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Passenger Comfort.....



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 25th 05, 01:08 AM
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Default Passenger Comfort.....

I'm a relatively new commercial pilot and have had several passengers
with NPE...near puke events! Some have been uncomfortable from the
moment we start the tow, others at altitude and others while
thermaling. I keep the chatter going, recommend steady breathing and
to look at the horizon. I make sure the air vent is open as well.

Can anyone offer some tips to keep the passengers from losing it? I
want each one to have a great ride and first gliding experience. I
keep the manuevers gentle and frequently ask how they are doing.

It seems the ones who say they will be fine, and laugh at me when I
point out the airsick bag, have been the one's to get queasy.

Thanks in advance,

Douglas

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  #2  
Old July 25th 05, 01:42 AM
Paul
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Why try letting them fly the glider.
This I find distracts them and they end up thinking about other things
rather than puking.
Also make sure they are looking out at the horizon and admiring the view.
Some people put their heads down and look inside when they start to feel off
and this just makes it worse.
Paul
wrote in message
ups.com...
I'm a relatively new commercial pilot and have had several passengers
with NPE...near puke events! Some have been uncomfortable from the
moment we start the tow, others at altitude and others while
thermaling. I keep the chatter going, recommend steady breathing and
to look at the horizon. I make sure the air vent is open as well.

Can anyone offer some tips to keep the passengers from losing it? I
want each one to have a great ride and first gliding experience. I
keep the manuevers gentle and frequently ask how they are doing.

It seems the ones who say they will be fine, and laugh at me when I
point out the airsick bag, have been the one's to get queasy.

Thanks in advance,

Douglas



  #3  
Old July 25th 05, 03:48 AM
Jack
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Paul wrote:

Why try letting them fly the glider.


I assume you meant, "why not...?"


Also make sure they are looking out at the horizon and admiring the view.
Some people put their heads down and look inside when they start to feel off
and this just makes it worse.


Good advice here.


It seems the ones who say they will be fine, and laugh at me when I
point out the airsick bag, have been the one's to get queasy.


Don't discount the power of suggestion -- but I'm not sure how to get around
it without leaving them uninformed.


Jack
  #4  
Old July 25th 05, 03:50 AM
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I wrote an article about "Give a Better Glider Ride" in the April 2004
issue of "Soaring" magazine, that was well received.

Here's a few tips: Consider not making the glider ride into a soaring
flight. Five shallow turns in a thermal at most - then work "lift
streets". The initial glider ride should be about 15-20 minutes, and
in the cool, calm air of the morning. Constant turning under a bit of
"G" and seeing the world go 'round every 20 seconds may not be a happy
introduction to the joy of soaring. If they liked the short flight,
then take them up again for the soaring flight, later in the day.

Of course, if you are not flying coordinated, you are making them
uncomfortable, and if you are talking too much - trying to explain the
concepts of the yaw string, glider aerodynamics, thermals, etc. to them
- then you are not allowing them to enjoy the quiet, and make their own
adjustments to the new sensations.

In 38 years of giving thousands of glider rides, I've made less than 10
passengers sick. Think about how new it must be to your passenger in
every sensory aspect. Give them time to adjust and they will be back
for more.

If you are not an instructor, I'd be careful about having them fly the
glider. (Just the stick, as the rudder is more than they need to know
about at first. Read Derek Piggott's chapter for instructors in his
book, "Gliding Safety" and how to teach turns.) 'Telling passengers
where to look - out at the horizon is OK, as long as the rate of turn
is slow.

You are to be commended for wanting to share soaring with your
passengers, but consider sharing it a small piece at a time. Too much
candy makes one sick!

Try to look up that article in April 2004 "Soaring", or I can email it
as a file.

Burt Compton
Marfa Gliders, west Texas USA
www.flygliders.com

  #5  
Old July 25th 05, 05:28 AM
JC
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On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 02:48:58 GMT, Jack wrote:

Paul wrote:

snip

It seems the ones who say they will be fine, and laugh at me when I
point out the airsick bag, have been the one's to get queasy.


Don't discount the power of suggestion -- but I'm not sure how to get around
it without leaving them uninformed.


Jack


I used to operate a commercial glider operation. I kept a gallon size
zip lock bag in the front seat pocket but I never told the passenger
about it. I would then watch the passenger for signs of there getting
sick. (I was in the back seat.) If they started sweating a lot on
not such a hot day, or became uresponsive when questioned I would
directly ask them if they were not feeling well and tell them where
the bag was.

I did not tell them about the bag before launch because a discussion
between many commercial operators suggested that telling them where
the sick sac was would often times make passengers more prone to
getting sick.

I also avoided giving rides when it was extremely hot or when the
visibility was poor, i.e. no clear horizon. With no clear horizon I
found passengers had more of a problem.

In five seasons of giving rides commercially and 7 seasons of giving
rides for my club, I only had three or four people get sick.
Unfortunately one of them was my former fiancee.


(The gallon bag was so they would not have any trouble with aim.
They also could seal it after they were done and I did not have to
smell.)

  #6  
Old July 25th 05, 01:58 PM
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Thanks all for the tips. I'll look up your article Burt. After
reading the replies, I think my biggest mistake has been the power of
suggestion. I've made too much of a point about the airsick bag, and
probably have been questioning the passengers to frequently to see if
they are OK. I'll switch to the "hidden" gallon zip locks, and won't
mention it unless it's needed. I've been having them look at the
horizon which seems to have helped. I really do keep it mellow unless
they say they are OK with the turns. I'll also keep my mouth shut
more! But I still will point out the sights....on a good day, the
passengers can see NY, Phillie, and the ocean.

