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How high can you fly?



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 18th 10, 04:24 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Mark
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Posts: 815
Default How high can you fly?

Ok, it's the year 2016. You are in a little Cessna 150.
You're plane isn't pressurized because it will implode,
so you're wearing a pressurized body suit. You have
an oxygen mask. You plane is powered by a very
powerful brushless electric motor supplied by a 20lb
carbon nanotube source that is basically limitless.
Your powerplant is equivalent to 700hp in an LSA.
The electric motor and cabin are heated.

How high can you fly? 95,000ft?

This will soon be a real consideration.

---
Mark
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  #2  
Old September 18th 10, 05:05 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Ari Silverstein
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Posts: 190
Default How high can you fly?

On Sat, 18 Sep 2010 08:24:05 -0700 (PDT), Mark wrote:

Ok, it's the year 2016. You are in a little Cessna 150.
You're plane isn't pressurized because it will implode,
so you're wearing a pressurized body suit. You have
an oxygen mask. You plane is powered by a very
powerful brushless electric motor supplied by a 20lb
carbon nanotube source that is basically limitless.
Your powerplant is equivalent to 700hp in an LSA.
The electric motor and cabin are heated.

How high can you fly? 95,000ft?

This will soon be a real consideration.

---
Mark


*Soon? ROTFLMAO @ U.*
--
A fireside chat not with Ari!
http://tr.im/holj
Motto: Live To Spooge It!
  #3  
Old September 18th 10, 06:37 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
[email protected]csol.spam.sux.com
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,879
Default How high can you fly?

Mark wrote:
Ok, it's the year 2016. You are in a little Cessna 150.
You're plane isn't pressurized because it will implode,
so you're wearing a pressurized body suit. You have
an oxygen mask. You plane is powered by a very
powerful brushless electric motor supplied by a 20lb
carbon nanotube source that is basically limitless.
Your powerplant is equivalent to 700hp in an LSA.
The electric motor and cabin are heated.

How high can you fly? 95,000ft?


Gibberish.

Little airplanes aren't presurized because the seals to keep things like
doors and windows from leaking are heavy. A soda can can hold 100 psi.

And you bet the electric motor is heated, you will play hell keeping it
cool, even at altitude.


--
Jim Pennino

Remove .spam.sux to reply.
  #4  
Old September 18th 10, 07:21 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Mark
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 815
Default How high can you fly?

On Sep 18, 1:37*pm, wrote:
Mark wrote:
Ok, it's the year 2016. You are in a little Cessna 150.
You're plane isn't pressurized because it will implode,
so you're wearing a pressurized body suit. You have
an oxygen mask. You plane is powered by a very
powerful brushless electric motor supplied by a 20lb
carbon nanotube source that is basically limitless.
Your powerplant is equivalent to 700hp in an LSA.
The electric motor and cabin are heated.


How high can you fly? 95,000ft?


Gibberish.


Eludication: my sentence ends in a question mark. The figure
was discriminate and taken from reference to U-2 heights.
Airfoils stop working in thin density. I asked when.

Little airplanes aren't presurized because the seals to keep things like
doors and windows from leaking are heavy. A soda can can hold 100 psi.


Little planes aren't pressurized because the ones I'm proposing
aren't currently able to reach anywhere near these elevations. Given
the heights I'm proposing, the airframe will buckle if the cabin is
pressurized. Fact.

And you bet the electric motor is heated, you will play hell keeping it
cool, even at altitude.


Brushless DC motors are different from conventional ones.
Brushless aka BLDC motors, or electronically commutated
motors are synchronous electric motors which have electronic
commutation systems rather than mechanical commutators
and brushes. The current-to-torque and voltage-to-speed
relationships are linear.

They are much more highly efficient, and eliminate ionizing
sparks from the commutator. They are not subjected to
centrifugal forces and can be cooled by conduction. This
allows them to be enclosed, which, protects them from dirt
and debris.

---
Mark

--
Jim Pennino

Remove .spam.sux to reply.


  #5  
Old September 18th 10, 07:40 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Jim Logajan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,958
Default How high can you fly?

Mark wrote:
Ok, it's the year 2016. You are in a little Cessna 150.
You're plane isn't pressurized because it will implode,


Explode, not implode. Unless it is an underwater submersible?

so you're wearing a pressurized body suit. You have
an oxygen mask. You plane is powered by a very
powerful brushless electric motor supplied by a 20lb
carbon nanotube source that is basically limitless.


Your claims are absurd.

I was one of the technical reviewers for the 1999 text "Nanomedicine, Vol
I" by Robert A. Freitas Jr. One of the chapters I reviewed was Chapter 6 on
power for nanomachines. The energy density of storage devices that rely on
charge separation are limited by the dielectric strengths of materials.
They are typically one or two orders of magnitude smaller than chemical
energy storage Some references:

http://www.nanomedicine.com/NMI/6.2.3.htm
http://www.nanomedicine.com/NMI/6.2.4.htm
http://www.nanomedicine.com/NMI/Tables/6.1.jpg

Your powerplant is equivalent to 700hp in an LSA.
The electric motor and cabin are heated.


