On Mon, 22 Oct 2007 22:48:59 +0000 (UTC), Bertie the Bunyip
wrote in :

BTW, the foo fighter name came from Smokey Stover...


Scram Gravy Ain't Wavy:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foo_fighter
The term foo fighter was used by Allied aircraft pilots in World
War II to describe various UFOs or mysterious aerial phenomena
seen in the skies over Europe and the Pacific theatre.
Contemporary witnesses often assumed that the foo fighters were
secret weapons employed by the enemy, and it was not until after
the war that it was discovered neither side had anything to do
with them. Despite these fears, foo fighters (whatever they might
have been) were apparently never reported to have harmed or tried
to harm anyone. To this day the case remains unexplained.

Though usually thought of as blobs of light or fire, several
different types of reported phenomena were classified as "foo
fighters".

Contents
1 Etymology
2 History
3 Explanations and theories
4 Foo Fighters in fiction
5 References
6 External links

Etymology
"Foo fighter" was supposedly used initially as a semi-derogatory
reference to Japanese fighter pilots (known for erratic flying and
extreme maneuvering), but it became a catch-all term for fast
moving, erratically flying objects. There were several other terms
used to describe these objects, such as "Kraut fireballs", but
"foo fighter" seems to have been the most popular.

The term is generally thought to have been borrowed from the often
surrealist comic strip Smokey Stover. Smokey, a firefighter, was
fond of saying, "Where there's foo there's fire." (This "foo" may
have come from feu, the French word for "fire", or Feuer the
German word for "fire", or from Smokey's pronunciation of the word
"fuel".) A Big Little Book titled Smokey Stover the Foo Fighter
was published in 1938. Foo may alternatively have come from either
of the French words "faux" meaning "fake", or "fou," "mad." ...


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smokey_Stover
Smokey Stover was a comic strip written and drawn by Bill Holman
from March 10, 1935 until he retired in 1973. It was distributed
through the Chicago Tribune and was the longest lasting of the
comic strips of the "screwball comedy" genre.

The strip featured Smokey the firefighter, in his two-wheeled fire
truck called "The Foomobile", fire chief Cash U. Nutt, his wife
Cookie, with her question-mark pompadour, and his son Earl. Odd
bits of philosophy, and recurrent signs carrying bizarre phrases
such as "Notary Sojac" and "1506 Nix Nix" were featured in the
strip. (Holman described the phrase "Notary Sojac" as Gaelic for
"horsecrap" and as Gaelic for "Merry Christmas". [1]) Holman also
wrote and drew a companion strip about Smokey's cat, Spooky, who
had a perpetually bandaged tail.

"Foo" was one of these recurring nonsense words and was taken up
by World War II's "Foo Fighters". Foo may have been inspired by
the French word for fire, feu, but Holman never gave a straight
answer as to the origin. Smokey Stover wore a hat with a hole in
its hinged bill. He sometimes used the hole in the bill to hold
his (burning) cigar.

While no clear connection has ever been asserted, Holman's term
"Smokey Stover" might have been, at least in part, chosen to
remind his readers of the nearly ubiquitous stationary engine
manufactured by the Stover Manufacturing and Engine Company of
Freeport, IL which, between 1895 and 1942, made over 270,000
engines for use on America's farms. Such stationary engines were
imprecise machines which often produced substantial exhaust smoke
when fueled with kerosene, a common fuel used before catalytic
cracking of petroleum became more common in the 1930s.

http://www.smokey-stover.com/history.html
Billís most popular creation was a fireman called Smokey Stover
and his zany boss Chief Cash U Nutt. They drove to fires in their
two-wheel fire truck known as the Foo Mobile. Whatís Foo? My uncle
found this word engraved on the bottom of a jade statue in San
Franciscoís China town. The word Foo means Good-Luck. Another
phrase that was popular and used by uncle Bill was Notary Sojac
which in Gaelic means Merry Christmas and 1506 Nix Nix, which was
the hotel room number of a fellow daily news cartoonist Al Posen.


http://www.straightdope.com/mailbag/msojac.html
Actually, Holman is better remembered for "foo." Stover drove a
truck called the "Foomobile" and the word was later picked up and
used by Bob Clampett in some of his cartoon work for Warner
Brothers. There is some evidence that the phrase "foo-fighters,"
in reference to pilots investigating alleged UFOs during World War
II, can be traced back to Stover. It may have also influenced the
formation of the military acronymn "fubar" (****ed up beyond all
recognition). Back in DOS shareware days, old fogeys may remember,
"foo" and "bar" were often the default variables used by
developers to illustrate how you'd insert an argument into command
line input.


A shmoo was something entirely different:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shmoo
A shmoo (plural, shmoon) is a fictional cartoon creature, created
and first drawn by the cartoonist Al Capp in his newspaper comic
strip Li'l Abner. Their first appearance occurred on August 31,
1948. The shmoo is shaped like a plump bowling pin with legs, but
no arms. Their skin was smooth, they had no ears, but did sport
eyebrows and a sparse moustache. Their round feet were rather
short, but cartoon drawings showed them to be quite utilitarian.
They had super facial expressions, and expressed love by exuding
hearts over their heads.