Thanks again for all the replies and tips. I take giving rides very
seriously, if we can give a "newbie" a good experience the first time
out, they may come back for more.

Douglas

  #7  
Old July 25th 05, 04:08 PM
Bruno
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Default

I work in the boating business and ran across the following miracle
cure at the Miami boat show 2 years ago. I don't sell the stuff so my
recommendation has no side motives.

It is a liquid you put behind your ears called MotionEaze. I was
extremely skeptical when I first saw it but for 15 bucks thought it was
worth a try. Why take a passenger up soaring if all you do is go
straight and gentle so you don't make them sick? Without the worry of
getting them sick, you can really help them to experience what many of
us take for granted when we soar. I bought the stuff and tried it for
the first time on a cruise last year. My mother-in-law was full blown
green and puking the first night from the rocking ship. I thought she
would make a good guinea pig. To stuff really worked on her and
she was 100% better 10 minutes after trying it. I tried it on another
5 or so people during the cruise and on dive boats and every time it
worked even after they were feeling sick and/or puking. I now give it
to every person I take up soaring before we take off and haven't had a
sick one yet even after aggressive thermal ling.

Again, I am not involved with this company in any way, just a very
happy customer. Their website is http://www.motioneaze.com/

Bruno

  #8  
Old July 25th 05, 05:20 PM
Bruce
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Default

One thing I have learned - Make sure your passengers - Never look at the wingtip
circling close to the ground. The apparent retrograde motion seems to trigger
motion sickness very reliably in those who are succeptible.

We also make as little point of the air-sick bag as possible, and just enloy the
flight. If the passenger is enjoying the flight we might extend it, but
generally keep first flight to 20 minutes max.

Some folk never get comfortable. So far I have never made a passenger more than
queasy. There are those who have made someone throw up, and those who will some
day make someone throw up...

JC wrote:
On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 02:48:58 GMT, Jack wrote:


Paul wrote:


snip

It seems the ones who say they will be fine, and laugh at me when I
point out the airsick bag, have been the one's to get queasy.


Don't discount the power of suggestion -- but I'm not sure how to get around
it without leaving them uninformed.


Jack



I used to operate a commercial glider operation. I kept a gallon size
zip lock bag in the front seat pocket but I never told the passenger
about it. I would then watch the passenger for signs of there getting
sick. (I was in the back seat.) If they started sweating a lot on
not such a hot day, or became uresponsive when questioned I would
directly ask them if they were not feeling well and tell them where
the bag was.

I did not tell them about the bag before launch because a discussion
between many commercial operators suggested that telling them where
the sick sac was would often times make passengers more prone to
getting sick.

I also avoided giving rides when it was extremely hot or when the
visibility was poor, i.e. no clear horizon. With no clear horizon I
found passengers had more of a problem.

In five seasons of giving rides commercially and 7 seasons of giving
rides for my club, I only had three or four people get sick.
Unfortunately one of them was my former fiancee.


(The gallon bag was so they would not have any trouble with aim.
They also could seal it after they were done and I did not have to
smell.)



--
Bruce Greeff
Std Cirrus #57
I'm no-T at the address above.
  #9  
Old July 25th 05, 09:39 PM
dan
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Default

wrote:
I'm a relatively new commercial pilot and have had several passengers
with NPE...near puke events! Some have been uncomfortable from the
moment we start the tow, others at altitude and others while
thermaling. I keep the chatter going, recommend steady breathing and
to look at the horizon. I make sure the air vent is open as well.


Can anyone offer some tips to keep the passengers from losing it? I
want each one to have a great ride and first gliding experience. I
keep the manuevers gentle and frequently ask how they are doing.


It seems the ones who say they will be fine, and laugh at me when I
point out the airsick bag, have been the one's to get queasy.


I've never had anyone actually get sick on me while giving a ride, although
one person said she "wouldn't mind" if we landed early. I think some people
are more prone to getting sick, and typically, they know it. I agree with
the other people who say not to tell them about the barf bag until they need
it. If your passanger asks about it before they get in, thats a *BAD* sign.
Someone at my club once joked that every passanger who asked about the
barf bag on the ground had gotten sick in the air.

I think fresh air and a clear view out of the cockpit are the best way to
minimize airsickness. Never give a non-pilot a backseat ride. However,
I find that turbulent movement and reduced G's are what tend to make me
feel sick rather than being at any particular orientation. A tight bank
would have little impact on me, but the moment the ship breaks into a stall
would tend to upset me. Staying out of thermals helps, but its no garuntee,
and tows through bumpy air are probably worse than thermals. So there may
be little you can do about it.

I think having the controls (whether on an airplane, or a car or a boat)
makes a big improvement. Obviously you can't hand over the controls during
take off or landing, but you may want to consider giving them the controls
in the air.

dan
  #10  
Old July 25th 05, 11:02 PM
Stuart Grant
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Just want to put in a good word for a product called the Relief Band.
It is an FDA-approved medical device (proven effective)than can be
purchased online for about $75 and is available in many drug store
chains. It is effective for motion sickness, morning sickness, and most
other nausea. I have found it effective 85% of the time. It is worn
like a watch and gives an adjustable small electric shock to the inside
of the wrist. Get the one that has replaceable button cell batteries
(they last about 40 hours).

So when you must give a ride on a hot bumpy afternoon to a passenger
that just had a big lunch you might have them put on a relief band
before the get in the glider. Barf bag as backup.

 




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