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Cold Weather Winter Flying Q's



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 3rd 04, 11:59 AM
NW_PILOT
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Default Cold Weather Winter Flying Q's

I may have to go to the Regina, SK, CA/Minnesota area this winter for 2
months.

First Is Snow How Deep Before Ski's Are Needed? Ware to obtain ski's for a
cessna 150?

Best Type of Oil Heater?

Should One Use a Cowl Warmer?

I Notice in the manual something about a winterization Kit Can I
install/uninstall it my self? Can you still buy the winterization kit? If so
ware is the best place to buy?

Any Tips For Landing on Ice And Snow!

Any Extra Pre-Flight Inspections Needed For Extreme Cold Weather

Any other useful tips for that type of flying gladly accepted.



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  #2  
Old November 3rd 04, 12:20 PM
Paul Tomblin
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In a previous article, "NW_PILOT" said:
I may have to go to the Regina, SK, CA/Minnesota area this winter for 2
months.

First Is Snow How Deep Before Ski's Are Needed? Ware to obtain ski's for a
cessna 150?


It may surprise you to find out that Saskatchewan has snow plows. Many
airports will have clear runways, even in the middle of winter.


--
Paul Tomblin http://xcski.com/blogs/pt/
I treat shops as military objectives to be penetrated and stripped of needed
resources in as little time as possible. She has adventures in them.
-- Joe Thompson
  #3  
Old November 3rd 04, 02:24 PM
Nathan Young
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On Wed, 3 Nov 2004 03:59:31 -0800, "NW_PILOT"
wrote:

I may have to go to the Regina, SK, CA/Minnesota area this winter for 2
months.

First Is Snow How Deep Before Ski's Are Needed? Ware to obtain ski's for a
cessna 150?


Most airports will be plowed, and you would only require skiis if
landing offsite (like on a lake), or if it is snowing so hard that the
airport cannot keep up. I have landed my Cherokee in 1-2 inches of
snow, and it was fine. Be sure to remove your wheel pants. I have
heard that snow can get packed in the pant and either cause damage to
the pant, or to the tire.

Best Type of Oil Heater?


I've used a Red Dragon preheater to start down to 0degF. Be patient,
and let it run for a long time (30+ minutes). Definitely use a cowl
cover to help keep the heat in the cowling. The best pre-heat is just
to keep the plane in a heated hangar.

I Notice in the manual something about a winterization Kit Can I
install/uninstall it my self? Can you still buy the winterization kit? If so
ware is the best place to buy?


I don't know about the C150, but for the PA28-180, the oil temp will
not get above 125deg without the winterization kit. So it is a must
for winter flying. Just be prepared to take it off if you fly South
into warmer weather.

Any Tips For Landing on Ice And Snow!


Make sure your crosswind technique is spotless, and the crosswinds are
light. Seriously, landing on ice, or packed snow with a crosswind is
not easy. Once the plane gets moving sideways on ice it is difficult
to stop the side-motion given the lack of friction between the gear
and the runway. This is especially true as the plane slows down and
the control surfaces become less effective.

Also, taxiing on ice is difficult. Some ramps have a slant to them,
and the plane will want to 'fall' off the ramp.

One more tip for landing. Bring the plane to a complete stop on the
runway, then begin your taxi phase. A lot of pilots have thought they
have control of the plane, try to make a taxiway, and then end up in a
snowdrift.

Taxiways and runways will be lined with snow, possibly several feet
deep. As such, wingtip clearance (particularly on lowwings) needs to
be watched closely. Stay in the middle of the taxiway/runway and
watch those wingtips.

Any Extra Pre-Flight Inspections Needed For Extreme Cold Weather


Wear warm clothes in the plane, and have extra blankets for
passengers. Airplanes tend to be drafty, and when the OAT is below 0
deg F, it gets cold in a hurry.

Have a good pair of sunglasses. On a bright sunny day with snow
covering the ground, the brightness can be overwhelming.

When it is snowing lightly, VFR conditions will often be reported at
nearby airports. In flight visibility with snow can be quite low,
basically making it an IFR flight.
  #4  
Old November 3rd 04, 03:13 PM
G.R. Patterson III
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NW_PILOT wrote:

Best Type of Oil Heater?


Wag-Aero sells a cover kit for the oil tank. It's not a heater, but it will keep the
oil warmer when the engine's running.

Should One Use a Cowl Warmer?


If you intend to be flying somewhere, parking for an hour, and flying again without
pre-heat, I would buy an insulated cowl cover. I had a Kennon cover for my 150.

I Notice in the manual something about a winterization Kit Can I
install/uninstall it my self? Can you still buy the winterization kit? If so
ware is the best place to buy?


Back in the early 90's, my A&P told me that these were no longer available. He could
have been wrong. Check with an authorized Cessna service center.

Any Extra Pre-Flight Inspections Needed For Extreme Cold Weather


Preheat. If possible, get the heater outlet into the lower part of the cowl. That
will heat the oil tank as well as the rest of the engine.

Any other useful tips for that type of flying gladly accepted.


Keep the revs up - the heater works best near redline. I found that my heater was
most effective if I cracked the cabin air knob just a little to increase the air
flow. I would definitely wear insulated boots and either long johns or insulated
pants.

George Patterson
If a man gets into a fight 3,000 miles away from home, he *had* to have
been looking for it.
  #5  
Old November 3rd 04, 03:41 PM
Newps
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NW_PILOT wrote:
I may have to go to the Regina, SK, CA/Minnesota area this winter for 2
months.

First Is Snow How Deep Before Ski's Are Needed?


Depends on the plane and the tires you have. I have landed my 182 in a
few inches.


Ware to obtain ski's for a
cessna 150?