The primary purpose of the character was to satirize political
debates about the supposed loss of personal incentive due to the
growth of the welfare state. According to the storyline in the
comic strip, the leaders of government and big business spent
great amounts of energy trying to exterminate the shmoo as a
dangerous threat to civilization as we know it.
  #4  
Old October 23rd 07, 10:10 AM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Bertie the Bunyip[_19_]
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Posts: 3,851
Default By non-poster request: "Foo fighters"

Larry Dighera wrote in
:

On Mon, 22 Oct 2007 22:48:59 +0000 (UTC), Bertie the Bunyip
wrote in :

BTW, the foo fighter name came from Smokey Stover...


Scram Gravy Ain't Wavy:



True, so true

But I forgot to mention one thing in my previous. The aircraft of WW2
were amongst the first to be operating in large numbers at night and in
poor weather, so it's probable that most of the Foo Fighter sightings
were St Elmos fire. It can form on your airplane in many different ways
and probably accounts for a lot of the strange balls of fire seen by
them. Lennies, supercharged exhaust from other aircraft and things like
that would account for the rest.
Like my encounter with the mylar balloon, the mind tends to give a
shape, scale and range that can be waaaaay out when it doesn't have a
lot of info to go on. I thought the balloon was quite large and far away
because I thought it was miles away, so I thought initially it was
another aircraft( I could only see it because the sun was low behind me
and reflecting off it) so I was modeling it's flight path and eventual
appearance as a complete image with that notion in mind. Of course it
was only a relatively short distance in front of me and so as I
approached it at three hundred knots plus, it appeared to turn towards
me and fly underneath. Left my mind with nothing to grasp for a few
seconds before the other foot dropped and I recognised it. I had
reported traffic visually to ATC just before it flew towards me! I
ignored their pleas for a description of the aircraft as the silver disc
flew underneath, though....


Bertie

  #5  
Old October 23rd 07, 03:08 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Gatt
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 179
Default By non-poster request: "Foo fighters"


"Bertie the Bunyip" wrote in message
.. .
Larry Dighera wrote in
:


I had reported traffic visually to ATC just before it flew towards me! I
ignored their pleas for a description of the aircraft as the silver disc
flew underneath, though....


Heh. The Coast to Coast AM types could chalk it up as another example of a
pilot not wanting to make a report for fear of ridicule. ;

-c


  #6  
Old October 23rd 07, 03:23 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Darkwing
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 604
Default By non-poster request: "Foo fighters"


"Gatt" wrote in message
...

Overheard the telecom guys chatter today about "foo fighters" and how
"back in the day" pilots used to report them all the time, etc. I
mentioned that I'd never seen anything strange or met anybody who claimed
to have, but I've only been flying since '91. So, by request, I'm
passing the question on to the forum:

"Have you ever seen..."?

They're more interested in upper atmospheric phenomenon, etc, than
spacemen.

-c
( It was either ask on their behalf or tell them where the forum was so
they could come ask themselves. )


I almost hit a green party balloon at about 3,500 ft one day in a 172,
scared the **** out of me!

----------------------------------
DW


  #7  
Old October 23rd 07, 03:33 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Bertie the Bunyip[_19_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,851
Default By non-poster request: "Foo fighters"

"Gatt" wrote in
:


"Bertie the Bunyip" wrote in message
.. .
Larry Dighera wrote in
:


I had reported traffic visually to ATC just before it flew towards
me! I ignored their pleas for a description of the aircraft as the
silver disc flew underneath, though....


Heh. The Coast to Coast AM types could chalk it up as another example
of a pilot not wanting to make a report for fear of ridicule. ;



And they would be correct


Bertie
  #8  
Old October 23rd 07, 04:33 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Frank Barchi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 22
Default By non-poster request: "Foo fighters"


"Darkwing" theducksmail"AT"yahoo.com wrote in message
...

"Gatt" wrote in message
...

Overheard the telecom guys chatter today about "foo fighters" and how
"back in the day" pilots used to report them all the time, etc. I
mentioned that I'd never seen anything strange or met anybody who claimed
to have, but I've only been flying since '91. So, by request, I'm
passing the question on to the forum:

"Have you ever seen..."?

They're more interested in upper atmospheric phenomenon, etc, than
spacemen.

-c
( It was either ask on their behalf or tell them where the forum was so
they could come ask themselves. )


I almost hit a green party balloon at about 3,500 ft one day in a 172,
scared the **** out of me!

----------------------------------
DW

I've shredded many a balloon while towing banners in a cub.
Great fun, dontcha know.

Frank


  #9  
Old October 23rd 07, 06:05 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Kloudy via AviationKB.com
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 376
Default By non-poster request: "Foo fighters"

Darkwing wrote:

I almost hit a green party balloon at about 3,500 ft one day in a 172,
scared the **** out of me!

----------------------------------
DW


I once spent about 20 minutes trying to pop a pink ballon with my glider.
It was interersting to learn how difficult it is to make two paths converge
in a turbulent sky.

Little bit later I formed up on the wing of a beautiful, vintage Cessna 140.
All shiny silver and all.

Was a fun and memorable day. Come to think of it near 25 years ago but still
clear as the sunny day it was.

--
Message posted via http://www.aviationkb.com

  #10  
Old October 23rd 07, 11:37 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Larry Dighera
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,953
Default By non-poster request: "Foo fighters"

On Tue, 23 Oct 2007 15:33:11 GMT, "Frank Barchi"
wrote in
:

I've shredded many a balloon while towing banners in a cub.
Great fun, dontcha know.


Yeah, until it blankets the combustion air intake or blocks a cooling
air intake.
 




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