That is much too powerful to maintain a sea level speed of under 120 kts at
continuous maximum power for LSA.

How high can you fly? 95,000ft?

This will soon be a real consideration.


In 6 years? No.
  #6  
Old September 18th 10, 08:56 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Mark
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 815
Default How high can you fly?

On Sep 18, 2:40*pm, Jim Logajan wrote:
Mark wrote:
Ok, it's the year 2016. You are in a little Cessna 150.
You're plane isn't pressurized because it will implode,


Explode, not implode. Unless it is an underwater submersible?


LOL! Ok Jim, and I hate to do this, but... the self
contained brushless motor and battery system are
sealed, so, yes, you will be
able to fly you Cessna 150 underwater down to
depths of 200 fathoms, which is 1,200 ft.

Otherwise, take it too high in the air and get splodiated.


so you're wearing a pressurized body suit. You have
an oxygen mask. You plane is powered by a very
powerful brushless electric motor supplied by a 20lb
carbon nanotube source that is basically limitless.


Your claims are absurd.


And Galileo was thrown in jail.

I was one of the technical reviewers for the 1999 text "Nanomedicine, Vol
I" by Robert A. Freitas Jr. One of the chapters I reviewed was Chapter 6 on
power for nanomachines. The energy density of storage devices that rely on
charge separation are limited by the dielectric strengths of materials.
They are typically one or two orders of magnitude smaller than chemical
energy storage Some references:

http://www.nanomedicine.com/NMI/6.2....Tables/6.1.jpg


Time constraints will certainly limit me from responding here until
I've read all articles and compared. Your link seems to be about
medicine though.

Your powerplant is equivalent to 700hp in an LSA.
The electric motor and cabin are heated.


That is much too powerful to maintain a sea level speed of under 120 kts at
continuous maximum power for LSA.


Let me qualify then. 700hp in an airplane that weighs
1320lbs, was formerly limited to a stall speed of 51mph
and a continuous straight and level flight at sea level
of 138 mph, until I took the engine out and sold it on
barnstormers, then replaced it with my new brushless
electric motor and high tech battery system.

How high can you fly? 95,000ft?


This will soon be a real consideration.


In 6 years? No.


Sorry. 8.

---
Mark

  #7  
Old September 18th 10, 09:13 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Mark
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 815
Default How high can you fly?

On Sep 18, 2:40*pm, Jim Logajan wrote:
Mark wrote:
Ok, it's the year 2016. You are in a little Cessna 150.
You're plane isn't pressurized because it will implode,


Explode, not implode. Unless it is an underwater submersible?

so you're wearing a pressurized body suit. You have
an oxygen mask. You plane is powered by a very
powerful brushless electric motor supplied by a 20lb
carbon nanotube source that is basically limitless.


Your claims are absurd.


Also, current electric planes carry around a 200lb
battery pack. Actually I was thinking of multiple 20lb
batteries in series for a total of around 60lbs using
technology which is described today as viable for
production and can store much more electricity
per weight than lithium ion batteries and store it
longer.

---
Mark
  #8  
Old September 18th 10, 10:19 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,879
Default How high can you fly?

Mark wrote:
On Sep 18, 1:37*pm, wrote:
Mark wrote:
Ok, it's the year 2016. You are in a little Cessna 150.
You're plane isn't pressurized because it will implode,
so you're wearing a pressurized body suit. You have
an oxygen mask. You plane is powered by a very
powerful brushless electric motor supplied by a 20lb
carbon nanotube source that is basically limitless.
Your powerplant is equivalent to 700hp in an LSA.
The electric motor and cabin are heated.


How high can you fly? 95,000ft?


Gibberish.


Eludication: my sentence ends in a question mark. The figure
was discriminate and taken from reference to U-2 heights.
Airfoils stop working in thin density. I asked when.


I wan't talking about the last sentence; your entire post is gibberish.

Little airplanes aren't presurized because the seals to keep things like
doors and windows from leaking are heavy. A soda can can hold 100 psi.


Little planes aren't pressurized because the ones I'm proposing
aren't currently able to reach anywhere near these elevations. Given
the heights I'm proposing, the airframe will buckle if the cabin is
pressurized. Fact.


If the airplane went into space and the interior were pressurized to sea
level, the pressure diffential would be about 14 psi.

The extremely thin aluminum in a soda can holds a pressure differential
of 100 psi.

The Apollo craft were pressurized and the skin on them is so thin the
average person could punch a hole through it bare handed.

You are full of crap.

And you bet the electric motor is heated, you will play hell keeping it
cool, even at altitude.


Brushless DC motors are different from conventional ones.


All motors have loss and the loss shows up as heat.

