A aviation & planes forum. AviationBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » AviationBanter forum » rec.aviation newsgroups » Piloting
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Get a ferry permit, or just fly it?



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old November 27th 06, 10:00 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Jim Burns[_1_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 329
Default Get a ferry permit, or just fly it?

As long as there is no hypothetical structural damage, I'd have a
hypothetical pilot, unknown to you, hypothetically fly it to your A&P's shop
and it would hypothetically show up on their ramp one morning all by itself.
For all you know, they hypothetically taxied it all the way.

(Is the wing tip with the nav light easily removeable? Could you pull the
tip off and deliver it to your shop for repair then have a local A&P install
it?)
Jim

"Paul Tomblin" wrote in message
...
If you've got a small problem with your plane, do you bother with a ferry
permit, or do you just fly it if you think it's safe?

Hypothetical: Say your (shared) plane has gotten some damage, say for
instance a wingtip strobe/nav light assembly got scraped off against a
hangar while it was being towed. Say that the wires are secured with duct
tape and the person who did the damage flew it home like that. Also say
that the company that does the work on your plane isn't at your home
airport. Would you wait for a good VFR day and fly it over to that
company, or would you go through all the hassle of getting a local
mechanic to inspect it and apply for a ferry permit?

--
Paul Tomblin http://blog.xcski.com/
"I have a step-ladder. It's a very nice ladder and all, but I wish I had
the chance to get to know my real ladder." - Paula Poundstone



Ads
  #12  
Old November 27th 06, 11:42 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,130
Default Get a ferry permit, or just fly it?


Robert M. Gary wrote:


I would imagine that ferry permits were created to protect
people from themselves.


My bet is that the permits were created as a legal loophole so the FSDO
couldn't strand your plane in some remote area that wasn't capable of
performing the required maintenance. Once the FAA uses the
"unairworthy" word a pilot is otherwise stuck. Those of us who have
done some bush flying have had situations where we've needed to fly
"unairworthy" planes out of remote areas. I've had insurance companies
pay me to fly planes that have had illegal field repairs (although done
by licensed IA's) that would have required major alteration 337's to
otherwise fly out of very remote areas (or countries), especially when
flight controls have been damaged and repaired.

-Robert


In Canada the ferry permit must be signed by a mechanic who has
inspected the airplane and certified it "safe and fit for flight,"
which means it's safe enough but not in compliance with its type
certificate and therefore not airworthy. In most cases only essential
flight crew may be carried.

Dan

  #13  
Old November 28th 06, 12:02 AM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,130
Default Get a ferry permit, or just fly it?


Newps wrote:
Robert M. Gary wrote:



My bet is that the permits were created as a legal loophole so the FSDO
couldn't strand your plane in some remote area that wasn't capable of
performing the required maintenance. Once the FAA uses the
"unairworthy" word a pilot is otherwise stuck. Those of us who have
done some bush flying have had situations where we've needed to fly
"unairworthy" planes out of remote areas.


Absolutely. And some of us just don't care. Helped a buddy who taxiied
his Cub into a hole that bent one of the prop blades. We used a 5 pound
mallet and a wooden wheel chock to pound it more or less back into shape
so he could fly it the 30 miles back home. He said it vibrated pretty
good on the way back home but who cares?


He would have, if the crank had busted or he'd lost part of that
prop blade. Blades often crack when bent beyond certain angles-per-unit
of blade span, and a cracked blade will often let go and leave the rest
so unbalanced that the whole engine is torn from the airplane. CG moves
way aft and it won't even glide. It has happened. Propeller bolts are
known to crack, as well.
And you *would* have cared, too, trying to explain to his
widow and kids what you guys had been up to.
I once had a crank break. In flight. There'd been a
propstrike sometime in the distant past (old engine) and the crack that
resulted finally made itself known. Same sort of engine as in your
friend's old Cub. The crank tends to crack between the #1 and #2
throws. I have a picture of the front end of an O-520 crank that had
been propstruck. Came right out of the engine some time after the
strike.
These days most insurance companies, engine manufacturers and
even some governments want the engine torn down after a propstrike due
to the high incidence of engine failure following such an event. I just
heard the other day of an engine that failed 100 hours after a strike,
and after the gyppo shop missed the crack in the crank and put the
engine back together.
During a propstrike, some Lycomings are known to spit loose the
camshaft drive gear retaining bolt in the back of the crank, eventually
letting the gear get away. An engine doesn't run too well without the
cam turning. See:

http://www.airweb.faa.gov/Regulatory...5?OpenDocument

Some shops find bent or cracked con rods, pistons, cranks and/or cases.
The shock of a prop striking something firm is transmitted directly to
the engine, unlike an automobile that has tires and a drivetrain to
twist and absorb it.

Dan

  #14  
Old November 28th 06, 12:17 AM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Jim Macklin
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,070
Default Get a ferry permit, or just fly it?