That's funny, ski's on a 150. A 150 can barely get out of its own way.



Best Type of Oil Heater?


You'll need a nose mitten first, no matter what type of heater you get.
You only need an oil pan heater. I have two on my 182. I can use one
or both at the same time, depending on the OAT. At zero degrees F and
both heaters plugged in the oil will be 100F and each cylinder will be
80F.



Should One Use a Cowl Warmer?


There's no reason to get an electric one, it's an inefficient way to heat.



I Notice in the manual something about a winterization Kit Can I
install/uninstall it my self?


That is a foam insulator that goes over the breather pipe. Get that at
your local hardware store. It also is two plates that get mount on the
front of the cowl, restricting the airflow. I made mine last year.
Found someone who had them and traced a copy for my self.


Can you still buy the winterization kit?

You might but they're really expensive from Cessna. Just make your own.



Any Tips For Landing on Ice And Snow!


Snow is fun. You'll make great landings. Ice is easy too. Just don't
be trying to stop quick or manuever.



Any Extra Pre-Flight Inspections Needed For Extreme Cold Weather


Make sure the gas quick drains still work. They'll freeze shut if
there's even a hint of water. To heat the interior, if you have
electricity available, leave a 60 or 100 watt light bulb turned on on
the fllor of the pilots side. The heat will warm the instruments and
make the interior a little warmer.
  #6  
Old November 4th 04, 02:46 AM
[email protected]
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My Minnesota thoughts -

1) Preheat only before flying. Do not heat continuously or you will
have internal corrosion in the engine cylinders. Inside storage is
OK.

2) Preheat long enough to get the oil warm too. Do not just preheat
to get the cylinders warm.

3) Don't think you can get by without preheat "just this once" when
below about 32 deg F, especially if you have non-winter grade oil. It
is really hard on an engine as it takes quite a long time for the
crankcase to develop an oil fog if things are too gooey. Scored
camshafts and cylinders can be the result. I like semisynthetic oils,
although the starter engagement on your 150 may not like the extra
lubricity.

Engine lube systems are such that the bypassed oil from the relief
valve does not have good access to the heat of the cylinders. They
then become actually surprisingly slow to warm up - especially if the
oil is thick, since most of the oil flow bypasses the engine after a
cold startup. Try to cover any oil coolers so that the oil temp
eventually warms up to 180 deg F in flight to minimize condensation in
the oil.

4) Add small amounts (couple of tablespoons or so) of isopropyl
alcohol (yellow can HEET) to the tanks as a matter if principle when
it is below freezing. You may otherwise have small amounts of
dissolved water in the fuel come out of solution as snow when the fuel
is severely chilled. Beware of fuel that has been severely chilled
since its last filtering. On a long flight, this snow can block the
fuel screens. I know, it happened to me although it was about -20 deg
F. I know of others that have had the same problem.

Personally I don't like to fly below zero F, as a result of 4), but I
know others do it.
  #7  
Old November 4th 04, 11:06 AM
Cub Driver
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Snow How Deep Before Ski's Are Needed?


In the NE, it doesn't take much more than an inch before you're in
trouble. However, very few people use skis. They plow the runway
instead.

At 7B3 Hampton NH, the plowing is done in a racetrack oval with the
east side being the runway and the west side the taxiway. The
"infield" is for ski planes if anyone is so equipped.

Our problem is more with ice than with snow. Plowing an open space
exposes it to sun, and of course you don't salt a grass field, so ice
forms and is difficult to get rid of--basically, it takes a good thaw.
Landing and taking off aren't the problem; taxiing is, especially on
the turns (I learned to switch to left magneto to slow down for the
turns) and in the wind (I was blown sideways several feet on one
occasion, very nearly into the snowbank).

As a matter of policy, the airport here doesn't rent the Cubs when the
air temp is below 20F.


all the best -- Dan Ford
email: (put Cubdriver in subject line)

Warbird's Forum
www.warbirdforum.com
Piper Cub Forum www.pipercubforum.com
the blog www.danford.net
  #8  
Old November 4th 04, 03:47 PM
Mike Rapoport
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wrote in message
om...
My Minnesota thoughts -

4) Add small amounts (couple of tablespoons or so) of isopropyl
alcohol (yellow can HEET) to the tanks as a matter if principle when
it is below freezing. You may otherwise have small amounts of
dissolved water in the fuel come out of solution as snow when the fuel
is severely chilled. Beware of fuel that has been severely chilled
since its last filtering. On a long flight, this snow can block the
fuel screens. I know, it happened to me although it was about -20 deg
F. I know of others that have had the same problem.


What is HEET? Thanks.

Mike
MU-2


  #9  
Old November 4th 04, 05:38 PM
Jay Honeck
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What is HEET? Thanks.

It's basically a small bottle of alcohol that is for sale at every gas
station in the Midwest from now through next April. Now it's about 49
cents apiece. When the temperature drops below zero, it'll sell for a buck
forty nine...

Funny thing is, I see people buying the stuff by the dozen -- yet they won't
use ethanol in their cars.
--
Jay Honeck
Iowa City, IA
Pathfinder N56993
www.AlexisParkInn.com
"Your Aviation Destination"


  #10  
Old November 5th 04, 01:17 AM
[email protected]
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What is HEET? Thanks.

Automobile gas line deicer. Some say Minnesotans drink the
stuff......!

Really HEET is not needed here anymore with our mandatory gasahol.

Beware there are two versions. Be sure to get deicer only with
isopropyl alcohol. Actually to be legal, you should use aviation
grade isopropyl alcohol. but I've never seen the stuff.

If you are using jet fuel for an MU-2 this doesn't apply. I don't
know what they use.

Mike
MU-2

 




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