Cooling things at altitude is a problem because even though the air is cold,
it is very thin and you have to move a lot of it.


--
Jim Pennino

Remove .spam.sux to reply.
  #9  
Old September 18th 10, 11:00 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Mark
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 815
Default How high can you fly?

On Sep 18, 5:19*pm, wrote:
Mark wrote:
On Sep 18, 1:37*pm, wrote:
Mark wrote:
Ok, it's the year 2016. You are in a little Cessna 150.
You're plane isn't pressurized because it will implode,
so you're wearing a pressurized body suit. You have
an oxygen mask. You plane is powered by a very
powerful brushless electric motor supplied by a 20lb
carbon nanotube source that is basically limitless.
Your powerplant is equivalent to 700hp in an LSA.
The electric motor and cabin are heated.


How high can you fly? 95,000ft?


Gibberish.


Eludication: my sentence ends in a question mark. The figure
was discriminate and taken from reference to U-2 heights.
Airfoils stop working in thin density. I asked when.


I wan't talking about the last sentence; your entire post is gibberish.

Little airplanes aren't presurized because the seals to keep things like
doors and windows from leaking are heavy. A soda can can hold 100 psi.


Little planes aren't pressurized because the ones I'm proposing
aren't currently able to reach anywhere near these elevations. Given
the heights I'm proposing, the airframe will buckle if the cabin is
pressurized. Fact.


If the airplane went into space and the interior were pressurized to sea
level, the pressure diffential would be about 14 psi.

The extremely thin aluminum in a soda can holds a pressure differential
of 100 psi.

The Apollo craft were pressurized and the skin on them is so thin the
average person could punch a hole through it bare handed.

You are full of crap.

And you bet the electric motor is heated, you will play hell keeping it
cool, even at altitude.


Brushless DC motors are different from conventional ones.


All motors have loss and the loss shows up as heat.

Cooling things at altitude is a problem because even though the air is cold,
it is very thin and you have to move a lot of it.

--
Jim Pennino

Remove .spam.sux to reply.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


I studied the topic of service ceilings as well as ramifications
of what can occur at this elevation. Do the same and find
out about airframe distortion, pressure loss and break-ups.
It's aviation 101, not Coke can 101. You can stand on an
upright egg collection. You can stand on a coke can. Your
anologys are laughable. Spacecraft are made different
than Cessnas.

Read for content. Air density and cooling aren't relevant
to a sealed unit.

---
Mark
  #10  
Old September 18th 10, 11:08 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,879
Default How high can you fly?

Mark wrote:
On Sep 18, 5:19*pm, wrote:
Mark wrote:
On Sep 18, 1:37*pm, wrote:
Mark wrote:
Ok, it's the year 2016. You are in a little Cessna 150.
You're plane isn't pressurized because it will implode,
so you're wearing a pressurized body suit. You have
an oxygen mask. You plane is powered by a very
powerful brushless electric motor supplied by a 20lb
carbon nanotube source that is basically limitless.
Your powerplant is equivalent to 700hp in an LSA.
The electric motor and cabin are heated.


How high can you fly? 95,000ft?


Gibberish.


Eludication: my sentence ends in a question mark. The figure
was discriminate and taken from reference to U-2 heights.
Airfoils stop working in thin density. I asked when.


I wan't talking about the last sentence; your entire post is gibberish.

Little airplanes aren't presurized because the seals to keep things like
doors and windows from leaking are heavy. A soda can can hold 100 psi.


Little planes aren't pressurized because the ones I'm proposing
aren't currently able to reach anywhere near these elevations. Given
the heights I'm proposing, the airframe will buckle if the cabin is
pressurized. Fact.


If the airplane went into space and the interior were pressurized to sea
level, the pressure diffential would be about 14 psi.

The extremely thin aluminum in a soda can holds a pressure differential
of 100 psi.

The Apollo craft were pressurized and the skin on them is so thin the
average person could punch a hole through it bare handed.

You are full of crap.

And you bet the electric motor is heated, you will play hell keeping it
cool, even at altitude.


Brushless DC motors are different from conventional ones.


All motors have loss and the loss shows up as heat.

Cooling things at altitude is a problem because even though the air is cold,
it is very thin and you have to move a lot of it.

--
Jim Pennino

Remove .spam.sux to reply.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


I studied the topic of service ceilings as well as ramifications
of what can occur at this elevation. Do the same and find
out about airframe distortion, pressure loss and break-ups.
It's aviation 101, not Coke can 101. You can stand on an
upright egg collection. You can stand on a coke can. Your
anologys are laughable. Spacecraft are made different
than Cessnas.


Babbling nonsense.

Read for content. Air density and cooling aren't relevant
to a sealed unit.


Cooling is especially relevant for heat producing sealed units.

Are you sure you aren't around 12 years old?


--
Jim Pennino

Remove .spam.sux to reply.
 




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