Same in USA. In fact that is one of the prime uses I made
of my A&P. Go get a damaged airplane and inspect and sign
off the permit.

It is a good idea to check with the insurance company to be
sure that the insurance is valid because a "ferry permit" is
a good idea.

21.197 Special flight permits.
(a) A special flight permit may be issued for an aircraft
that may not currently meet applicable airworthiness
requirements but is capable of safe flight, for the
following purposes:

(1) Flying the aircraft to a base where repairs,
alterations, or maintenance are to be performed, or to a
point of storage.

(2) Delivering or exporting the aircraft.

(3) Production flight testing new production aircraft.

(4) Evacuating aircraft from areas of impending danger.

(5) Conducting customer demonstration flights in new
production aircraft that have satisfactorily completed
production flight tests.

(b) A special flight permit may also be issued to authorize
the operation of an aircraft at a weight in excess of its
maximum certificated takeoff weight for flight beyond the
normal range over water, or over land areas where adequate
landing facilities or appropriate fuel is not available. The
excess weight that may be authorized under this paragraph is
limited to the additional fuel, fuel-carrying facilities,
and navigation equipment necessary for the flight.

(c) Upon application, as prescribed in 119.51 or 91.1017
of this chapter, a special flight permit with a continuing
authorization may be issued for aircraft that may not meet
applicable airworthiness requirements but are capable of
safe flight for the purpose of flying aircraft to a base
where maintenance or alterations are to be performed. The
permit issued under this paragraph is an authorization,
including conditions and limitations for flight, which is
set forth in the certificate holder's operations
specifications. The permit issued under this paragraph may
be issued to-

(1) Certificate holders authorized to conduct operations
under Part 121 of this chapter; or

(2) Certificate holders authorized to conduct operations
under Part 135 for those aircraft they operate and maintain
under a continuous airworthiness maintenance program
prescribed by 135.411 (a)(2) or (b) of that part.

The permit issued under this paragraph is an authorization,
including any conditions and limitations for flight, which
is set forth in the certificate holder's operations
specifications.

(3) Management specification holders authorized to conduct
operations under part 91, subpart K, for those aircraft they
operate and maintain under a continuous airworthiness
maintenance program prescribed by 91.1411 of this part.

[Doc. No. 5085, 29 FR 14570, Oct. 24, 1964, as amended by
Amdt. 21-21, 33 FR 6859, May 7, 1968; Amdt. 21-51, 45 FR
60170, Sept. 11, 1980; Amdt. 21-54, 46 FR 37878, July 23,
1981; Amdt. 21-79, 66 FR 21066, Apr. 27, 2001; Amdt. 21-84,
68 FR 54559, Sept. 17, 2003; Amdt. 21-87, 71 FR 536,



Home Page Executive Branch Code of Federal Regulations
Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations (e-CFR)
BETA TEST SITE
e-CFR Data is current as of November 23, 2006




Title 14: Aeronautics and Space
PART 21-CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS
Subpart H-Airworthiness Certificates


Browse Previous


21.199 Issue of special flight permits.
(a) Except as provided in 21.197(c), an applicant for a
special flight permit must submit a statement in a form and
manner prescribed by the Administrator, indicating-

(1) The purpose of the flight.

(2) The proposed itinerary.

(3) The crew required to operate the aircraft and its
equipment, e.g., pilot, co-pilot, navigator, etc.

(4) The ways, if any, in which the aircraft does not comply
with the applicable airworthiness requirements.

(5) Any restriction the applicant considers necessary for
safe operation of the aircraft.

(6) Any other information considered necessary by the
Administrator for the purpose of prescribing operating
limitations.

(b) The Administrator may make, or require the applicant to
make appropriate inspections or tests necessary for safety.

[Doc. No. 5085, 29 FR 14570, Oct. 24, 1964, as amended by
Amdt. 21-21, 33 FR 6859, May 7, 1968; Amdt. 21-22, 33 FR
11901, Aug. 22, 1968]

wrote in message
ups.com...
|
| Robert M. Gary wrote:
|
|
| I would imagine that ferry permits were
created to protect
| people from themselves.
|
| My bet is that the permits were created as a legal
loophole so the FSDO
| couldn't strand your plane in some remote area that
wasn't capable of
| performing the required maintenance. Once the FAA uses
the
| "unairworthy" word a pilot is otherwise stuck. Those of
us who have
| done some bush flying have had situations where we've
needed to fly
| "unairworthy" planes out of remote areas. I've had
insurance companies
| pay me to fly planes that have had illegal field repairs
(although done
| by licensed IA's) that would have required major
alteration 337's to
| otherwise fly out of very remote areas (or countries),
especially when
| flight controls have been damaged and repaired.
|
| -Robert
|
| In Canada the ferry permit must be signed by a
mechanic who has
| inspected the airplane and certified it "safe and fit for
flight,"
| which means it's safe enough but not in compliance with
its type
| certificate and therefore not airworthy. In most cases
only essential
| flight crew may be carried.
|
| Dan
|


  #16  
Old November 28th 06, 01:39 AM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Morgans[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,923
Default Get a ferry permit, or just fly it?


"john smith" wrote

Wingtip strobe is not a structural part and is not required for day VFR
flight. No structural damage so safety of flight is not an issue.


I thought that violated something about not having anything attached to the
exterior of the aircraft that was not originally there, or attached in a manner
that it was not originally attached. Duct tape is not how it was in original
condition.

I think that is the same bit that they can get you on for flying with, say, an
exterior camera tapped to a strut brace, or something like that.

Or am I imagining something I heard again? g I can never tell. :-)
--
Jim in NC

  #17  
Old November 28th 06, 03:02 AM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
BT
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 995
Default Get a ferry permit, or just fly it?

taking off maintenace inspection panels during a standard preflight?

Sorry boss, that step is not in the manufacturer's FAA APPROVED check list.

just how many stripped screw heads will the mechnics be replacing.

BT

"Robert M. Gary" wrote in message
oups.com...

Newps wrote:
Paul Tomblin wrote:

If you've got a small problem with your plane, do you bother with a
ferry
permit, or do you just fly it if you think it's safe?


Fly it.


I agree. Interestingly, I was involve in an FAA "altercation" a little
while back. The C-182 that the FBO rents out got an onsite inspection
by the FSDO and failed. All of us CFIs who taught in the plane got
called to the carpet for not taknig off inspection covers before flight
(or something stupid like that). Interestingly though a few pilot who
also happen to be FAA ATC's didn't get called at all. Seems like the
FAA takes care of their own??

-Robert



  #18  
Old November 28th 06, 04:14 AM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Judah
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 936
Default Get a ferry permit, or just fly it?

"Robert M. Gary" wrote in
oups.com:

I agree. Interestingly, I was involve in an FAA "altercation" a little
while back. The C-182 that the FBO rents out got an onsite inspection
by the FSDO and failed. All of us CFIs who taught in the plane got
called to the carpet for not taknig off inspection covers before flight
(or something stupid like that). Interestingly though a few pilot who
also happen to be FAA ATC's didn't get called at all. Seems like the
FAA takes care of their own??


I don't know all of the details in this case, so I'll just throw out some
general concepts that were relayed to me recently by a fellow pilot who
spent some time at the local FSDO. He said that the FAA holds higher
expectations for CFIs with respect to regulatory infractions. Basically,
CFIs represent the FAA to their student pilots every day. It is their
responsibility to accurately teach pilots the rules that the pilots are
supposed to follow to ensure safe flight.

It is ultimately the Pilot's responsibility to ensure safety of flight, and
it is ultimately the pilot's responsibility to ensure the plane he is
commanding is airworthy. However, when a pilot is renting a plane from an
FBO, he is typically not given free access to maintenance Logbooks, and has
to trust that the FBO is properly maintaining the planes.

If the FAA finds out that the plane has not been properly maintained, they
are obviously going to take action to ensure that the problem gets
corrected. In reality, all the pilots who flew it in that condition may
have violated FAA regulations. However, as a CFI, you are not only supposed
to know how to determine if the plane was safe, you are also supposed to be
training pilots how to do the same. If, after being chastised by the FAA,
you STILL don't know what the problem was, or how to have detected it, I
would be concerned that you do not take seriously your RESPONSIBILITY as a
CFI to both your students and to the FAA.

What if the problem had caused fatalities? What if the problem could have
easily been detected, and your student missed it because you never taught
him that it is his responsibility to check for it, or even how to check for
it? Don't you think that CFIs SHOULD be held to a higher standard than
pilots?

Whether your students work for ATC or McDonalds is irrelevant - ATC is not
responsible for teaching pilots how to fly safely. CFIs are.

  #19  
Old November 28th 06, 07:16 AM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
PilotWeb.org
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10
Default Get a ferry permit, or just fly it?

First, just follow the FAR's there is a section on airworthiness,
follow the following sequence of questions...

1. Is the inop equipment required by 91.105? (VFR required equipment)
2. Is it required by some AD? (Airworthiness directive)
3. Is it required in the POH as required equipment?
4. Was is required for aircraft certification?
5. Is it or not on a minimum equipment list? (Most private AC dont
have this)


If you fly with it INOP, make sure it is, placarded INOP, disconnected,
removed, and/or deactivated.

 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
radio permit for german registered glider Andy Smielkiewicz Soaring 6 February 24th 06 01:27 PM
F4U-5 ferry range [email protected] Naval Aviation 2 January 31st 06 04:02 AM
An EAC ferry to Red Flag Maurice Hendriks Naval Aviation 0 September 11th 05 11:04 PM
Mexico Multi-Entry Permit [email protected] Piloting 3 August 26th 05 05:12 AM
Ferry Permit? Mackfly Soaring 7 March 9th 04 02:23 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:01 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2014 AviationBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.